Undergraduate Courses, Fall 2001

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Upper Division (3000–4000) Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

AML 3041

American Literature II: 1865 to Present

Carl Bredahl

In this section of AML 3041 we will be focusing on changing preceptions of the individual with a social frame work. We will read authors like Twain, Crane, and James in the late 19th Century and Frost, Stevens, Plath, Hemingway and Faulkner in the 20th.

Students will write weekly response papers [one page] to the assignments as well as two longer papers [5-7 pages]. There will also be several quizzes and exams. The class format is discussion so all students are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the assignments.

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AML 3270

African-American Literature I

Harry Shaw

African-American Literature: Beginning to 1940 will provide a survey of the most historically and literarily significant writings of Black Americans from 1760 to 1940. Major authors include: Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheathley, Benjamin Banneker, Frederick Douglass, David Walker, Harriet Jacobs, Martin Delany, Nat Turner, Sojourner Truth, Charlotte Grimke, Charles Chesnutt, Paul Laurence Dunbar, W. E. B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington, James Weldon Johnson, Claude McKay, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Marcus Garvey, Sterling A. Brown.

Students will be assigned several works for in-depth study of given authors, including supplementary xeroxed materials as necessary. The course work will consist of discussion of and writing about assigned readings, audio-visual presentations, oral reports and guest lecturers. Students will be expected to embellish their discussions, assigned papers, and tests with the help of critical essays available at the library or the Institute of Black Culture.

Students will be graded on performance on one major paper, tests, (mid-term and final) quizzes, classroom participation, attendance and punctuality.

Texts include:

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AML 3271

African-American Literature II

Mildred Hill-Lubin

This course surveys the literary development of African American Literature from 1940 to the Present. It begins with “Realism, Naturalism and Modernism” of the Forties and Fifties, includes the Black Arts Movement of the Sixties and early Seventies, and the Literary Renaissance of Black Women Writers.

Texts:

Requirements:

Assignments should be read before class and students are expected to attend class and participate in the class discussions and other activities of the course. Participation will count heavily where grade average is borderline.

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AML 3284

Boundary Lines: Women Writers and Southern Cultures

Anne Goodwyn Jones

When women’s studies began to look South – beyond New England – the subject that initially produced the most interest was not the diversity of cultures of southern women. With important exceptions in African American studies, the focus was on one culture alone: that of white elite women. Privileged yet disempowered, these white women were educated and literate. They left records: they wrote novels, letters, diaries, poetry. And their experience of oppression came from the very agents of their privilege, white men of power.

Southern women’s studies now has a far wider range of awareness. In this course, we will study the differences within southern women’s writings and the boundaries between cultures that establish those differences. Southern women have lived with racial boundaries, class boundaries, ethnic boundaries, and of course gender boundaries that, for example, kept “nice” white southern girls out of jeans, baseball, and medical school and labeled their assertive behavior “pushy,” while black girls were thought to be natural athletes, but not very educable, and incurably aggressive.

Southern women’s texts show the marks of engagement with boundaries, whether as victims, supporters, or transgressors. Women’s texts themselves cross borders between fact and fiction, disciplinary borders between history and religion, and borders of genre between, say, poem and novel. Even linguistic borders, naming a proper language, come under question. Across their multiple cultures, then, women writers of the South thus offer special insight – as women, as southern, and as writers – into the political, racial, economic, social, sexual, gender, and literary boundaries that have for so long plagued, pleased, and constituted the region. Their texts suggest that life on the borderlines has given southern women the gift, at times refused or abused, of second sight: into, around, and over the edges of things.

Replicating the history of southern women’s studies by design, we will begin with works by and about elite white women and African American women and end with works by and about contemporary women from the first southern cultures, Native American and Spanish. In between, we will trace a story of power and difference, intimacy and misunderstanding, contact and creativity, and a sometimes vexed sense of community, among and within southern women. Along with the readings of the literary texts, students will read several key essays from theorists, critics, and historians to nudge us in new directions.

We will think through and talk about these themes and texts as a developing learning community, by speaking and listening to one another, by producing and at times sharing creative and analytical responses for a weekly response journal, by using the University of Florida libraries and online collections to carry out research on our personal interests, and by asking what new learning methods the texts model for us. Students are expected to have read or seen the assignments on time (this will be verified by occasional quizzes), to attend regularly and participate actively in class work, to produce substantial weekly journal responses, to contribute to a group project and a class presentation of the results; and to write a 10-12 page final paper (or the equivalent).

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AML 3285

Western American Narrative

Carl Bredahl

This section of AML 3285 will be an introduction to the writing done in America about the land and people west of the Mississippi. This is new material to many readers, and we will find an enormous body of work that at best we can only survey. Even such a survey leaves out an extensive list of writers [Richard Hugo, Gary Soto, Ivan Doig, Larry McMurtry, Jim Harrison, James Crumley, Thomas King, Louise Erdrich, Sandra Cisneros, just to name a few.] We will, however, work with narratives which include the following:

Students will write weekly response papers [one page] to the assignments as well as two longer papers [5-7 pages]. There will also be several quizzes and exams. The class format is discussion so all students are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the assignments.

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AML 3285

Gays’ and Lesbians’ Literature in the United States

Kim Emery

Attending to to the dual terms of its title, this course will explore the interrelation of national and sexual identity in U.S. lesbian and gay literatures and related discourses. Although our focus will be on literary texts by self-identified lesbian and gay writers, we will also consider broader contexts and conversations from which these works emerge and into which they enter. Students will be asked, for example, to examine ways in which representations of “gay” identity play on and within discourses around gender and racial differences. We will focus on twentieth-century fiction, but also look at work in other genres (poetry, drama, memoir), including short, supplementary readings drawn from newspapers, medical texts, legislative reports, oral histories, and legal records.

Requirements: informed engagement with the course, including participation in class discussion; periodic quizzes; two formal papers; a class presentation.

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AML 4170

Studies in American Literary Forms

Anne Goodwyn Jones

American Literary Forms will focus on autobiography, or “life writing,” primarily from and of the U. S. South. We’ll study at least one book on creative writing (Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird) as students produce their own “life writing” throughout the semester. Oral history will constitute a small part of the course as well. We’ll look at Lee Smith’s novel Oral History as well as her recent edited volume of oral histories, Sitting on the Courthouse Bench. And students will work on their own oral histories as well, as part of the production of their memoir/autobiography.

Texts will be chosen from the following list:

Requirements will include regular attendance and active participation in discussions; journals and quizzes; short research and analysis papers; and a long life-writing project.

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AML 4225

Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture At Century’s End: Reform, Rebellion, and Naturalism in American Literature

Phillip E. Wegner

Tuesday 4, Thursday, 4-5
TUR 1105

As with the final decades of the previous century, the last years of the nineteenth century witnessed unprecedented changes in life in the United States. Some of the most significant transformations then underway included the increasing concentration of the population in urban centers, the closing of the American frontier, the arrival of new immigrant communities, the cultural emergence of an urban African-American elite, rapid industrialization, the dramatic growth of corporate power, an explosion of conflicts between labor and capital, the rise of modern mass culture, the development of new communication and transportation technologies, and shifts in sexual behaviors and gender relations. All of these changes had dramatic effects on the literary, artistic, and intellectual productions of this moment. Many intellectuals, writers, and artists began to examine with a critical eye the changes of their moment, giving rise to the new figure of the “muckraker.” Moreover, many of these same thinkers actively participated actively in programs of social and cultural reform and even revolution. At the same time, a number of younger writers – influenced by the work of the French author Emile Zola, the social theories of Herbert Spencer, and popular debates concerning evolutionary theory – challenged prevailing literary and aesthetic sensibilities. These American “Naturalist” writers introduced a new frankness and explicitness into American letters, exploring sexual, racial, and political issues that went beyond the pale of what was acceptable for an older genteel middle-class readership. While these works were tremendously controversial in their own day, they would influence the direction of literature and thought throughout the coming century. In this class, we look closely at the impulses to social reform and naturalism in late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century U.S. literature and culture, looking at a wide range of work by many of the era’s most influential writers and thinkers. Finally, we will touch on how these forms, practices, and ideas continue to influence literary and culture production into our own present, finding expression, for example, in such popular works as the 1999 films The Fight Club and Ghost Dog.

Readings will include many of the following:

and short fiction and essays by, among others: Zola, London, Hamlin Garland, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ida M. Tarbell, Emma Goldman, Jane Addams, Du Bois, Ida B. Wells, and Frederick Jackson Turner.

Requirements for the course will include regular attendance, participation in class discussion, occasional short writing and research assignments, and three formal written papers of varying lengths.

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AML 4242

Modern American Poetry at Millennium

Marsha Bryant

This course will assess the competing narratives and cultural constructs that frame 20th-century American Poetry in the 21st century. Besides asking what makes a poem, we will also ask how poetry has been used in American culture during the last hundred years. Our text will be Cary Nelson’s new and controversial anthology, Modern American Poetry (Oxford, 2000). This collection continues to delight and enrage academics both here and abroad, and we will be following reviewers’ competing narratives about the book in cyberspace. You’ll be widening your exposure to a variety of poetry: from standard modernist figures (such as Eliot, Pound, H.D., Stevens, Hughes), from recovered women and minority poets (such as Lowell, Millay, Grimke, Tolson), from recovered Asian-American voices (Haiku by Chinese immigrants and interned Japanese Americans), and from an especially controversial selection of contemporary poets. We will study both the poetry itself and the anthology’s central narrative about American poetry. We will also make productive use of the anthology’s companion website. Assignments include 1 panel presentation, 1 paper on a poet, 1 paper on anthologies, and an essay exam.

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AML 4282

Black Women Writers: Novels

Mildred Hill-Lubin

Andree Nicola McLaughlin writes in Wild Women in the Whirlwind:

Who would have believed that the “Kidnapped African” would be the architect of a literary renaissance in a foreign land? Who would have expected that thrice within a margin of one hundred years after slavery’s abolition, the descendants of slaves – for whose forbears reading and writing were against the law – would produce some of the most widely read writers in the modern world? Who could have known that, following in the steps of the Harlem Renaissance, The Black Arts Movement, the “daughters of captivity” would become leading spokespersons of their own causes with international constituencies? The literary upsurge by Black women in the second half of the twentieth century unveils a renaissance of the spirit inspired by those who have refused to surrender. Those who have resisted their oppression. Those who have undertaken to remake the universe to own their future.

Purpose: To explore this phenomenon, the writing of contemporary African American Women Writers. We shall examine what, why, and how these women write as they testify to the concerns, frustrations, joy, experiences, triumphs of Black women today. Our focus will be the novel, but we will include a few short stories and criticisms. We will try to determine whether these writers represent a community, share similar interests, themes, styles, audiences? I have included an African author, Ama Ata Aidoo to introduce the African Diaspora concept. We shall address topics such as voice, self, identity, spirituality, sexuality, motherhood and other mothers, male-female relations; what it means to be a Black woman writer in America? the politics of publishing, womanism, feminisim, theory, and criticism. Above all, I want to hear your voice, your interests, your comments and criticism of these writers.

Texts:

Requirements:

Students are expected to attend class and participate in class discussions. Assignments should be read before the class discussions.

Credit:

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AML 4282

Womanist Intellectual Thought

Debra Walker King

CROSS-LISTED WITH WST 4930 SECT. 4501

Objective: The obscuring position of African American women in the record of American intellectualism has resulted in a consensus among the uninformed that the phrase “black womanist intellectual” is an oxymoron. This seminar disputes that assumption by focusing on black women’s intellectual traditions and challenging imposed boundaries that define intellectual thought. Students will discuss the influences of black female intellectuals like Anna Julia Cooper, Zora Neale Hurston, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Alice Walker, Karla Holloway, and bell hooks in the development of literary and cultural criticism, education, law, and American social and political issues. We will address the following questions. What is an intellectual and how is this identity constructed? How does the intellectual differ from the academic? What is womanism? Is it as Audre Lorde once charged an “attempt to disclaim being feminist”? How does the black feminist differ from the womanist? Is there a need for such distinctions? Can someone who is not a black woman be a womanist (or can someone who is not a woman be womanist)? What is the relationship of community, family, religion, and spirituality to womanism? What is low and high culture (or low and high theory) and how does womanism address these distinctions? How do advocates of womanism view the activist and public intellectual? How does womanism differ from feminism?

Format: Class sessions include lectures, discussions, and student reports. The seminar is designed so that participants may not only understand but experience various modes of womanist intellectual engagement such as call and response dialectics and testimonial discourses. We will also focus on the meaning and importance of metaphors and coded phrases such as “willfulness,” “audaciousness,” “survival whole,” and “purple to lavender” that are associated closely with womanism.

25%: Journal Assignments: One response entry for each journal assignment (total of five). Each entry should address the reading material within two (typed) pages – no more than three. This is not the place for personal meditations. Keep the course objectives in mind when writing (but you may expand your comments beyond this boundary). Reflect upon previous entries and readings to demonstrate your growth in understanding and knowledge.Creativity and variety are important. For suggested approaches see the third and forth pages of this syllabus.

Evaluation: Although students receive a participation grade for in-class readings, I grade journals at the end of the term only. All journal entries must be well argued and well written. Your critiques and analyses must be convincing and well reasoned. The more original and thought provoking responses are the best. Variety is extremely important. Do not approach each journal entry using the same formula or focus. Journals that earn an “A” are creative as well as informative, insightful, and engaging. Paper mechanics are of utmost importance! Problems such as improper format, handwritten journals, misspelled words, and flawed punctuation are unacceptable.

Format: Number each journal assignment entry in the upper left corner of the entry’s first page. Identify the text or texts to which you are responding immediately below the entry number. Each entry should have a title centered on the third line of the first page. Provide one cover page with name, date, and course number. Points will be deducted if this format is not followed. This assignment is due 12/6.

50%: Womanist Essay: Alice Walker, the author of your essay subject text, Anything We Love Can Be Saved, is a controversial figure. As the originator of the term womanist and as a writer/activist she has been criticized and censored, adopted and applauded. With the publication of works such as The Color Purple and In Search of Our Mother’s Gardens, Walker is without a doubt the premiere womanist of the eighties. Considering one of her most recent publications and the many other voices claiming, renouncing, and redefining womanism, do you think the title is suitable today? Why or why not? Enter into a discussion with and about Walker’s latest book. How does she maintain ownership of the term womanist in these essays? How does her book contradict the voices of other womanist and black feminist intellectuals? How does it bring depth and insight to these voices? Does Walker’s book present an “intellectual” discussion of social, political, and cultural issues or is it more of an activist text? In your opinion, what is the difference between intellectualism and activism? Is Walker’s book essentialist, humanist, Afrocentric, or something altogether different? Does it support Tuzyline Jita Allan’s claim that “the big promise of womanism . . . is its function as a trope of otherness” whose “chief virtue [is] its capacity to mirror to white feminist critics and writers images of the white female subject as Other” (17)? Explain and support your assessments. Make sure you explore the fine distinctions and social constructions these terms and assertions call forth.

These seven-page papers should demonstrate your knowledge of womanist intellectual thought as defined and discussed in this course as well as your answer to at least three of the questions outlined above or in the course objectives. You may do whatever you wish to meet these requirements. For instance, you may select an issue presented in the subject text and discuss how Walker’s approach to it remains within the parameters of black feminist thought as Patricia Hill Collins outlines it or how Walker’s discussion presses against the borders of that definition – reforming and challenging it.

In these papers, you are a womanist intellectual. Your comments and observations should reflect this subject position.

25%: Participation, Exams, Take-home assignments, Quizzes, and Extra Credit In-class readings: Keep your journals current and bring them to class. Each week I will select several of you to share your thoughts with the class. Be prepared. These oral presentations are graded.

Attendance: Consistent attendance is mandatory and graded. Three absences are allowed without penalty. Each subsequent absence results in a letter grade reduction for this portion of your averaged grade. Excused absences beyond the three miss rule are permitted only if you provide a type-written letter from Student Affairs (or an official sponsor) documenting an illness, a family crisis, or participation in a university sponsored event. This letter is not required until you have missed three classes.

Preparation: All readings and take-home assignments must be prepared and ready for each class session. Please purchase a pack of 3x5 index cards. These cards are your entrance passes and will be used to inform me of your reading progress. Without an entrance pass you will be considered absent so be sure to put your name on them. Write a comment or a question on these cards demonstrating your preparation for the day’s session. I will address these cards in class randomly. If your card is not addressed or if you still have questions after a class discussion, I am available during my office hours.

Take-home Assignments: On occasion I will pass out study guides or assign take home projects. Even if I do not ask you to turn in these assignments, your in-class responses to them is required and will be graded.

Exams and Quizzes: There will be a mid-term exam and several pop quizzes. All unannounced tests will be averaged for a single grade. There are no make-up quizzes.

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AML 4453 American Protest Writing

Pat Schmidt

Where are we going, Walt Whitman?; The doors close in an hour.
Which way does your beard point tonight?
(I touch your book and dream of our odyssey in the supermarket and feel absurd.)
Will we walk all night through solitary streets? The trees add shade to shade, lights out in the houses, we’ll both be lonely.
Will we stroll dreaming of the lost America of love past blue Automobiles in driveways, home to our silent cottage?
Ah, dear father, graybeard, lonely old courage-teacher, what Amer-
ica did you have when Charon quit poling his ferry and you got out on a
smoking bank and stood watching the boat disappear on the black waters of
Lethe?

– From “A Supermarket in California,” Allen Ginsberg, Berkeley, 1955

Vietnam protests, Camelot, the Johnson presidency, the rise of a counter-culture and the return of Richard Nixon – all are signatures of two decades that continue to beguile and frustrate thoughtful scholars and students alike. Remembered best, perhaps, is the disorder that erupted after the election of John Kennedy in 1960 and ended before Ronald Reagan became president in 1980. Intertwined in these decades are dual strands of idealism and cynicism, hope and despair. In a discussion of the sixties, though perhaps no more so than in any other age, the observer’s angle of vision is all. Unlike the equally complex but more homogeneously perceived drama of 1776 – when, in John Adams’s idiom, thirteen clocks amazingly struck as one – the complexities and contradictions of the sixties virtually define the period, existing as they do within a grid of values that has shaped not only the observer’s perceptions but has itself been shaped by the period.

Such observations suggest a strong connection between the nature of social change and the role of the past. If the past is prologue – as I believe it is – what hieroglyphs remain and how are they to be explained? To compress such inquiries into one course is daunting. But by utilizing a variety of readings, lectures, and film footage from 1950-1970, I believe that we can learn a great deal about such phenomena as the Vietnam anti-War Protests, the Civil Rights Movement, feminism, and the counter-culture. In the process, I would like us to come away with a deeper understanding of the ways in which our experiences shape the narrative structures by which we tell ourselves about our world, and the connection of such structures to the creation of meaning, both in fiction and nonfiction.

Several articles, book excerpts, and primary documents will be placed on Reserve. Writing assignments will consist of a 5-7 page essay, a research project prospectus, and a research paper. Viewing history through the lens of literature, and reading literature through the lens of history, creates a dialectic that should enrich our understanding of both, providing insight into the social changes that are still Blowin’ in the Wind.

Texts:

Additional readings:

Recommended:

Films:

Assignments:

Written assignments include one short essay, a research project prospectus, and a research paper. All papers must be double-spaced with title pages, endnotes or textual notes (MLA or Chicago) and must include complete bibliographies. Late papers earn a drop of one letter grade for each day late.

Short Paper: (5 to 7 pages) 20 points. Due week four of the course. Carefully striving for a balance between liberal and conservative views, select a moment in the decade – the 1962 admission of James Meredith to the University of Mississippi; the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; the July 1967 riots in Newark and Detroit; the 1969 Woodstock Music and Art Fair; Eugene McCarthy’s decision in 1968 to enter the race for president; the anti-war “moratorium” of October 15, 1969; the May 4, 1970 slaying of students on the campus of Kent State. Compare the reporting of this event by Fortune, U.S. News, The National Observer to that of The New Republic, Harper’s, Rolling Stone, Time, Newsweek. Any illusion of mimesis (an accurate copy) of reality will be challenged as you read these articles. Discuss this phenomenon. Attention must be directed to the way that language acts as a vehicle for mediating between external reality and cultural expectations. From what set of assumptions (about order, hierarchy, military might, etc.) did the writers, whose work you consulted, most likely begin? How are they reflected in his/her structure of ideas, examples, metaphors, evidence?

Research Project: (15 to 20 pp) 50 points. Due two weeks before the end of the semester. This project is an extension of the one above. The topic must receive the approval of the instructor and should again draw on primary sources. A one-page prospectus that outlines the topic, explains the approach being used and the questions considered, as well as a discussion of relevant information about sources, will be required by week eight. In this paper, you are being asked to look for what Alfred North Whitehead called “the curves of history.” Utilizing the concepts discusssed above, your focus will shift to the larger canvas of which the above events are a part. Topics may range from contemporary reportage of: the consumerism of the fifties, the growth of the counter-culture, the role of the beats, and the push for sexual freedom, to an assessment of literary tastes, reportage of the 1968 presidential (Republican or Democratic) race, campus protest, the environmental or gay or women’s movement, etc. Your assignment is to explore “the idea of the variable ...and rate of change” during a particular time in the twentieth century and articulate the ways in which representations of such changes became “partial truths.” During the last two weeks of the class, you will be asked to discuss your process of discovery and the specific insights gleaned from your research with the class.

Plagiarism, the undocumented use of someone else’s work, will not be tolerated and will result in a flunking grade. If you do not know how or when to cite a source, see me.

Quizzes, homework, etc. 15 points
Class participation: 15 points

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CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

Chris Bachelder

Course description unavailable at this time.

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CRW 3310

Poetry Writing

Sidney Wade

Prerequisite: CRW 2300, with a grade of A or B.

For admission to the course, please submit a manuscript of four poems to the instructor by Monday, March 19, 2001. Include your name; email address; home phone number; and, as evidence of meeting the prerequisite, the relevant course number and semester, and name of instructor. A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, TUR 4211, by March 26, 2001. Students admitted will be listed with Telegator so that they can pre-register.

This is an upper-division writing workshop, in which we will be reading a wide variety of poems and carefully studying a number of exemplary works in order to understand what makes them live. Students will be expected to write a poem a week, on a prescribed model, and to discuss them generously and critically in class. There will also be a required class presentation on one of the chosen poems.

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CRW 4906

Senior Advanced Seminar in Poetry Writing

R. Brandon Kershner

TUR 4364
Phone 392-6650 x255

This course is organized as a workshop, concentrating on group critique of student work. Prerequisites for admission include a B or better in CRW 3310 and submission of three sample poems (see guidelines posted on doors of TUR 4211 and 4301). Some of the writing for the course will be in the form of assigned exercises. Required texts will include such books as:

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ENC 3250

Professional Communication

Wayne Losano

Since this is an upper-division course, students will be expected to show some grasp of the basics of grammar, mechanics, style and the proper formatting of papers, although all of these will be reviewed. Students will be expected to produce a variety of papers – two longer ones (a proposal and a formal report) and several short ones memos, letters, etc.) and give an oral presentation/conference paper. Ideally, some writing required in other courses can be used for the longer papers of this course. Close analysis of sample technical articles from recent journals will be part of the course.

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ENC 3254

Professional Writing in the Discipline

Variable

Call 392-5421: Except for 3 sections that are reserved for Education majors, this course is offered out of the Dial Center for Written and Oral Communication.

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ENC 3310

Advanced Exposition

Marie Nelson
4348 Turlington
mnelson@lin.ufl.edu

My years of experience as a teacher of expository writing should perhaps have given me the assurance it would take to step right up and make a statement like this: the more you know about language the better your writing will be. I can’t do it. Neither can I claim, as the writers of a new composition text claim with their title, that Practice Makes Perfect. The name of the text for our section of ENC 3310 is just Words on the Page: Writing about Language. Writing about language is what we are going to be doing, and all I can promise is that what you write will be carefully read, and with an intention to help you develop three of the twelve required preliminary assignments – I call them “starts” – into short, readable essays. I think it is also likely that you will learn more than you already know about about language, but this is not a linguistics course. It is a writing course.

The title of WP Chapter 1 is “Names: Personal, Botanical, Geographical....” “Animal and Human Communication” comes next, then “Hardwired and Acquired” (a consideration of language acquisition), and “Writing: Invention and Discovery” (which includes a story by Gregory Benford). Each chapter ends with a series of Writing Possibilities, from which you will choose one to write a short, certainly not more than one or two page “start.” You will then select one of your “starts” for further development into your first 3-5 page paper.

The next sequence, which includes “The Sounds of Language,” “The Varying Sounds of English,” “Words and Word-building,” and “-Nyms, -Types, and Polysemy,” will, again, provide possibilities for four “starts,” from which you will select a topic for your second 3-5 page paper. This pattern will be repeated with a third four-chapter sequence. The chapter titles here are “Who\What Drives the Sentence?” “What Are You Doing with Words?” “Metaphors We Think With,” and “Language and Schools.”

Twelve chapters, then, are included in our basic text. They include examples from sources as diverse as a quotation from Genesis followed by a short story by Ursula K. Le Guin, an advice to the gardener column I found in the Honolulu Advertiser; examples from the Cyberspace language of William Gibson’s Neuromancer; a play – The Crucible – by Arthur Miller (and a novel, I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem, by Maryse Condé, that presents a very different version of the Salem witch trials); selections from Jonathan Kozol’s Death at an Early Age and his recently published Ordinary Resurrections, and of course The Gainesville Sun, the Alligator, and the Internet. You will be required, then, to read the twelve chapters of Words on the Page, to write twelve starts, and to write three papers. One revision, or further development, of one of the 3-5 page papers will also be required.

I will not grade all the starts, but will return them with comments and ask you to bring them with you for writing conferences to be scheduled at the end of each four-chapter sequence. Your grade for the course will depend on 1) your timely response to the Writing Possibility Assignments, 2) your consistent participation in the work of the class, 3) the three papers you develop from earlier “starts,” and 4) your further development of one of the three papers.

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ENC 3310

Advanced Expository Writing

Wayne Losano

This section of ENC 3310 will focus primarily on style (concreteness, economy, accuracy, etc.). Readings will include Zinsser’s Writing Well and selected essays, Giving Good Weight, plus whatever else I can get reproduced. We will also review as many aspects of grammar/mechanics as student writing dictates.

Requirements:

Four papers, basically in the traditional modes of exposition – description, comparison and contrast, analysis, etc.

Papers will vary in length according to the nature of the assignment, the style of the writer, and the whim of the instructor, but none should be of epic proportions. Accuracy of presentation and effectiveness of style are more important than length.

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ENC 3312

Argumentative Writing

Blake Scott

This is a rhetorically-based writing course, which means that it aims to help writers practice composing the available means of persuasion in several specific situations. We will use classical rhetorical theory to identify, evaluate, and construct arguments about various contemporary issues. Our source for arguments and for models of effective and ineffective prose will be the New York Times. The daily assignment for both students and the professor will be to read the newspaper, paying special attention to different aspects of it at different times. But this is neither a journalism course nor a course on current events, although I hope the course will help you become a better informed and thoughtful citizen. The emphasis of the course will be on critical thinking and on effective, persuasive writing.

We will spend some time analyzing arguments that appear in the newspaper, from new analysis articles to editorials to sports columns. Some of these pieces will seem like overt arguments, and some will not. The purpose of this analysis will be to learn about a range of argumentative structures, moves, appeals, and styles. Since we will be both studying and writing arguments, we will write two different types of papers in the course. Some of your papers will be analytic, directed toward an academic audience, identifying and critiquing the rhetorical and linguistic features of arguments. Other assignments will ask you to construct your own arguments for readers of the Times, our campus newspapers, or other local audiences. Expect to do about 30 pages of writing, divided among 5 major assignments and a few minor ones.

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ENC 3312

Argumentative Writing

Pat Schmidt

One purpose of this course is to develop skills which will enable you to frame arguments which carry real weight and to develop confidence in deciding the strength of arguments made by others. To do so requires us to be able to demonstrate clearly the reasons for our beliefs and cogency of logical inference.

What we are “about” is more than that, however. In the words of Wayne C. Booth and Marshall W. Gregory, the authors of the text we shall use for the course, we are if moral agents attempting to do something in or to the world.” Thus, it is hoped that in addition to skills, this course will nourish the quality of thought which underlies good writing through readings selected for the course and through class discussions.

Robert Maynard Hutchins tells a story which nicely addresses the need for this second loftier goal:

My father came home from India about thirty years ago with the story of a British woman who was plagued to death by the questions of her Indian servant. Finally she said to him, ‘Why don’t you use your common sense?’ He replied, ‘Lady, common sense is the gift of God; I have only a technical education.’

Argumentation is a good deal more than a skill. The rhetorical assumptions which undergird it comprise a habit of mind. The course will be informed by an exploration of those rhetorical assumptions.

Texts:

Requirements:

Papers must be typed and double spaced with title pages. A bibliography and footnotes (or endnotes) should be used where appropriate. If the paper is late, its grade drops one letter grade for every day late. Staple or clip the pages. No binder or covers, please.

This is a demanding course so be prepared to work.

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ENC 4212

Professional Editing

Jane Douglas

Course description unavailable at this time.

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ENC 4260

Advanced Professional Communication: Scholarly Writing

Jane Douglas

Course Objectives: If you were to randomly query Florida faculty members, you would discover that a surprising number of them learned how to write publishable research papers and grant applications entirely through sweat, anxiety, and hard work – not under the auspices of any course. You’re somewhat more fortunate; this course covers most things you’ll need to know to write publication-worthy research papers in a variety of disciplines, as well as how to translate your research into readable prose that can be understood by grants foundations and the general public alike. Along the way, you’ll learn the stylistic and organizational strategies for writing clear, efficient, and highly effective sentences, paragraphs, and documents. And you’ll also learn everything from how to formulate a robust hypothesis to how to handle your research discussion when your outcomes haven’t quite panned out as you expected.

Disclaimer and warning:

I’ve designed this course to accommodate the needs of students in the Florida University Scholars Program, specifically those who have been pursuing directed research prior to enrolling in the course. While you can benefit from this course without having lab or research experience, you should be prepared to work harder than your more experienced peers, as you’ll need to identify research issues, questions, and appropriate methods as soon as possible during the first weeks of this course.

Assignments:

Your primary assignments include a brief (4-5 pp.) research/grant proposal, a research paper of at least 4000 words (approximately 16 pages), and either a brief newspaper article (2-3 pp.) or a press release (2-3 pp.) that conveys to a general audience the importance and implications of your research.

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ENC 4956

Overseas Studies in Studies

Undergraduate Coordinator

Prerequisite: This course must be approved by the Undergraduate Coordinator before the student travels overseas. It may be repeated with a change of topic up to a maximum of 15-credit hours.

This study, which may count towards the English major, involves course work taken as part of an APPROVED study abroad program.

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ENG 3113

Movies as a Narrative Art

Julian Smith

Prerequisite: any of the following: ENG 2300, ENG 3115, ENG 3121, ENG 3122, or permission of instructor.

ENG 3113 (section 3569)
(T 4, R 4-5, TE1-3 – TUR 2322)

Course Description: This course explores the convention of the mainstream (i.e., popular) narrative film – and the cultural, social, political, and aesthetic implications of those conventions. In some cases, we will study the relationship between individual films and their sources. Students are encouraged to read at least one recent screenplay. This is, primarily, a course in practical criticism and analysis. As such, it attends to such matters as structure, narrative point of view, and the way in which individual films reflect the times in which they are made.

Required Texts:

Required Essays: There will be at least four essays of increasing length and complexity concentrating on such matters as structure, narrative point of view, and other conventions.

Grading: Your final grade will be based on all work over the course of the semester, including essays, quizzes, and class participation. There will not be a final examination.

Instructor: J. Smith (Tur 4318; 392 6650, ext 248); smithj@english.ufl.edu

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ENG 3115

Introduction to Film: Criticism/Theory

Scott Nygren

This course will introduce current theoretical contexts for engaging the contemporary media environment, and will consider the writing of theoretical texts and the making of new films as parallel activities.

We will study world media through close visual analysis of individual films, stressing the historical and international diversity of cinematic approaches and styles. At the same time, we will study contemporary critical writing on film and its basis in the larger domain of cultural theory. Emphasis will be on such basic issues as audience identification, social formations and cultural context as articulated through a variety of post-structuralist methodologies. After introducing phenomenology and and structuralism as points of departure, the class will consider psychoanalysis, deconstruction, discourse, gender and race en route to postcolonial, postmodern and heterological approaches.

Our principle purpose will be to investigate the conjuncture of theoretical issues with an experience of specific film texts, and the function of these texts in the past and present workings of history, especially as this leads towards questions for future production and study. The working assumption here is that alphabetic writing and film production both constitute modes of inscription, and represent two ways of embodying the same cultural process.

Mastery of so many topics is neither possible nor expected. The goal is to understand the conditions and motives that led to the rethinking of media, and to initiate theoretical strategies in your own work.

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ENG 3121

History of the Film I: Early German Cinema-1945

Nora Alter

(Cross-listed with GET 2290, Sec. 1957)

Course description unavailable at this time.

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ENG 4015

Psychological Approaches to Literature

Peter L. Rudnytsky

This course will provide students with an introduction to the history of psychoanalytic theory and its applications to literary study.

Course Requirements:

Psychoanalytic readings will be drawn from Freud, Klein, Lacan, Winnicott, and Bowlby. The literary texts will be Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, anon. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Shakespeare’s Othello, Wilde’s Picture of Dorian Gray, Shelley’s Frankenstein, and Art Spiegleman’s Maus.

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ENG 4133

Scriptwriting

Julian Smith

Prerequisite: Any one of the following: ENG 2300, ENG 3113, ENG 3115, ENG 3121, ENG 3122, or permission of the instructor.

ENG 4133 (section 3568)
WE1-3, TUR 2322

Course Description: The primary purpose of this course is to give advanced students in film studies or creative writing some idea of how to go about writing an original screenplay for a feature-length theatrical motion picture intended for a mass audience. Attention will be given to the scriptwriter’s need to adhere to a very specific format.

The secondary purpose of this course is to consider the role of the scriptwriter and the screenplay within the evolution of narrative films.

Film Screenings: Students are expected to see at least one new or recent film in a theater or on video each week.

Required Texts: Kristin Thompson’s Storytelling in the New Hollywood; the screenplay for Erin Brockovich; a recent bestselling novel (to be announced). I also recommend but do not require Strunk and White’s Elements of Style, the best short book on writing simply and clearly.

Writing Assignments: There is a considerable amount of writing in this course. Early in the semester, all students will do screenplay format exercises based on topics or premises assigned by the instructor and will begin developing their own screenplay ideas. By the end of the semester, each student is required to turn in at least the first act or setup (about thirty pages) for an original screenplay, plus the last scene or sequence of scenes (about ten pages) of that screenplay, and a summary of everything in between.

Conferences: This class requires a number of formal conferences with the instructor to discuss assignments and work-in-progress.

Grading: Your final grade will be based on the quality of your work over the course of the semester. There will not be a final examination.

Special Note: Please do not register for this course if you are registered for my section of ENG 3113.

Instructor: J. Smith (Tur 4318; 392 6650, ext 248); smithj@english.ufl.edu

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ENG 4135

Italian Cinema

Mary Watt

CROSS-LISTED WITH ITT 3520, SECTION 5766.

Course description unavailable at this time.

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ENG 4136

Hypervideo: Rethinking Video Production

Scott Nygren

This course derives from a double convergence in contemporary media culture. On the one hand, cultural theory and innovative artistic practices now regularly overlap and exchange techniques. On the other hand, computers and video have now merged so that video imaging and computer interactivity now intersect and are reconfiguring the electronic field. Based on these convergences, the class will map the creative and conceptual possibilities of working in new contexts. The course will not teach traditional documentary, experimental or narrative uses of video as such, but will reinvent these approaches in order to produce visually articulate and engaging video in a contemporary world context. We will be shooting video on DV cameras and processing footage with desktop computers, using Final Cut Pro on Mac G4s. The implication of such high quality but low-cost desktop equipment, for the purposes of this course, is to make current technology available on an individualized basis for innovation and research. Much of the semester will be spent developing strategies for effectively using this equipment, and your participation will form a significant part of the course.

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ENG 4139

TV and Electronic Culture: Television Theory

Roger Beebe

This course will focus primarily on developing a theoretical understanding of US television as specific form of mediation. Objects of study will include soap operas, reality TV, home shopping, sports programming, music video, and many other televisual forms. We will also look at visions of alternative televisions either alongside the commercial networks (e.g., Paper Tiger) or within them (e.g., TV Nation). We will also examine video art (e.g., Nam June Paik), experimental film (e.g., Bruce Conner), and more directly confrontational practices (e.g., “Ad Busting,” the media piracy of Negativland and Craig Baldwin) as responses to US televisual society. Simultaneously, we will be exploring the connections between television and the greater cultural logic of postmodernism and the historical conditions of possibility for television’s emergence and spread.

Grading will be based on a midterm and final paper in addition to weekly quizzes.

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ENG 4905

Independent Study

Faculty Member of Choice

*An Independent Study course may be taken for 1- to 3-credit hours and will count as credit toward the English major. This course may be repeated with a change of topic up to a maximum of 9 credits.

This course is for advanced students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The student must find a faculty member who is willing to supervise the semester-long study, and together, the two create a project. The student must meet with the professor at designated times, agreed upon in advance, and complete all assignments in a timely manner.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Allegory

James Paxson

Honors Seminars require an upper-division GPA of 3.5 or above.

In classical rhetoric, allegory (Greek, allegoria or allos agoureuin, Latin, alieniloquium) was the mysterious mode for “saying other.” It allowed poets to encode philosophical, theological, or scientific ideas in adventurous, romantic, or quotidian narrative literature. Often, modern theorists can’t provide a decisive definition for “allegory”; though they are often confident enough to declare when a given text is not an allegory. Part of our work will be the (re)defining of allegory; the examination of how allegory relates to the rhetorical trope prosopopeia or personification; the significance of apocalyptic settings or narrative trajectories to allegory; allegory’s frequent dependence on descent and underworld-visit motifs (the epic nekia or katabasis); allegory’s dependence upon or relation to the grotesque as an aesthetic and cognitive category; and the status of allegory in a variety of discourses and institutional domains – from theology, poetics, and rhetoric, to narrative fiction, political propaganda, and pure theory.

In this advanced seminar, which will serve as much as a workshop for the study of critical theory as a survey of ancient, medieval, and modern literature, we will read a slate of primary and theoretical texts involving allegory. Primary texts will include the following:

Main theoretical texts will include these selections:

Course work includes three papers (5-7 pages each): one on a pre-modern or early modern allegory; one on a theoretical treatise about allegory that was written prior to the twentieth century; one discussing allegory’s fate in modern literature, art, cinema, or political, philosophical, or religious thinking. Attendance is mandatory, and, depending on class size, an oral presentation may also be required.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Wordsworth and His Circle

Judith W. Page

Honors Seminars require an upper-division GPA of 3.5 or above.

This course will introduce students to Wordsworth’s poetry and to his long poetic career in several different ways. We will read a selection of Wordsworth’s poetry closely and carefully, focusing on formalist, biographical and historical questions. We will also consider the way in which literary reputations such as Wordsworth’s take shape and evolve over time: from the poet of domesticity in the 1830s to the literary appropriator and thief of some feminist criticism. We will read a variety of critical and theoretical texts from the 19th and 20th centuries to see first hand how our concept of “Wordsworth” has changed.

In addition to this critique of the poet Wordsworth, feminist criticism and theory calls for us to acknowledge the women of the Wordsworth circle in their own right. Accordingly, we will consider the writings and contributions of Dorothy, Mary, and Dora Wordsworth, as well as those of several other women associated with the family. Although these women did not regard themselves as writers per se and were reluctant to publish, their travel writings, journals, diaries, letters attest to a vibrant manuscript culture that coexisted with William Wordsworth’s publishing career and with the texts that he chose not to publish-but to share informally – during his lifetime. The class will consider how our perspective of the Wordsworth circle changes when we bring these concerns from the margin to the center.

Students will keep their own journals, write and present one long paper to the seminar, and complete a final exam or project (probably a take-home).

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ENG 4940

Internship

Undergraduate Coordinator

Students must have completed at least 12 hours of 3000- to 4000-level English courses.

For students who want to gain experience in an English-related field. Students must find a business that will provide adequate supervision by a delegated authority in an appropriate work area. An initial description of the position from the intern, an outline on of the intern’s duties on the letterhead of the business, a final summary from the intern discussing the merits of the position, and a final evaluation from the business offering the intership. S/U option only. May be taken for 1 to 3 credit hours, depending on the number of hours worked during the week. See undergraduate academic advising in the English department for the guidelines.

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ENG 4953

Department Seminar: Charles Dickens: Culture, History, Ideology

Julian Wolfreys

Department Seminars are for ENGLISH MAJORS ONLY who have completed a minimum of 9 hours of English courses, level 3000-4000.

This course will explore a selection of Dickens’ writings throughout his career. It will focus on detailed study of a small number of publications, addressing the ways in which Dickens’ text mediates the interests of the nineteenth century while being articulated by contrasting, if not frequently contradictory, epistemological modes. Of particular concern will be matters of memory, testimony and responsibility, the grotesque, phantom effects, modes of urban representation, the limits of cultural and political institution, and strategies of social critique. The aim of the course will be in part to attempt to read a range of different, other Dickens’s, as alternatives to the conventional view of the author as “Mr. Popular Sentiment.” Through this, we will seek to explore various encrypted or submerged aspects of the Victorians, their obsessions and desires as these come to be traced in the materiality of the writing we term “Dickensian.”

Reading:

Requirements:

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ENG 4970

Honors Thesis Project

Faculty members (2) of Choice

Students must have have completed at least one semester of ENG 4936, Honors Seminar. Open to English Honors students.

The student must select two faculty members: one to direct the reading, research, and writing of a thesis on a topic of the student’s and director’s chosing, and another as the second reader. An abstract (100 to 200 words) and one copy of the thesis (30 to 50 pages) must be delivered to the CLAS Academic Advising Center on Fletcher Road at least 10 days before graduation.

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ENL 3112

18th-Century English Novel

Melvyn New

This course will cover the rise and development of the novel from Daniel Defoe to Jane Austen. We will frame this development by reading alongside the prose fictions, John Milton’s Paradise Lost. Among the fictions to be read are Robinson Crusoe, Richardson’s Pamela, Fielding’s Joseph Andrews and Shamela, Sterne’s Tristram Shandy and A Sentimental Journey, Johnson’s Rasselas and Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. We will discuss these fictions from several different angles, social, political, economic, theological, psychological, hobby-horsical, aesthetic, formal, generic, etc., since I’ve not yet made up my mind which critical approach ought to be the only critical approach – if I should happen to become a marxist or foucaldian before the fall, we will narrow our focus accordingly – but I rather suspect I will still be undecided this fall as in my past 35 years of teaching. There are quzzes to ensure reading and the usual writing assignments expected of English majors. This is not a course for non-readers – or readers whose attention span is restricted to the length of Cliff’s Notes. Some of these books are long, some are difficult; only those students who really enjoy reading will profit from this course

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ENL 3122

The English Novel: Nineteenth Century

Pamela Gilbert

This is a tentative description.

Reading may include the following: Books will be available at Goering’s. An asterisk means that it is important you have the edition that I have ordered, as there may be materials assigned therein.

The Course:

This course samples key developments in the British novel through the nineteenth century. We will examine the novels within three contexts: historical, literary-historical, and critical. If you have not had English 2022, you should plan to familiarize yourself with the period: the Norton Anthology introduction to the period is a good place to start. Gilmour’s and Houghton’s books are also very useful and will be on reserve in the library. The Victorian period was the great age of the novel’s emergence as a dominant popular form within a newly extensive literary marketplace, and Victorian novelists were consummate entertainers driven to sell widely and well. They were also preoccupied with the condition of their own culture; to paraphrase Richard Altick, rarely is the Present so much present in literature as it is in the novel of this period. Victorian novelists considered it their duty and pleasure to criticize, praise and generally comment upon current issues, and they developed new forms and genres to accommodate their purposes. These issues represent the formative phases of social concerns which we have inherited and which still define us: the role of mass media, the ethics of capitalism, gender roles, the responsibilities of liberal govermnment, the welfare state, pollution, the role of nation in the global community.... We will read a range of representative genres and consider them not only in the light of the emergence of the novel as a dominant form, but as documents of a culture’s attempts to represent and work out these issues of contemporary importance – aesthetically and ethically – and consider the ways in which Victorian ideas resonate for us today.

This course provides upper-division credit in the major, and will be taught with that in mind; therefore, students will be expected to know how to do research in the field and to attempt the application of critical frameworks. Due to the nature of the material, there is a considerable amount of reading. Carefully consider your reading speed and the expectations of the other courses you are taking before committing to this course.

Grading:

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ENL 3132

Twentieth-Century British Novel

R. Brandon Kershner

The course is a survey of the development of the twentieth-century “British” novel (including Ireland) through the present. The first half of the course will stress the arrival of modernism in the novel and the particular influence of literary impressionism; the second will explore lesser-known novelists, especially women, who are often excluded from surveys. We will also examine the question of postmodernism in the novel.

Requirements include two short essays (roughly eight typed pages in length). The subject of the first paper will be point of view in one of the authors we read before the midterm; the subject of the second will be open, but it must concern the work of one of the novelists we are reading after the midterm. There will be a midterm and a final exam, both including objective and essay parts, but the objective part of the final will not be cumulative. Papers and exams count equally toward your grade. Depending upon the class’s demonstrated preparedness, there may be occasional quizzes, each counting 1/4 of a paper grade. An additional grade, between C and A, will reflect your class participation.

Books may include:

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ENL 3132

Twentieth-Century British Novel

Julian Wolfreys

This course will introduce the student to the British Novel and the challenge which different forms of the “British Novel” issue to the English novel in the 20th Century. Particularly, novels written in the second half of the century will be studied, but the course will begin through a consideration of the modernist novel, exemplified by James Joyce’s Ulysses. We will ask, in the process of considering the various transformations the novel undergoes: is there any longer such a thing as the “English novel”? Is the 20th novel in English definable precisely by the sense that there is no such thing as the “English novel”? The hegemony of the “Englishness” of the “English Novel” constantly challenged, and the most appropriate way to address this is to consider matters of heterogeneity, fragmentation, and a consistent, and consistently different emphasis on difference and otherness. The focus on forms of narrative in the second half of the twentieth century is taken so as to examine the ways in which, after WWII, the identity of the English novel is transformed and translated from within itself, into myriad identities, with multiple and heterogenous constituencies. At the same time, there will be an exploration of the ways in which the “British Novel in the 20th Century” consistently challenges readerly expectations. Readings will focus on and explore various forms of experimentation on the part of the novelists in question while, as a strategic common thread, several novels which take as their setting London will be considered. In addition, we will explore the novel for its interest in carefully defined and confined social groups, for the narrative construction of identity, particularly as this concerns matters of gender and race.

Reading:

Requirements:

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ENL 3154

Twentieth-Century British Poetry

Marsha Bryant

Responding to the violent aftermath of Ireland’s Easter Rebellion of 1916, W. B.Yeats wrote of a time in which “All changed, changed utterly.” The poets we will assess in this course reflect the onslaught of cultural changes that shaped “the widening gyre” of the 20th century. We begin with Yeats and then move to Edith Sitwell, whose experimental text Facade combined music and spoken poetry. Sitwell was also one of the early promoters of Wilfred Owen, the most famous poet of the Great War that killed him in 1918. Dylan Thomas continued Sitwell’s experiments with sound, and her use of performance to reposition poetry in culture. Stevie Smith’s darkly comic poems and drawings challenged changing gender roles in the years between the wars, while W. H. Auden’s work of the 1930s captured the sense of impending crisis that would erupt at the outbreak of WWII. Philip Larkin’s post-war vision cast a cynical eye on modern romance and Britain’s world status. Ted Hughes, violence becomes the defining feature of our relationships with one another and with the natural world. Finally, contemporary Irish poet Eavan Boland continues Smith’s inquiries critique of domesticity, and Yeats’s unsettling of the “British” label. Assignments will include a panel presentation, an explication of a poem, a cultural analysis paper, an essay examination, and class participation.

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ENL 3210

Medieval English Literature

James Paxson

Medieval English Literature is a general introduction to the thought and culture of the Middle English period (c. 1100-1500 C. E.). It will thus serve mainly as a resource or backgrounds course designed to prepare students for Chaucer as well as for Renaissance authors. Much energy will thus be devoted to the influence of classical culture on the medieval imagination, while special attention will be paid to the institutions of medieval interpretation and allegory. We will study key genres including epic, romance, the allegorical dream vision, the philosophical debate, and the travel narrative not only to appreciate their literary or aesthetic dimensions but also to take into account medieval systems of psychology, ethics, history, theology, rhetoric, poetics, and semiotics; issues of gender and sexuality will figure prominently. Students should thereby develop knowledge in the various critical, literary, or cultural theories that have come to shape contemporary medieval studies in particular and English studies in general. They are urged to make use of web resources, including the excellent pages of the Labyrinth (http://www.georgetown.edu/labyrinth). Attendance and participation are mandatory.

Course Work will include: one short paper (about 5 pages) that discusses the importance of a major text or author preferably not included in our syllabus that has influenced Middle English literature [20% of final grade]; a term paper with citational apparatus (10-13 pages) that treats an important theoretical or topical problem in the literary texts we’ll be studying this term [40% of final grade]; final examination for testing general knowledge of medieval culture and narrative particulars of texts under study [20% of final grade; students who have an A average will be exempt]; objective pop quizzes and ancillary projects [prospectus for term paper, sporadic homework problems – 10% of final grade]; class participation [10% of final grade].

Required Texts will include:

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ENL 3230

Age of Dyden and Pope

Melvyn New

This course covers the period of English literature between 1660 and 1745. Among the authors and works we will be reading are John Milton’s Paradise Lost, Alexander Pope’s poetry, Jonathan Swift’s Tale of a Tub, John Dryden’s poetry, some Restoration comedies by Congreve, Wycherley and others, Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress, and Defoe’s Journal of the Plague Year. The course will be about equally divided between history, politics, religion, and eighteenth-century life on the one hand, and poetics, rhetoric, and aesthetics on the other. This is a course for students who like to read and who believe that English majors should be familiar with the most important writers in the tradition – as one student pointed out, I seem to be one of the few instructors left who uses the word “genius” when discussing authors and literature – I do happen to believe that Milton, Pope, Swift, and Dryden are all brilliant writers who accomplished with language what only a handful before them and after them have been able to equal – we are as dwarfs standing on the shoulders of giants. There are quizzes to ensure reading and the usual writing assignments expected of English majors.

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ENL 3241

British Romanticism

Richard Brantley

This course is a survey of such major British Romantic writers as:

The course emphasizes a historical, interdiciplinary approach.

Text: English Romantic Writers (anthology) David Perkins

Requirements:

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ENL 3241

The Romantic Period: Early British Romanticism

Judith W. Page

This course is repeatable, up to a maximum of 6 credits, with a change of topic.

This course will focus on selected authors from the first generation of British Romantic writers, including:

We will discuss various questions in literature and culture from the 1780s until around 1814, including the relationship between literary and popular culture (particularly gothic and folk traditions), revolutions in politics and in poetic genres and styles, practical and theoretical problems of canon formation, as well as questions of gender and sexuality. Students will be expected to read texts closely and carefully.

Students will write at least two papers and take midterm and final exams.

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ENL 3251

Victorian Literature

Patricia Craddock

Information for this course may be obtained at the following site: Victorian Literature

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ENL 4220

Elizabethan Prose

Jack Perlette

The course will concentrate on prose fictions written and/or published during the reign on Elizabeth I (1559-1603). Specifically, we will focus on the interplay between text and society in terms of the textual production and/or subversion of ideologies of gender and of status and class. My goal is to provide a course useful not only to students interested in the Renaissance, but also for those interested more generally in narrative fiction and ideological critique, in feminist/gender approaches, and in the relationship of literature to society.

Tentative Readings:

Requirements:

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ENL 4273

20th-Century British Literature

Alistair Duckworth

Concentrating on fiction and poetry, we will (in the first half) discuss selected works of major canonical figures such as Yeats, Joyce, Lawrence, Eliot, and Woolf. More arbitrarily (in the second half), we will discuss such poets as Auden, Stevie Smith, Larkin, Duffy, Harrison, and Heaney and such prose writers as Spark and Trevor. Some attention will be paid to recent Scottish and Irish fiction (e.g., Irvine Welsh and Roddy Doyle) and to “immigrant” fiction (e.g., Hanif Kureishi). Taking note of the terrible events of the last century – the two World Wars, the Spanish Civil War, the Holocaust, the troubles in India and Ireland – we will examine the special ways in which individual writers reflect and interpret their historical moments.

This is a course for students who like literature and believe it has something to tell us.

The format is lecture and discussion – with discussion warmly encouraged.

Students will be expected to be prepared for all assignments and to attend regularly. Written requirements are:

All five written requirements will count equally in computing the course grade.

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ENL 4311

Chaucer

Al Shoaf

Aims of the Course:

The course seeks to familiarize students with the major poetry of Chaucer in its historical context (primarily, though not exclusively, Troilus and Criseyde and The Canterbury Tales) and to introduce them to the principal methodological issues at stake in the modern study of Chaucer – especially the question of sources, the problem of “translation,” the nature of allusion, the representation of the body, and the status of metaphoric discourse in late medieval poetry.

Attention will also be paid to Middle English as a language, and some effort will be devoted to “performing” Chaucer aloud. (Tapes of Chaucer’s poetry read by professional Chaucerians can be ordered from a non-profit organization; details will be offered in class.)

Texts:

Requirements:

Spot quizzes (unannounced except for the notice on the syllabus); one modernization quiz (30 minutes); two in-class exams (2 hours each); one paper, 5 pages in length; no final exam; mandatory attendance – the first three (3) absences will be excused, but each absence after three, unless excused for extraordinary reasons, reduces your final mark by 10% (NB: 2-period classes count as two classes).

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare

Robert Thomson

This course will involve a close study of a dozen or so of the plays and a number of readings from the poems and elsewhere. Emphasis will be laid upon the problem stating – solving – mediating nature of the dramas. This will necessitate a close reading of the texts; a recognition of the dramatic and verbal ironies that abound; close attention to the paradoxes and ambiguities which motivate the actions and observation of the stark oppositions which are continually reiterated.

We will be led into a contextual study of both the world within and the world without the Elizabethan theatre, with its concern for an orderliness and its doubts and confusions as the new seventeenth century learning questioned and undermined the values and socio-political/religious assumptions of its society. We may then come to appreciate how these great plays and poems still speak to us with immediacy after a span of nearly four hundred years.

I intend to spend time with the following plays and in addition may spare more than a passing glance at one or two others:

Text:

The Complete Signet Shakespeare

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LIN 3680

Modern English Structure

Roger Thompson

Visit the following site to view the syllabus: LIN3680 syllabus

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LIT 3003

The Forms of Narrative

Don Ault

Required texts:

This experimental course will focus on the transformation of plots and characters from one medium to another. Some of the objects of analysis may include the following: Dashiell Hammett’s Maltese Falcon (which exists in novel form, several movie versions, and a photo-film book), comic strip characters (Segar’s comic strip Popeye, which was translated into animated cartoons by the Fleischer brothers and a feature film by Robert Altman), comic book characters (Siegel and Schuster’s Superman and Bob Kane’s Batman, beings who have had numerous incarnations in comic strips, animated cartoons, movie serials, television series, and feature films), and Disney animated cartoon characters (Mickey Mouse, who originated in animation, developed most fully in Floyd Gottfredson’s comic strip, then migrated into comic books, especially in the work of Dick Moores, Bill Wright, and Paul Murry, and was eventually converted into the function of a corporate logo and has recently undergone a resurrection in the television series Mouse Works; and Donald Duck who originated in animated cartoons, appeared in Al Taliaferro’s comic strips, achieved most complex embodiment in the comic book stories of Carl Barks, and then was displaced in the TV series Duck Tales, which foregrounded Barks’s creation Uncle Scrooge, a character whose very being has been rewritten in the past ten years by Don Rosa in an attempt to totalize Scrooge’s “history” into one seamless story).

For each class meeting you should read the essays and the visual material carefully several times in order to be able to discuss them knowledgeably; you need to attend screenings and discussions of them, as well as view material independently on Reserve; you will be required to submit take-home writing assignments, which will involve both critical and creative experiments. There will also be frequent shot in-class quizzes over the readings. You may also submit an optional final paper to substitute for or augment the specific assignments if there is something of particular interest to you that is (or is not) covered in the course. Your final grade will be based primarily on these exercises, quizzes, and projects.

A significant amount of class time will be taken up with screenings, and you will need to do a good bit of work in the Reserve room. Because I plan to conduct the class as much as possible as a discussion rather than a lecture, productive class participation can make a significant difference in your grade.

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LIT 3031

Studies in Poetry

Victoria Schooler

Course description unavailable at this time.

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LIT 3043

Studies in Modern Drama

Sid Homan

In this course we study the modern theatre by “doing it” : each students picks a scene partner and together they rehearse and perform scenes from the plays in question. The assumption of the course is that the theatre involves not just a literary text, but also a play’s sub-text, its movement (gesture, blocking), its physical, spatial, and temporal relationship with the audience. While the course, therefore, involves acting and directing, students are judged not by the finesse of their work but by their intention, and so, historically, mechanical Engineering majors, for example, have done just as well as Theatre majors, who in turn have no advantage over English majors. Students will also be involved in the production of Sam Shepard’s Curse of the Starving Class, which Professor Homan will be staging at the Acrosstown Repertory Theatre in March/April. Along with that play, we will do Shepard’s True West, Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, and Pinter’s The Lover and Old Times.

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LIT 3374

The Bible as Literature

Richard Brantley

The course will approach the Hebrew Scriptures according to such genres as narrative, prophecy, poetry, and wisdom literature. The emphasis will be formalistic, thematic, and contextual. The text will be the New Revised Standard Version. Instructions for the midterm and final will read as follows: “Identify the following fifteen passages. Comment on four. Take class discussion into account and go beyond it.” The 6,000-word journal (about twenty pages)is presented in two installments of 3,000 words each. Journal entries may vary in length. They may range along a continuum, with subjective, creative responses at one end, and expository responses at the other.

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LIT 4183

Postcolonial Literature, Culture, and Theory: “Growing Up in the Empire”: Introduction to Postcolonial Literature

Leah Rosenberg

Colonialism has shaped the lives of more than three-quarters of the world’s population (The Empire Writes Back 1). Postcolonial literature is the literature of this majority, but how can we define postcolonial literature? It includes literature of Africa, Asia, the Americas, encompassing not only enormous geographical regions, but vastly different societies with vastly different histories and vastly experiences of colonialism. It includes the study of works not only of the postcolonial era but works written under colonialism. Moreover, previously colonized countries now experience economic and cultural imperialism. Why use the post, if the effects of colonialism persist? This is the first question we address in class: What are the advantages and disadvantages of the concept of “postcolonial”? Our second challenge is to address this vast and diverse body of work.

To provide a historical overview of postcolonial literature and theory, this course focuses on theoretical conceptions and literary representations of colonized and postcolonial identity. Beginning with work of Albert Memmi and Frantz Fanon, we move from conceptions of the colonized, colonizer, and nation developed during struggles for nationhood in the 1950s to increasingly complicated understandings of identity – definitions that resist the possibility of a unified self, that self-consciously interrogate gender, class, ethnicity, and place. We move from novels that envision the nation as an antidote to the colonized state and in which identity and nation are founded in a particular geographical place to novels about the process of deserting nation in favor of immigrant identity. It is a shift in which the bounded nation is displaced by diaspora and by the transatlantic for instance. In Bharati Mukherjee’s understanding of immigrant identity or Paul Gilroy’s concept of the Black Atlantic, identity is based not on shared experience of land but on shared culture or experience across physical boundaries.

Readings:

Requirements:

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LIT 4188

World English Language Literatures: Making Literary History: Approaches to the Study of Anglophone Caribbean Literature

Leah Rosenberg

“Making Literary History” studies anglophone Caribbean literature from its emergence at the turn of the 20th century to the beginning of the 21st by focusing on the following: (1) The Prominence of Women, Sexuality, and the Folk in early national literatures of Trinidad and Jamaica, 1890-1930s; (2) The role of the Caribbean and Caribbean writers in the Harlem Renaissance, 1920’s-1940s; (3) Exile and Gender in nationalist literature,1950-1970; and (4) Gender and Sexuality in Caribbean writing in the United States 1980-2000. These units will allow to evaluate national and regional approaches to Caribbean literature: In which ways does the literature of the anglophone Caribbean – defined as the former colonies of England – constitute a coherent body of literature? What advantages come with a narrower focus on specific national literatures? If we understand anglophone Caribbean literature as a coherent body of texts that share a common culture based in part in their history of English colonization, are we to include recent literature written in English from Haiti and Cuba, for instance? What are the benefits of placing anglophone literature in relation to francophone, hispanophone, and Dutch literature from the Caribbean – of seeing the Caribbean literature as an international body of texts?

Readings:

Requirements:

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LIT 4188

Scottish Literature and the Question of Culture

Phil Wegner

Tuesday 7; Thursday, 7-8
TUR 1315

Questions about what define traditions and identities are currently among the most hotly contested in literary and cultural studies. The conclusions we come to in these debates will have dramatic effects on the shape of our world in the coming decades. However, what appears to us as quite contemporary concerns have, in fact, been central in the literature and culture of Scotland for more than two hundred years. Although T. S. Eliot could in 1919 answer the question in the title of his essay “Was there a Scottish Literature?” with a resounding ’no,’ today, as the very monolithic and hierarchical notions of literature and culture advanced by Eliot, among others, have come under increasing scrutiny – and indeed, as the very unity of Great Britain itself is being challenged – different answers begin to emerge. Questions about the identity of Scottish culture, its history, and its relationship to entities such as Great Britain and Europe have been at the heart of the work we shall examine in this course, beginning with that of the figure still considered one of the founders of modern Scottish literature – and the inventor of the vital modern literary form, the historical novel – Walter Scott, up through the present-day, phenomenally successful underground fiction of Irvine Welsh (works by both authors too have recently been adapted to film, Scott’s Rob Roy and Welsh’s Trainspotting). What we will see in these works is a profound tension emerging from the special position of Scotland in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, located at once at the center, and indeed forming the very backbone of the mighty British empire, and on the margins. We shall use these works to investigate some of the central issues in contemporary literary and cultural studies, including those of marginality, regionalism, canonicity and ’minor’ literature, romance and realism, language and identity, the invention and force of the idea of tradition, self-determination, ethnic and civic nationalism, universalism and particularism, literature and politics, and the contested terrain of history itself. We will also explore the ways this marvelously rich tradition casts new light on the central ethical question of the relationship between the self and the Other. And through it all, you will have the opportunity to become acquainted with a rich, innovative, and still growing literary tradition, one that both opens up unique perspectives on the experiences of the last two centuries and illuminates the complexities of multi-layered cultural identities in the contemporary world.

Readings will include: short fiction from Douglas Dunn, ed., Oxford Book of Scottish Short Stories; poetry by Robert Burns, Hugh MacDiarmid, and others; novels, including, Walter Scott, The Heart of Mid-Lothian; James Hogg, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner; Robert Louis Stevenson, Kidnapped; Lewis Grassic Gibbon, A Scots Quair; Muriel Spark, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie; and Irvine Welsh, Trainspotting; and a few films (Braveheart, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, and Trainspotting).

Requirements for the course will include regular attendance, participation in class discussion, occasional short writing and research assignments, and a three or four formal written papers.

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LIT 4320

Introduction to Folklore

Robert Thomson

This is in every sense an introductory course; I assume no knowledge on your part of either the materials or the study of folklore though of course many of you will have at least an inkling of what is intended here. By the term “folklore” I mean firstly the materials that are subsumed within the many diverse activities of folklore performance including narratives in the form of epics, ballads, folksongs, folktales, legends, myths and folk dramas as well as usages of idiosyncratic verbal play such as riddles and rhymes and also proverbs, charms and other verbal utterances associated with superstitious practices and beliefs. All of these forms, by their usage within a folk group, impose a distinctive character upon that group. They may function as both a reflection and constant reinforcement of the manners and mores of a group. However, because it is essentially an unwritten culture, folklore is constantly adaptable to change even though it may, paradoxically, resist alteration.

The term “folklore” also has a second usage; it encompasses the discipline of the study of folklore materials. And so our course will attempt to cover both an introduction to the materials of folklore and also a wide ranging though necessarily brief examination of the many and various methodologies and theoretical approaches which have arisen to explain the origins, nature, forms and meanings of folklore genres.

In the broadest terms, the syllabus may be divided into four (unequal) sections:

Texts:

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LIT 4331

Children’s Literature

Jim Haskins

Course Description

The course will examine picture books, board books, counting books, video and audiotapes, as well as a history of each genre, with special emphasis on classism, racism and sexism. Reports on reviewing services and the major awards in children’s literature will be assigned, as well as class discussion and reports on multi-ethnic literature, with emphasis on African American, Asian, Latino and Native American literature.

Required Texts

Requirements

Research Paper:

One research paper of 10 to 15 typed, double-spaced pages (topics to be cleared with me before beginning work), due in the English Department office no later than 4:00 PM, Friday of “dead week.” A box with my name and course number will be available there. Do not put papers on my office door.

Grading:

Your grade for this course will be calculated as follows:

Office hours:

Wednesdays 5th period or before/after class on Tuesdays and Thursdays

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LIT 4332

Literature for Young Children

John Cech

(Actual course may vary a little.)

This course is meant to be an introduction to and an exploration of the child’s earliest experiences with literature, from birth until his/her first years in school. We will examine the basic genres, historical movements, critical approaches, and major writers and illustrators in the field within the context of the imaginative, aesthetic, moral, and psychological growth of the young people for whom they were produced. The course is designed to involve you actively, analytically, and creatively in the study of this subject. You will be encouraged to develop a first hand understanding of how some forms of children’s literature are created; you will be asked to look at works for children with critical sophistication; and you will be urged to do your own field work, testing the assertions, questions, and ideas that are raised in the course about what is the first and thus, arguably, our most important encounter with literature.

Tentative Texts:

Requirements:

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LIT 4333

Literature for Adolescents

Kenneth Kidd

Adolescent literature did not appear for the first time in the 1960s, with the advent of authors like Judy Blume and Louise Fitzhugh who tackled divorce, sexuality, and generic teen angst. The term “adolescence” descends from Latin, and the earliest entries in the Oxford English Dictionary date from the fourteenth century. Shakespeare describes the “seven ages” of mankind; picaresque heroes and heroines like Gil Blas and Moll Flanders struggle to survive the vicissitudes of youth and poverty. As the nineteenth century unfolded, however, new genres dramatized the transition from childhood into adolescence, and glorifies adolescence as a distinct and crucial period of development. By the end of the century, many “adult” novelists were devoting their attention to (if not quite writing for) adolescents; representative titles include Dostoevski’s The Adolescent (1874) and Henry James’ What Maisie Knew (1897). Such texts emerged alongside clinical-pedagogical literature about adolescence-e.g. Granville Stanley Hall’s two volume Adolescence: Its Psychology and Its Relations to Physiology, Anthropology, Sociology, Sex, Crime, Religion, and Education (1904). Literature by adolescents also began to appear by the century’s end; the first adolescent diary written for publication was apparently Marie Bashkirtseff’s Journal (1887).

With this history in mind, this course examines literature for, by, and about adolescents from the late nineteenth century to the present. We’ll concentrate on young adult literature from the 1960s to the 1990s, but we will read and discuss it in light of these earlier narrative traditions. We’ll be particularly concerned with the twentieth century’s reinvention of the nineteenth century adolescent. The modern teen is of course intimately connected to material culture; being a teenager means watching tv, driving cars, and buying lots of cool stuff. It also means being a social “problem,” and many of our selections are problem novels in the “new realism” mode. The course will be conducted as a seminar and participation is required.

Texts (Check with me before you buy books, since I’ll be making final selections later on):

Requirements:

Your grade will be determined by your writing and participation, and of course I’ll work closely with you.

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LIT 4334

Golden Age of Children’s Literature

Patricia Craddock

Information for this course may be obtained at the following site: Children’s Literature

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LIT 4535

Women and Popular Culture: Vamp to Vampire

Stephanie A. Smith

Although we all know what a woman is, and where the domain of popular culture lies, this course will begin with the assumption that we don’t. Across the semester, then, we will be involved in a critical investigation of two central questions: What is popular culture? and How is a “woman” constituted by and within popular culture?

In order to explore these questions, we will examine a range of “texts” that have served, and continue to serve, as central, defining objects of widespread fascination, both in the United States, and as exports to other countries across the globe

There will be four units to the class, each devoted to a sexual, iconographic figure: the vamp, the bombshell, the femme fatale and the dominatrix. Readings, for each unit will be taken from the following texts:

Requirements:

Additional information is available at: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/ssmith/pop99.html

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LIT 4554

Feminist Theories

Pam Gilbert

CROSS-LISTED WITH WST 4930, SECT. 5340

This course will cover a range of late twentieth-century feminist theories, focusing particularly on work with a direct bearing on literary theory. We will be especially attentive to the development of sucessive “waves” or “generations” of theory over the past few decades, examining the ways in which each wave depends on and critiques the one preceding it. Do we still “need” feminist theory? What does it mean, now, to work as a feminist? How does feminist theory intersect with questions of sexuality, race, class, and gender more generally?

Tenative Books/Readings:

Grading:

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LIT 4930

Nobel and Pulitzer Prize Winners, 1990–2001

Jim Haskins

Designed for upper-level English and Education majors, the course begins with an overview of the history of the Nobel and Pulitzer Prizes and the mechanisms by which winners are chosen each year. It then comprises reading and discussion of the winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature and the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, 1990-2001, exploring relationships among winners past and present in theme, structure, and criticism.

Required Readings:

The Nobel Prize for Literature is an international award for a writer’s body of work in a particular genre or genres. One work has been selected as reflective of the writer s body of work.

The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction is an American award, given to a writer for a particular work.

Assigned Supplementary Readings:

Nobel Prize Winners

Pulitzer Prize Winners

Assigned Oral Reports:

Individual and group classroom reports on authors and their works. All students will participate, either as individuals or in groups.

Written Assignment:

One research paper, not less than nor more than 20 typed, double-spaced pages, comparing any Nobel Prize-winning work with any Pulitzer Prize-winning work – due on the English Department office not later than 4pm Friday of “dead week.” A box with my name and course number will be available there for collection. Do not put papers on my office door.

Grading:

Grades will be determined on the following basis: 65% research paper; 25% oral reports, 10% class participation and attendance.

Office Hours:

Wednesdays, 10:30am-1:00pm, or before or after class Tuesdays and Thursdays
Turlington 4326
Office phone: 392-5429 ext. 256
e-mail: jhaskins@english.ufl.edu
Home phone: 378-4661. Calls accepted on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays, 4:00-7:00pm, and not at other times.

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LIT 4930

Queer Theory and Cultural Politics

Kim Emery

A general introduction to major concerns, methodologies, and texts in queer theory, this course also seeks to illuminate the theoretical insights of queer cultural work.

Students will be encouraged to explore the applicability of various theoretical paradigms and approaches to the concerns of queer cultural politics and to examine the usefulness of queer theoretical frames to the analysis of cultural politics more generally.

Required reading may include works by Judith Butler, Douglas Crimp, John D’Emilio, Lisa Duggan, Michel Foucault, Marilyn Frye, Kobena Mercer, Craig Owens, Cindy Patton, Gayle Rubin, Eve Sedgwick, Urvashi Vaid, Simon Watney, and Jeffrey Weeks. (Course packet of articles, plus 5 or 6 books).

Requirements:

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SPC 3605 Speechwriting

Ron Carpenter

Speechwriting is an advanced composition course wherein students acquire stylistic prowess by which their sentences have increased potential for memorability and quotability, ease and accuracy of comprehension, as well as overall persuasiveness. The course is called Speechwriting because models of eloquence to be imitated are in sentences of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, John Kennedy, and Martin Luther King, Jr., for examples. Although you practice these stylistic skills while writing speeches, the acquired prowess is applicable in virtually any future communication endeavors, as speakers or writers, regardless of profession.

This course is not about supporting arguments and organizing them into broader discourse. If you seek those skills, other courses are more appropriate. This course is about how to pick the best words and arrange them in their best orders – within sentences – to achieve optimal impress of your ideas upon readers or listeners. These stylistic skills are practiced and perfected in drafts that you aloud among peers (and for me) during our “lab” periods. During “labs,” you should acquire a sense of how to achieve the final product desired at the semester end. Thus, present drafts when due; listen carefully to other students’ drafts, comparing yours with theirs; participate in rewriting others’ sentences; and heed my commentary about all drafts. Do not assume that participation means simply presenting your drafts and listening only to commentary about them.

How a draft is presented, vocally and physically, has no bearing on your grade. Speechwriting is an advanced composition course, and drafts read aloud are bases of discussion by which students understand why some sentences are better than others. For initial and final drafts, I require word processing available in computer labs on campus (if you do not have your own computer). Revision on your disk is easier; spelling is accurate; and word lengths of drafts are known.

From past experience, I know that reasonably diligent students achieve some of the stylistic skills taught in this course. Final grades are higher, however, as you

  1. demonstrate refined prowess as the competent stylist on exams and in final drafts,
  2. understand course precepts derived from readings and lecture materials, as tested by three exams during the semester (the course has no final exam), and
  3. produce a final research paper about style as defined in this course (research paper options will be explained during a lecture relatively early in the semester and will require additional library reading).

Final grades are determined one-half by the average of your three exam scores and one-half by the quality of your final notebook with polished drafts of speeches and the research paper – all typed, double-spaced, and turned in during exam week at the time and date listed in the University Timetable as the course final exam period. The textbook for the course is Ronald H. Carpenter, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works.

Although this is a writing course, I also am impressed – for purposes of grades – by how much you know about our subject. Please understand that Speechwriting is unlike virtually all other persuasive writing courses at UF, for the expertise and confidence in precepts being taught are derived from your instructor’s published research in four scholarly press books, several book chapters, and numerous journal articles (all of which inform my textbook). Furthermore, from my experience as a consultant for organizations outside UF (such as corporate executives, lawyers, civic leaders, public relations professionals, and officers attending the U.S. Naval War College), I know that skills taught in this course are useful in the “real” world. Thus, teaching you to be eloquent stylists gives me great personal satisfaction. For I can make positive changes in your behaviors as communicators. If you join me in this endeavor, which admittedly entails some substantial effort on your part, I promise you will acquire valuable skills that will be useful for the rest of your life, no matter what your later profession might be. The only prerequisite for the course is that you can write grammatical sentences that are punctuated correctly.

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SPC 4680

Rhetorical Criticism: Masterpeices of Rhetoric

Ron Carpenter

4340 TUR, 392-9110 ext. 265
Email: <ronstyle@ufl.edu>
Office Hours: Tuesday and Thursday, 8:30–10:30

Rhetorical Criticism has as its focus several “masterpieces of rhetoric.” Although several of these are in the realm of political and presidential discourse, another focus this semester will be upon rhetorical efforts to persuade Americans to engage in armed conflict with other nations. Thus, students will examine how some speakers, writers, and film makers appealed successfully to specific attitudes and actions that had profound influence upon the course of events.

The primary goal of the course is to provide students will a refined sense of those rhetorical principles and techniques by which their own future discourse is more effective persuasively. Indeed, in keeping with the likelihood that several students in the class are anticipating careers in law, we also will devote a unit to legal rhetoric.

At the outset, however, please understand that “rhetoric” is not a pejorative word. In its current and inaccurate usage, the word often is prefaced with the adjective “empty” to disparage what “other” people say or write ostensibly as groundless emotional appeal in contradistinction to discourse that presumably only “tells it like it is.” But accurately, “rhetoric” refers to those means by which discourse “adjusts ideas to people and people to ideas.” So rhetoric is the art of persuasion, and rhetorical criticism identifies and assesses what was done with words (and other factors) to achieve persuasion.

The textbook this semester is Halford Ryan, Contemporary American Public Discourse: A Collection of Speeches and Critical Essays. It is available at Goerings Book Store, next to Bageland. Some additional textual materials in the form of Xerox copies can be purchased at the University Copy Center

Students will write at least four short papers (3–4 typed pages) that summarize and expand briefly upon assigned readings, films, or group projects. A longer final paper (8–10 typed pages) will report library research about some topic suggested by the course (the focus of that paper must be developed in consultation with your instructor). The course will have a “take home” final exam. Please understand that some group projects will require meetings with your student peers outside of the regular class periods. Students also are required to view some films outside of class.

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