Undergraduate Courses, Fall 2002

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Upper Division (3000–4000) Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

AML 3031

American Literature I: Contact Period to 1865

David Leverenz

This course will begin with a variety of short stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan Poe (you may be wearing a large scarlet “A” around your neck if you misspell his middle name as “Allen”!). In the next part of the course, we’ll compare three slave narratives by Olaudah Equiano, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Jacobs. We then will consider three novels, two extremely popular and one not so popular: Susannah Rowson’s Charlotte Temple (1793), Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) and Herman Melville’s Moby Dick (1851, probably excerpted). Yes, I know, most students balk at reading that formidable text, but I’ll try to convince you that it’s a jazz riff in prose, and funny too. The course will probably conclude with various poems by Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, unless students vote to read Emerson and Thoreau instead. I usually change the syllabus at least a little after the first week, when the introductory questionnaires tell me what you have already read and what you want to read.

The course will emphasize close readings and informal discussions. Work required: attendance, at least one short close-reading exercise in the first two weeks (1–2 pp., 5%), three comparative close readings (4–6 pp., 25% each), and weekly take-home quizzes/responses (20%). No final exam – I dislike giving them almost as much as I disliked taking them. I give A’s to essays using an original and spirited argument to illuminate complexities of language as well as theme. I give B+’s to well organized, well developed, relatively error-free essays with sparks of originality or daring, and B’s to competent essays needing more complex development and/or clearer focus. Lower grades mean greater problems with development, structure, and grammar. Recurrent grammatical errors lower the grade; spelling errors and typos don’t, within reason. The best essays sustain complex and/or audacious arguments; a good “B” essay capably summarizes and compares themes.

Grades will be based entirely on students’ writing. I don’t include class participation in the grading because I try to make class sessions non-judgmental and relaxed, so that anyone can try out ideas without feeling silly, weird, or stupid. To find out more, come by my office at 4362 Turlington. My office hours this Spring are Tuesday 12-2 p.m. and Thursday 12:40-1:40 p.m. Feel free to call me at home (371-7461, before 9:30 p.m.) or at the office (392-6650 x283), or e-mail me (Ldavid@english.ufl.edu).

toptop

AML 3041

American Literature II: 1865 to Present

Carl Bredahl

In this section of AML 3041 we will be focusing on changing perceptions of the individual with a social framework. We will read authors like Twain, Crane, and James in the late 19th Century and Frost, Stevens, Plath, Hemingway and Faulkner in the 20th.

Students will write weekly response papers [one page] to the assignments as well as two longer papers (5–7 pages). There will also be several quizzes and exams. The class format is discussion so all students are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the assignments.

toptop

AML 3270

African-American Literature I: Beginning to 1940

Harry Shaw

African-American Literature: Beginning to 1940 will provide a survey of the most historically and literarily significant writings of Black Americans from 1760 to 1940. Major authors include Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, Benjamin Banneker, Frederic K. Douglas, David Walker, Harriet Jacobs, Martin Delany, Nat Turner, Sojourner Truth, Charlotte Grimke, Charles Chesnutt, Paul Laurence Dunbar, W. E. B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington, James Weldon Johnson, Claude McKay, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Marcus Garvey, and Sterling A. Brown.

Students will be assigned several works for in-depth study of given authors, including supplementary xeroxed materials as necessary. The course work will consist of discussion of and writing about assigned readings, audio-visual presentations, oral reports and guest lecturers. Students will be expected to embellish their discussions, assigned papers, and tests with the help of critical essays available at the library or the Institute of Black Culture.

Students will be graded on performance on one major paper, tests, (mid-term and final) quizzes, classroom participation, attendance and punctuality.

Texts include:

toptop

AML 3271

African American Literature II

Mildred Hill-Lubin

Purpose: This course surveys the literary development of African American Literature from 1940 to the present. It begins with a review of the “Vernacular Tradition,” moves quickly to “Realism, Naturalism and Modernism” of the Forties and Fifties, includes the Black Arts Movement of the Sixties and early Seventies, and the Literary Renaissance of Black Women Writers.

Texts: The following texts may be purchased at the Campus Bookstore.

Requirements

  1. Assignments should be read before class and students are expected to attend class and participate in the class discussion and other activities of the course. Participation will count heavily where grade average is border line.
  2. Two quizzes over specific readings
  3. One critical paper

toptop

AML 3284

Faulkner’s Daughters

Anne Goodwyn Jones

Course description not available at this time.

toptop

AML 4170

Studies in American Literary Forms: William Faulkner and Modernist Fiction

Anne Goodwyn Jones

Course reading list

(Required texts are marked with an asterisk. Others are optional or alternative (e.g., the hefty Library of America multi-novel collections)

toptop

AML 4225

Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture: Race(ing) Through the Nineteenth Century

Malini J. Schueller

This course will focus on race as a signifier in nineteenth-century U.S. literature and culture. Taking race to be an ever-changing and adaptive social construct, we will focus both on the fluidity and mobility of racial categories, as well as their disciplinary powers. We will also examine the intersections between the discourses of race and sexuality and see how the two are mutually constitutive. Throughout the course, we will deal with some of the questions raised by the concept of race: What are the problems and gains of racial identity politics? How do questions of race and gender intersect/collide? What is the difference between the politics of race and ethnicity? By drawing on the diverse deployments of race in legal, literary, anthropological, and critical texts, this course will emphasize the importance of race in the reading of cultural texts as well as map some of the racial formations in the nineteenth century cultural imaginary. The course will focus on four aspects of race: racial mobilities, whiteness, race and sexuality, and blackface.

Tentative texts

Requirements

Weekly responses; oral presentation; two or three papers

toptop

AML 4242

Studies in Twentieth-Century American Literature and Culture

Tace Hedrick

This course will concentrate on the fiction and art which came out of the Latino Civil Rights movements of the 1960s and ’70s: Cèsar Chavez and the farmworkers movement, the Brown Power movement (El Movimiento), and the Nuyorican Young Lords movements of the ’60s and ’70s. As well, we will be looking at the art and writings of the Latina and Chicana feminist movements of the early 1970s.

Course material will include a history of the Civil Rights and Power movements, texts such as Oscar Zeta Acosta’s Revolt of the Cockroach People and Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo, Piri Thomas’s Down These Mean Streets, Chicana poet Lorna Dee Cervantes, the mural art of the time and work which came out of the Teatro Campesino such as Zoot Suit, and the early ’80s work of such writers as Cherr’e Moraga and Gloria Anzaldúa. We will finish with a look at the legacy of these movements in the work of contemporary Chicano and Latina artists of the ’90s and ’00s.

toptop

AML 4282

Black Women Writers: Novels

Mildred Hill-Lubin

Andree Nicola McLaughlin writes in Wild Women in the Whirlwind:

Who would have believed that the “Kidnapped African” would be the architect of a literary renaissance in a foreign land? Who would have expected that thrice within a margin of one hundred years after slavery’s abolition, the descendants of slaves – for whose forbears reading and writing were against the law – would produce some of the most widely read writers in the modern world? Who could have known that, following in the steps of the Harlem Renaissance, The Black Arts Movement, the “daughters of captivity” would become leading spokespersons of their own causes with international constituencies? The literary upsurge by Black women in the second half of the twentieth century unveils a renaissance of the spirit inspired by those who have refused to surrender. Those who have resisted their oppression. Those who have undertaken to remake the universe to own their future.

Purpose

To explore this phenomenon, the writing of contemporary African American Women Writers. We shall examine what, why, and how these women write as they testify to the concerns, frustrations, joy, experiences and triumphs of Black women today. Our focus will be the novel, but we will include a few short stories and criticisms. We will try to determine whether these writers represent a community, share similar interests, themes, styles, audiences. I have included an African author, Ama Ata Aidoo to introduce the African Diaspora concept. We shall address topics such as voice, self, identity, spirituality, sexuality, motherhood and other mothers, male-female relations; what it means to be a Black woman writer in America; the politics of publishing, womanism, feminisim, theory, and criticism. Above all, I want to hear your voice, your interests, your comments and criticism of these writers.

Texts

Requirements

Students are expected to attend class and participate in class discussions. Assignments should be read before the class discussions.

Credit

Two 1–2 page response papers 20%
Two quizzes over specific writings 40%
One final paper 15–20 pages 30%
Class attendance and participation 10%

toptop

AML 4311

Hemingway

Carl Bredahl

This section of 4311 will deal with the writings of Ernest Hemingway. We will read most of the novels published during his lifetime as well as a number of short stories. As for posthumous work, we’ll include Garden of Eden. The class will be discussion, and students will prepare weekly 1–2 page response papers on the assigned material. A longer paper will be due later in the term. Additionally, there will be a mid-term exam and a final, most probably a take home final. For both the longer paper and the take home final, students will make use of American Literary Scholarship, a bibliographic series available in the library.

toptop

AML 4453

American Protest Writing

Patricia Schmidt

Where are we going, Walt Whitman? The doors close in an hour.
Which way does your beard point tonight?
(I touch your book and dream of our odyssey in the supermarket and feel absurd.)
Will we walk all night through solitary streets? The trees add shade to shade, lights out in the houses, we’ll both be lonely.
Will we stroll dreaming of the lost America of love past blue Automobiles in driveways, home to our silent cottage?
Ah, dear father, graybeard, lonely old courage-teacher, what America did you have when Charon quit poling his ferry and you got out on a smoking bank and stood watching the boat disappear on the black waters of Lethe?

From “A Supermarket in California,” Allen Ginsberg, Berkeley, 1955

Vietnam protests, Camelot, the Johnson presidency, the rise of a counter-culture and the return of Richard Nixon – all are signatures of two decades that continue to beguile and frustrate thoughtful scholars and students alike. Remembered best, perhaps, is the disorder that erupted after the election of John Kennedy in 1960 and ended before Ronald Reagan became president in 1980. Intertwined in these decades are dual strands of idealism and cynicism, hope and despair. In a discussion of the sixties, though perhaps no more so than in any other age, the observer’s angle of vision is all. Unlike the equally complex but more homogeneously perceived drama of 1776 when, in John Adams’s idiom, thirteen clocks amazingly struck as one, the complexities and contradictions of the sixties virtually define the period, existing as they do within a grid of values that has shaped not only the observer’s perceptions but has itself been shaped by the period.

Such observations suggest a strong connection between the nature of social change and the role of the past. If the past is prologue – as I believe it is – what hieroglyphs remain and how are they to be explained? To compress such inquiries into one course is daunting. But by utilizing a variety of readings, lectures, and film footage from 1950-1970, I believe that we can learn a great deal about such phenomena as the Vietnam Anti-War Protests, the Civil Rights Movement, feminism, and the counter-culture. In the process, I would like us to come away with a deeper understanding of the ways in which our experiences shape the narrative structures by which we tell ourselves about our world, and the connection of such structures to the creation of meaning, both in fiction and nonfiction.

Several articles, book excerpts, and primary documents will be placed on reserve. Writing assignments will consist of a 5–7 page essay, a research project prospectus, and a research paper. Viewing history through the lens of literature, and reading literature through the lens of history, creates a dialectic that should enrich our understanding of both, providing insight into the social changes that are still Blowin’ in the Wind.

Texts

Additional Readings

Recommended

Films

Assignments

Written assignments include one short essay, a research project prospectus, and a research paper. All papers must be double-spaced with title pages, endnotes or textual notes (MLA or Chicago) and must include complete bibliographies. Late papers earn a drop of one letter grade for each day late.

Short Paper: (5 to 7 pages) 20 points. Due week four of the course. Carefully striving for a balance between liberal and conservative views, select a moment in the decade – the 1962 admission of James Meredith to the University of Mississippi; the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; the July 1967 riots in Newark and Detroit; the 1969 Woodstock Music and Art Fair; Eugene McCarthy’s decision in 1968 to enter the race for president; the anti-war “moratorium” of October 15, 1969; the May 4, 1970 slaying of students on the campus of Kent State. Compare the reporting of this event by Fortune, U.S. News, The National Observer to that of The New Republic, Harper’s, Rolling Stone, Time, Newsweek. Any illusion of mimesis (an accurate copy) of reality will be challenged as you read these articles. Discuss this phenomenon. Attention must be directed to the way that language acts as a vehicle for mediating between external reality and cultural expectations. From what set of assumptions (about order, hierarchy, military might, etc.) did the writers, whose work you consulted, most likely begin? How are they reflected in his/her structure of ideas, examples, metaphors, evidence?

Research Project: (15 to 20 pp) 50 points. Due two weeks before the end of the semester. This project is an extension of the one above. The topic must receive the approval of the instructor and should again draw on primary sources. A one-page prospectus that outlines the topic, explains the approach being used and the questions considered, as well as a discussion of relevant information about sources, will be required by week eight. In this paper, you are being asked to look for what Alfred North Whitehead called “the curves of history”? Utilizing the concepts discusssed above, your focus will shift to the larger canvas of which the above events are a part. Topics may range from contemporary reportage of: the consumerism of the fifties, the growth of the counter-culture, the role of the beats, and the push for sexual freedom, to an assessment of literary tastes, reportage of the 1968 presidential (Republican or Democratic) race, campus protest, the environmental or gay or women’s movement, etc. Your assignment is to explore the “idea of the variable... and rate of change” during a particular time in the twentieth century and articulate the ways in which representations of such changes became “partial truths.” During the last two weeks of the class, you will be asked to discuss your process of discovery and the specific insights gleaned from your research with the class. Plagiarism, the undocumented use of someone else’s work, will not be tolerated and will result in a flunking grade. If you do not know how or when to cite a source, see me.

Quizzes, homework, etc.: 15 points

Class participation: 15 points

toptop

AML 4685

Race and Ethnicity in American Literature and Culture: African American Drama

Mark A. Reid

What makes dramas written by Black American playwrights and theater collectives different from those written and or performed by such writers and theater collectives as Arthur Miller, Sam Shepard, Richard Foreman, Laurie Anderson, Judith Malina and Julian Beck’s Living Theatre and Peter Brook’s International Centre of Theater Research?

Using recent theoretical and political debates on the construction of identity, and culling information from recent theater journals as TDR, this seminar traces the historical trajectory of black dramatic writing and performance. Discussion will situate plays, playwrights and dramatic strategies within a (inter)national(ist) context(s). Thus, the seminar also has as one of its purposes the discussion of the various national and international movements that affect both American and international drama.

The course covers representative works from the Theater of the Black Experience, the Black Arts Movement, The Free Southern Theatre, and the Black avant-garde and experimentalist stage. Readings may include works by such playwrights as Langston Hughes, Lorraine Hansberry, Ed Bullins, Amiri Baraka, Adrienne Kennedy, Ben Caldwell, P.J. Gibson, August Wilson, George C. Wolfe and such performance artists as Fred Holland, Robbie McCauley, John O’Neal, Whoopi Goldberg and Anna Deavere Smith.

In writing their research papers, students must create their own gumbo-like theory of lived and imagined forms of an inclusive and or exclusionary constructions of black experience as it has been represented in a particular group of plays or performance artists.

Requirements

Class Assignment Percentage
Pop quizzes on weekly readings as well as film(s) screened in the previous class 20%
Moderate a ten-minute discussion on a weekly assignment 20%
Submission of a typed one-page outline of the analytical research paper and one-page bibliography 10%
Submission of a typed 8–10 page analytical research paper and bibliography 30%
A ten-minute oral presentation on the 8–10 page analytical paper 20%

toptop

CRW 3110

Reading and Writing Short Stories

David Leavitt

What is a short story? No genre has so consistently eluded definition. Stories can range from eighty pages (Thomas Mann’s “Death in Venice”) to a single sentence (Amy Hempel’s “Housewife”). The purpose of this seminar will be to explore the parameters of this seductive and evasive form, from the standpoint both of the practitioner and the reader.

The seminar will be built around the idea that writers learn by reading. Therefore you may find the reading load heavier than is typical for a fiction workshop. Each week you will be asked to read a selection of stories by an English or American writer, and to arrive in class prepared to discuss them cogently. This conversation will take up roughly a third of our allotted time; the other two-thirds will be devoted to discussion of your own work (presented according to a pre-arranged schedule) and occasional in-class exercises.

For the first several weeks, I’ll be giving you assignments of a vaguely experimental nature – for instance, to tell a story from the viewpoint of an historical figure of your own choosing (Janis Joplin, Jack the Ripper). You’ll then set to work on stories of your own devising, which may have evolved from these exercises. The requirement of the class, in terms of writing, is that you complete two stories, the first by midterm and the second by term’s end. (The second may be an outgrowth of the first.) It goes without saying that attendance is mandatory, and that failure to show up (along with failure to do the reading) will have an adverse effect on your final grade. Grading will be based on your informed participation in the seminar, the critical acuity you show when judging other students’ writing, and your willingness to work hard: to be the best writer you can be, and to emerge at the end of the semester a better writer than you were at the beginning.

The reading many include stories by John Cheever, William Trevor, Alice Munro, Flannery O’Connor, Grace Paley, Deborah Eisenberg, Allan Gurganus, Amy Hempel and W.G. Sebald.

Final note: although flexibility is essential to any writing workshop, so is structure. The same can be said – and must be said – of the writing process.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To be admitted to upper-division creative writing courses for Fall 2002, you must submit an example of your creative writing to the instructor of the course you wish to take. (Instructor mailboxes are in Turlington 4301.) For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, you must submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, you must submit one short story. Manuscripts must be submitted no later than Friday, March 15th, 2002.

Your manuscript must be accompanied by the following:

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, approximately two weeks after the deadline. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

toptop

CRW 3310

Poetry Workshop

William Logan

“Poorly depicted clouds – which most people would not notice as wrong – are so disturbing to Dr. Thornes that they almost spoil visits to museums. For a meteorologist, the distraction is as great as the ordinary viewer being confronted by a figure with three arms... [He added that] too many artists had painted [clouds] as they would a backcloth in a theatre.” – The Guardian (London), 9 August 2000

In this workshop we will attend to words as closely as a painter attends to paint – or to clouds. You will read a broad selection of modern poetry, from Emily Dickinson to Gjertrud Schnackenberg, and write a poem a week. Every week the workshop will consider for discussion poems from the past and poems from students.

This is an advanced workshop in poetry, for students who have already taken the intermediate workshop (CRW 2300) and want to press their understandings of poetic language even further. Early admission is by manuscript.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To be admitted to upper-division creative writing courses for Fall 2002, you must submit an example of your creative writing to the instructor of the course you wish to take. (Instructor mailboxes are in Turlington 4301.) For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, you must submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, you must submit one short story. Manuscripts must be submitted no later than Friday, March 15th, 2002.

Your manuscript must be accompanied by the following:

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, approximately two weeks after the deadline. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

toptop

CRW 4905

Independent Work in Fiction

Padgett Powell

This course is the last in our series of undergraduate workshops in fiction writing. Its objective is to help you or make you write fiction better, arguably the objective of any workshop worth anything. As the last of our courses, however, this one seeks to make the three or four fictions you can show off, apply to graduate programs with, or publish. This is the time to prepare manuscripts for submission to graduate schools in writing if you are intending to suffer such a fate. This is also the time you become the best undergraduate writer of fiction you can become.

Standard workshop format. I anticipate full efforts at writing well, at criticizing for the benefit of others, at attending religiously, at speaking cogently when you can, at surrounding yourself in the mantle of intelligent reticence when you can’t.

We will read two books of fiction as technical models.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To be admitted to upper-division creative writing courses for Fall 2002, you must submit an example of your creative writing to the instructor of the course you wish to take. (Instructor mailboxes are in Turlington 4301.) For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, you must submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, you must submit one short story. Manuscripts must be submitted no later than Friday, March 15th, 2002.

Your manuscript must be accompanied by the following:

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, approximately two weeks after the deadline. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

toptop

CRW 4906

Poetry Workshop

William Logan

“There are four-and-twenty changes in a linnet’s song. It’s one of the beautifullest songbirds we’ve got. It sings ‘toys’ as we call them; that is, it makes sounds which we distinguish in the fancy as the tollock eeke eeke quake le wheet; single eke eke quake wheets; or eek eek quake chowls; eege pipe chowl: laugh; eege poy chowls; rattle; pipe; fear; pugh and poy.” – from Mayhew’s London
“The south-east coast of Van Dieman’s Land resembles a biscuit at which rats have been nibbling.” – Marcus Clarke, His Natural Life

The object of poetry is to find the equivalent in language for things seen and felt. This workshop will ask you to write at least a dozen poems, one per week, and to read a broad selection of modern poetry, from Robert Frost to poems published this year. Each week the workshop will discuss your work and the work of your predecessors.

This is Florida’s most advanced workshop in poetry, for students who hope to become poets and possibly attend an MFA program. Students from this class have gone on to The University of Iowa, University of Virginia, Columbia University, University of Michigan, and other programs. The prerequisite is CRW 3310. Advance admission is by manuscript and permission of the instructor.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To be admitted to upper-division creative writing courses for Fall 2002, you must submit an example of your creative writing to the instructor of the course you wish to take. (Instructor mailboxes are in Turlington 4301.) For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, you must submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, you must submit one short story. Manuscripts must be submitted no later than Friday, March 15th, 2002.

Your manuscript must be accompanied by the following:

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, approximately two weeks after the deadline. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

toptop

ENC 3250

Professional Communication

Wayne Losano

This upper-division professional communication course will consist of an intense review of grammar, mechanics, and style appropriate to writing in the “real” (as opposed to the acadedemic) world, with an emphasis on concreteness and economy. Topics covered include the publication of professional articles, conference and other oral presentations, proposal writing, short communication formats (nonformal reports, business letters, etc.) and graphics. Four or five papers plus in-class writing/editing exercises.

toptop

ENC 3254

Professional Writing in the Discipline

Variable

Call 392-5421: Except for 3 sections that are reserved for Education majors, this course is offered out of the Dial Center for Written and Oral Communication.

toptop

ENC 3310

Advanced Exposition

Wayne Losano

This is a standard, traditional (old-fashioned) composition course focussing on familiar rhetorical modes of development (narrative, description, analysis, etc.) with a heavy emphasis on style and rhetorical effectiveness. Four or five papers plus analysis of selected essays and assorted in-class writing activities.

toptop

ENC 3312

Advanced Argumentative Writing

Patricia Schmidt

One purpose of this course is to develop skills which will enable you to frame arguments which carry real weight and to develop confidence in deciding the strength of arguments made by others. To do so requires us to be able to demonstrate clearly the reasons for our beliefs and cogency of logical inference.

What we are “about” is more than that, however. In the words of Wayne C. Booth and Marshall W. Gregory, the authors of the text we shall use for the course, we are “moral agents attempting to do something in or to the world.” Thus, it is hoped that in addition to skills, this course will nourish the quality of thought which underlies good writing through readings selected for the course and through class discussions.

Robert Maynard Hutchins tells a story which nicely addresses the need for this second loftier goal:

My father came home from India about thirty years ago with the story of a British woman who was plagued to death by the questions of her Indian servant. Finally she said to him, “Why don’t you use your common sense?” He replied, “Lady, common sense is the gift of God; I have only a technical education.”

Argumentation is a good deal more than a skill. The rhetorical assumptions which undergird it comprise a habit of mind. The course will be informed by an exploration of those rhetorical assumptions.

Texts

Requirements

Papers must be typed and double-spaced with title pages. A bibliography and footnotes (or endnotes) should be used where appropriate. If the paper is late, its grade drops one letter grade for every day late. Staple or clip the pages. No binder or covers, please.

This is a demanding course so be prepared to work.

toptop

ENC 3414

Hypermedia

Gregory Ulmer

ENC 3414 treats the World Wide Web in particular, and the internet in general, as an object of study worthy of the same critical and theoretical attention as that given to cinema and television. We will be concerned not only with the new forms of art and entertainment emerging online, but also with the internet as a new “public sphere,” a new site in which citizens participate in the making of collective as well as of personal meaning and identity. We will gain some perspective by placing the invention of the web in the context of the cultural transformations associated with film and print (the screen and the page). The projects for the semester focus on the similarity among the features of digital media, creative thinking, and entertainment narratives. ENC 3414 is taught in a computerized classroom, and all assignments involve making websites. No previous experience with computing (other than word processing) is required.

toptop

ENC 4260

Advanced Professional Writing: Scholarly Writing

Jane Douglas

This web-based writing course covers most things you’ll need to know to write publication-worthy research papers in a variety of disciplines, as well as how to translate your research into readable prose that can be understood by grants foundations and the general public alike. Along the way, you’ll learn the stylistic and organizational strategies for writing clear, efficient, and highly effective sentences, paragraphs, and documents. And you’ll also learn everything from how to formulate a robust hypothesis to how to handle your research discussion when your outcomes haven’t quite panned out as you expected. Assignments include a 5–7 page grant proposal, an abstract, and a 15–20 page research article, as well as four peer evaluations of your classmates’ work. Recommended for students writing honors theses and University Scholars Program students.

toptop

ENG 3010

Theory and Practice of Modern Criticism

Don Ault

This course is intended as a survey of some of the major critical theories and methods of the twentieth century. There will be a good deal of reading, and in order to make sure you are keeping up with the reading, there will probably several in-class quizzes, always announced in advance. You must take and pass a majority of the quizzes administered in order to pass the course. Your final grade will be based primarily on three or four writing assignments and a take-home comprehensive final exam. With permission from me you may submit a final paper to substitute for the final exam. Your final grade will reflect my assessment of your comprehension and articulation of the various theories and methods we will be studying, with an emphasis on your original insights into these critical texts. Because I would like to conduct the class as much as possible as a discussion rather than a lecture, productive class participation can make a significant difference in your grade. I will take attendance and use my own discretion in weighing it into your final grade. I usually do not use a reasonable number of absences punitively, but I try to give some extra credit for excellent attendance in relation to those students whose grade is on the borderline.

Required texts

toptop

ENG 3115

Introduction to Film Criticism and Theory

Scott Nygren

This course will introduce current theoretical contexts for engaging the contemporary media environment, and will consider the writing of theoretical texts and the making of new films as parallel activities.

We will study world media through close visual analysis of individual films, stressing the historical and international diversity of cinematic approaches and styles. At the same time, we will study contemporary critical writing on film and its basis in the larger domain of cultural theory. Emphasis will be on such basic issues as audience identification, social formations and cultural context as articulated through a series of post-structural, postcolonial and postmodern methodologies. After introducing phenomenology and structuralism as points of departure, the class will consider psychoanalysis, ideology, deconstruction, discourse, gender and race en route to postcolonial and postmodern approaches.

Our principle purpose will be to investigate the conjuncture of theoretical issues with an experience of specific film texts, and the function of these texts in the past and present workings of history, especially as this leads towards questions for future production and study. The working assumption here is that alphabetic writing and film production both constitute modes of inscription, and represent two ways of embodying the same cultural process.

Mastery of so many topics is neither possible nor expected. The goal is to understand the conditions and motives that led to the rethinking of media, and to initiate theoretical strategies in your own work. Two papers of 8-10 pages each plus class discussion are required.

toptop

ENG 3121

History of Film I

Nora Alter

(Cross-listed with GET 2290.1957)

History of Film I will survey the silent era of film from 1895 to sound film (1927).

toptop

ENG 4015

Psychological Approaches to Literature

Peter L. Rudnytsky

This course will provide students with an introduction to major currents in psychoanalytic theory through readings in Freud, Klein, Winnicott, Lacan, Bowlby, and others. The literary texts to be read from various psychoanalytic perspectives are Oedipus the King, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Othello, Frankenstein, and Philip Roth’s Portnoy’s Complaint and My Life as a Man. The course requirements are a midterm, final, and an eight- to ten-page term paper, as well as a nongraded weekly journal entry. Regular attendance and active participation in class discussions are also expected.

toptop

ENG 4060

History of the English Language

Marie Nelson

Focus: ENG 4060: History of the English Language, as I teach it, is a lit-lang course.

Texts: Our basic language text will be Whitney Bolton’s A Living Language (if this text is available Fall 2002), possibly extended by David Crystal’s Language and the Internet. Its basic literature text will be my Readings for History of the English Language, supplemented by selections from a series I call the EX-Files (for Exercise Files). Occasional sequences from Robert MacNeill’s “Story of English” video series will also be presented.

Tests: Short essay answer tests will be included within the units into which the language history is conventionally divided – Old English, Middle English, Renaissance English, Eighteenth-century English, and Varieties of American English. Midterm and final examinations will provide opportunity for comparative analysis of texts from different stages of the development of the English language. We may, in addition, have a short diagnostic test sometime during the second or third week of the term.

Prerequisites: There is no prerequisite for this 4000-level course. The kind of introduction to speech sounds and their written representation, to processes of word formation, and to sentence structure you may have encountered in LIN 2000 or LIN 3010 could, however, prove useful. In any case, we will give brief attention to these topics as we begin our study of the history of the English language.

Grading policy: Except for the early diagnostic test, everything – exercises, tests, quizzes, attendance, general participation – counts. In making final decisions about grades, I will be more concerned with the degree of analytical skill you can demonstrate at the end than with where you were at the beginning of the term.

toptop

ENG 4130

Race and Ethnicity in Film

Mark A. Reid

This course employs a comparative approach to study narrative and non-narrative films made about Blacks. Most of the screenings will be films made by African filmmakers (i.e., filmmakers who are citizens of an African country). However, the course also includes a few films directed by such European-based filmmakers as Claire Denis, Mathieu Kassovitz, Med Hondo, John Akomfrah, Karim Dridi and Gurinder Chadha.

Lectures and discussions will consider how the films explore conflicts between one generation of Africans and another that may result from migration, globalization and western educated African youths. Ideas about ethnicity, race, nation, class, gender and sexuality will be discussed in relation to how they transform notions about Africa and Africans. Additionally, the class will examine how movies construct different narrative forms as comedy, melodrama, documentary, by using both verbal and visual narrative strategies. Students will learn and correctly employ film and theoretical terminology when they discuss and write about film.

Students will analyze how various types of films imitate, appropriate and or resist the dominant representational regimes and film genres. The course introduces students to the critical study of African cinema using postcolonial theory and contemporary film history. Students will hopefully leave this course with a sharpened critical understanding of how filmmakers and video artists visually imitate, appropriate, and or resist certain dominant representational paradigms.

Requirements

Pop quizzes on weekly readings and the film(s) screened in the previous class 20%
Moderate one ten-minute discussion on a weekly assignment 20%
Submission of a typed one-page outline of the analytical research paper and one-page bibliography 10%
Submission of a typed 8-10 page analytical research paper and bibliography 30%
A ten-minute oral presentation on the 8-10 page analytical paper 20%

toptop

ENG 4133

New German Cinema: 1945–Present

Nora Alter

(Cross-listed with GET 4293.0279)

This course, cross-listed with German Studies, European Studies and Jewish Studies, will look at how the Holocaust is represented in post-WW II European films. Current debates of how history, memory and representation are interwoven will provide the theoretical framework. In addition we will be concerned with how genre – documentary, drama, comedy, neorealism, etc. – influences representation. Films shown will include: Germany Year Zero, The Murderers Are Among Us, Night and Fog, Zentropa, Europa Europa, The Night Porter, Cabaret, In the Garden of the Fitzi Continis, Jacob the Liar, Life is Beautiful, and Germany Pale Mother.

toptop

ENG 4134

Women and Film

Maureen Turim

This course will examine how women have been represented in film, how they have participated in film production and how they consume film images. We will look at several feminist approaches and the range of debates as to how to address these issues. The course will have several goals: to introduce you to the history of women in film, to increase your skills in reading film, in reading critical writing about film, and in understanding the relation between writing critical analysis and feminist theory.

Emphasis will be on such basic issues as viewer identification, social values and cultural context as currently formulated through various feminist and post-structuralist methodologies. We will explore how feminism intersects with psychoanalysis, ideology, deconstruction and related approaches. We will examine the conjuncture of theoretical issues with an experience of specific texts, and the function of these texts in the past and present workings of history.

Requirements

Two papers of 8 pages each (35% and 35%), plus class discussion and miscellaneous assignments (30%). Participation in class discussion is essential.

toptop

ENG 4135

National Cinemas: The Cinema of Italy

Mary Watt

(Cross-listed with ITT 3521.5766)

From the hardships of occupied Rome to London in the “swinging sixties,” Italian cinema has captured the most emblematic moments in modern history on film. This course looks at how and why directors such as De Sica, Fellini and Rossellini have become internationally reknowned and why their films have become timeless classics. We will also consider how subsequent directors – Michelangelo Antonioni, Sergio Leone and now, Roberto Benigni – have carried on the Italian tradition of excellence. For more information see the course home page at http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/watt/cinemad.html.

toptop

ENG 4135

National Cinemas: European Cinemas

Maureen Turim

How has European cinema evolved? This course will treat the national traditions of Western, Central, and Eastern Europe comparatively. Each European cinematic tradition was always highly aware of, receptive to and competitive with the productions of the various component countries of Europe. The interaction between French and Polish filmmakers, or Swedish and German filmmakers, for example, was always significant. Spanish filmmakers made films with a French audience in mind, and sometimes in exile in France; this is just one example of the ways nations as political boundaries are only one way of considering the map of Europe. Now that European production often involves co-productions (for example France and Italy) and Europe has formed an economic union, the question of the European cinema as an interactive tradition is more important than ever. This course will concentrate on films that engage this dialogue between nations, and films that found their reception far beyond the national identities of their filmmakers. For those students who already have taken courses in various national cinemas, this course will allow you to expand your knowledge of how those traditions work internationally and historically. This course will also provide an introduction to several key stylistic movements of European cinema and the social and political contexts of these films.

Course Requirements

Two papers of 8 pages each (35% and 35%), plus class discussion and miscellaneous assignments (30%). Participation in class discussion is essential.

toptop

ENG 4136

Hypervideo: Reinventing Video Production

Scott Nygren

This course derives from a double convergence in contemporary media culture. On the one hand, cultural theory and innovative artistic practices now regularly overlap and exchange techniques. On the other hand, computers and video have now merged so that video has become one of many possible inputting devices into an electronic space. Based on these convergences, the class will map the creative and conceptual possibilities of working in new contexts.

The course will not teach traditional documentary, experimental or narrative uses of video as such, but will reinvent these approaches in order to produce visually articulate and engaging video in a contemporary world context. We will be shooting video on digital video cameras and processing footage with desktop computers, primarily through Final Cut Pro on Macintosh G4s. The implication of such high-quality but low-cost desktop equipment, for the purposes of this course, is to make current technology available on an individualized basis for innovation and research. Much of the semester will be spent developing stategies for effectively using this equipment, and your participation will form a significant part of the course.

Four short assignments on videotape, an oral presentation, and a final project on videotape will be required. All final projects will be presented in a public screening at the end of the semester, organized and run by students in the class.

toptop

ENG 4905

Independent Study

Faculty Member of Choice

An Independent Study course may be taken for 1- to 3-credit hours and will count as credit toward the English major. This course may be repeated with a change of topic up to a maximum of 9 credits.

.

This course is for advanced students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The student must find a faculty member who is willing to supervise the semester-long study, and together, the two create a project. The student must meet with the professor at designated times, agreed upon in advance, and complete all assignments in a timely manner.

toptop

ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Mark Twain

David Leverenz

Note: at least a 3.5 GPA required.

This course will discuss Mark Twain’s fiction and autobiographical writings. Most of our class time will be devoted to in-depth discussions and close readings of Twain’s major texts: Innocents Abroad, Roughing It, The Gilded Age (co-authored), Life on the Mississippi, Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, Pudd’nhead Wilson, his Autobiography. We will also read selections from Twain’s short stories and his later writings, e.g., “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” “Private History of a Campaign that Failed,” “The Man Who Corrupted Hadleyburg,” the “Diaries of Adam and Eve”, “The Mysterious Stranger,” and the “Hellfire Hotchkiss” fragment. We will also consider Twain as the first “celebrity author” in the United States. How does his writing both critique and encourage the consolidation of an imperial nation-state after the Civil War? How is Twain a Southern and Western as well as a national writer, and does living in Hartford have anything to do with that? How do racial and gender tensions structure and unsettle our reading experiences of his texts? Why did his evocations of regional nostalgia and “bad boys” have such appeal? When and why is he so funny? Why was Joan of Arc his favorite among all his books? In his last years, why did he have a bevy of prepubescent girls whom he called his “Angelfish”? And why, at the same time, do his writings become so bleak, bitter, and cynical about what he called “the damned human race”?

We will also read some criticism analyzing issues of race and gender in several of Twain’s texts, and we’ll examine Jonathan Arac’s recent book attacking The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Students will be expected to incorporate relevant criticism into their final projects. For most of the double periods, students in groups of two or three will begin our discussions with oral presentations, either to suggest an argument about an aspect of the text, or to introduce issues and topics that might spark further discussion. Writing required: two comparative close readings (25% each) and a research essay of 15–18 pp. (50%). If discussion falters, I will require weekly quizzes and alter the grading percentages. I hope that won’t be necessary in an Honors class. I’ll require attendance, and I won’t give a final exam.

If you have any questions, please e-mail me at Ldavid@english.ufl.edu, or give me a call at 352-392-6650 x 283, or call me at home, 371-7461, before 9:30 p.m. Or you can come by my office at 4362 Turlington; I’m there most days. My office hours this spring are Tuesday 12–2 p.m. and Thursday 12:40–1:40 p.m.

toptop

ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Thoreau/Rohmer

Robert Ray

This seminar will focus on Thoreau’s Walden, especially in its relation to three themes:

– The Trials of Vocation: Transcendentalism, and especially Emerson’s version of it, greatly raised the stakes involved in choosing a career. In fact, it disrupted its adherents, challenging them to make lives that would enable the virtues Emerson preached. As a result, as one writer has noticed, “all Emerson’s young men had trouble in choosing careers.” Walden records Thoreau’s efforts to invent a vocation that will satisfy not only his own inclinations, but also Emerson’s challenge. Readings: Walden, a Thoreau biography, two Emerson essays, Sartre’s “Existentialism Is a Humanism” (a short lecture), and a movie by Eric Rohmer.

– The Channels of Purity: In one sense, Thoreau never hesitated o sacrifice vocation to calling. He was, from the start, intent on revelation, and having renounced religion and school as its means (just as he had abandoned them as careers), he had to start over. If “Man flows at once to God when the channel of purity is open,” as he wrote in Walden, the question lay in discovering the rules for such permanent availability. Thoreau’s solution turned on a reverential attention to the everyday world around him: “Let us not underrate the value of a fact,” he famously declared; “it will one day flower in a truth.” Readings: selections from Thoreau’s Journals, selections from Wordsworth, one Surrealist book (either Breton’s Nadja or Aragon’s Paris Peasant), and one Rohmer movie.

– The Mosaic: All of Thoreau’s “books” were mosaics, costructed out of journal entries written over a period of years, what one critic has called “modular blocks that can be placed in new relations with others composed in entirely discrete moods and moments” (almost a recipe for filmmaking). Thoreau anticipates the modern propensity for collage and fragments, and for writers like Nietzsche, Benjamin, and Barthes. Readings: one essay by Benjamin, Barthes’s autobiography.

Assignments

Two medium-length papers.

toptop

ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Introduction to Postcolonial Theory

Malini J. Schueller

By the beginning of the twentieth century, a few European powers – mainly Britain and France – had colonized 80% of Asia and Africa. Nationalist movements during the latter half of the century led to territorial, but not necessarily cultural and intellectual decolonization. The cultural effects of colonialism, both on colonizers and colonized, constitute the field of postcolonial studies. This course is an introduction to the enormously influential field of postcolonial studies. We will study the ways in which postcolonial theory has intersected with and impacted diverse areas of inquiry such as feminism, historiography, culture, and ethnography. At the same time, this course will stress the importance of historicizing postcoloniality. The course will focus on four concerns central to postcolonial studies: the nature of colonial discourse, the strength of postcolonial rewritings, the articulation of revolutionary national consciousness, the relationship of postcolonial studies to feminist theories, and the changing nature of postcoloniality in light of the “globalization” of culture. We will read the works of major revolutionaries and theorists and the debates and arguments about these works.

In keeping with the wide range covered by postcolonial studies, the course will engage with a variety of cultural materials: popular films, a documentary, a novel, a testimonial, essays, and discourses about the veil. We will also deal with writings from and about the major parts of the world affected by imperialism: Europe, Asia, Africa, and Central America. A major goal of the course will be to see how postcolonial theory can be instrumental in affecting changes in conditions of oppression today.

Texts Available at Goerings Bookstore

Requirements

Weekly responses, two 8–10 page papers or one long paper, attendance

toptop

ENG 4940

Internship

Undergraduate Coordinator

Students must have completed at least 12 hours of 3000- to 4000-level English courses

For students who want to gain experience in an English-related field. Students must find a business that will provide adequate supervision by a delegated authority in an appropriate work area. An initial description of the position from the intern, an outline on of the intern’s duties on the letterhead of the business, a final summary from the intern discussing the merits of the position, and a final evaluation from the business offering the intership. S/U option only. May be taken for 1 to 3 credit hours, depending on the number of hours worked during the week. See undergraduate academic advising in the English department for the guidelines.

toptop

ENG 4953

Department Seminar: English and Englishness

Apollo Amoko

This course examines the enduring centrality of nationalist paradigms in contemporary literary studies. To cite the example that will be at the heart of our inquiry: the common periodization of English Literature in epochs such as Medieval, Renaissance, Augustan, or Victorian makes sense only if the organization of the discipline is pegged to a certain national history of England. It will be my contention that there are no legitimate aesthetic or historical grounds for yoking the study of English literature to that nationalist history. Further, I will contend that a dubious nationalist mandate is reproduced rather than contested when such “other” national/“continental” literatures in English as American, African, Caribbean and so on are belatedly and uncritically appended to a nationalist English tradition. Our goal will be to unburden the study of literature of the weight of nationalist histories. We will attempt to take seriously the proposition that English literature, far from embodying the long narrative of England’s national history, is a remarkably recent colonial invention. What is the historical evidence for this argument? What alternate periodization might we suggest for resolutely non-nationalist English literary studies? Readings for this course will consist entirely of theoretical and critical texts. My hypothesis will be that the study of specific literary texts ought to be deferred until the conceptual grounds for the study of English literature has been sufficiently clarified.

The authors to be studied may include Matthew Arnold, F. R. Leavis, Raymond Williams, Terry Eagleton, Brian Doyle (whose book provides the title for this course), Chris Baldick, Robert Crowford (editor of The Scottish Invention of English Literature), Gauri Viswanathan, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Simon Gikandi, Gerald Graff, David Shamway and John Guillory. We may also focus on a recent special of the PMLA 116: 1 (January 2001) “Globalizing Literary Studies.”

toptop

ENG 4970

Honors Thesis Project

Faculty Members (2) of Choice

Students must have completed at least one semester of ENG 4936, Honors Seminar. Open to English Honors students.

The student must select two faculty members: one to direct the reading, research, and writing of a thesis on a topic of the student’s and director’s chosing, and another as the second reader. An abstract (100 to 200 words) and one copy of the thesis (30 to 50 pages) must be delivered to the CLAS Academic Advising Center on Fletcher Road at least 10 days before graduation.

toptop

ENL 3112

Eighteenth-Century English Fiction

Alistair Duckworth

We will discuss novels by such major figures as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, and Austen and extracts from other writers of prose such as Bunyan, Swift, Addison, Boswell, and Burney. Central to our concerns will be an evaluation of the aesthetic character and cultural role of the novel. We will approach novels by way of two approaches: a Bakhtinian approach affirming the novel’s orientation toward the future; and a Foucauldian approach viewing the novel as an agent of bourgeois discipline. The format of the course is lecture and discussion – with discussion warmly encouraged.

Written requirements are quizzes, mid-term and final examinations, and two papers of 2000–2500 words.

Note: This course has a strict attendance policy. It meets once a week for three hours; students who sign up for courses (e.g. finance courses) that hold one or more assembly exams on Wednesday nights should avoid conflict by not signing up for this course.

toptop

ENL 3122

The English Novel: Nineteenth Century
Popular Fiction as Political Discourse

Julian Wolfreys

Sexuality, gender, criminality, the empire, the women’s movement and women’s rights, discourses of science, political reformation: these are some of the contemporary issues to be addressed in the novels read for this course. In examining such issues and themes, along with the fictional representation of historical events such as the Crimean War or political debates concerning divorce, this course will emphasize the ways in which the English Novel in the nineteenth century, particularly in the second half of the century, functions both as a form of popular entertainment and as a polemical and ideological medium, providing a forum for discussion of hotly debated issues of the period.

Texts

toptop

ENL 3210

Studies in Middle English Literature

R. Allen Shoaf

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with English literature of the period 1300–1475 (attending also to principal sources and influences from earlier periods) and to introduce them to the main issues of current scholarly debate about the literature of the period. Readings include selections from Virgil, Ovid, St. Augustine, Boethius, the Pearl-poet, Chaucer, Malory, and various anonymous writers of the period.

The design of the course reflects a movement from the simple and preparatory to the increasingly complex and advanced. The amount of reading early in the course, if we look to number of pages only, is not particularly large; as the course progresses, however, the amount and the difficulty of the reading increase steadily, culminating in reading at least one text in the original Middle English (all other texts in the course are in translation). In keeping with this design, the final paper in the course is the item that counts most in determining a student’s final mark (roughly 40%): the work of the course aims toward preparing the student to write a significant final paper on a text or texts and topics addressed in the course.

The requirements of the course are straightforward: one in-class examination; one take-home examination; one essay; unannounced quizzes on the reading.

Class attendance is mandatory and is strictly monitored: the first two absences (150 minutes = 1 week) will be excused, but each absence thereafter, unless excused for extraordinary reasons and in writing, reduces the final mark by 10%.

toptop

ENL 3241

The British Romantics

Richard Brantley

The emphasis is on such major poets as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, and Byron. The approach is historical, interdisciplinary, biographical, and formalistic. Directions for both the midterm and the (non-cumulative) final are as follows: “Identify the following fifteen passages, author and title (60 points). Comment on two of them (for a total of 60 points). In commenting, take class discussion into account and go beyond it.” Twenty typed, double-spaced pages of critical response are required, though not all at the same time. The text is David Perkins, ed., English Romantic Writers.

toptop

ENL 3241

Late British Romanticism

Judith W. Page

This course will focus on selected authors from the second generation of British Romantic writers, in this case Sir Walter Scott, John Keats, Lord Byron, Felicia Hemans, Percy Byshee Shelley, Jane Austen, and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. We will consider various questions in literature and culture from (roughly) 1812–1832, including the relationship between literary and popular culture, revolutions in politics and in genres and styles, problems of canon formation, as well as questions of gender and sexuality. In addition to a wide selection of poetry, essays, and letters, we will also read two novels: Austen’s Persuasion and Shelley’s Frankenstein.

Requirements

Writing assignments will probably consist of two papers, a midterm exam, and a comprehensive final exam.

(Students who have taken Early British Romanticism may also take this course.)

toptop

ENL 3251

Nineteenth Century British Literature:
Ideologies of Perception

Julian Wolfreys

This course will explore the ways in which writers of the nineteenth century mediated the English middle-classes’ perceptions of themselves. In doing so, it will examine a variety of genres and modes, including autobiography, children’s literature, poetry, the novel and the short story, detective fiction, polemical and philosophical writing. In examining different forms of writing, the aim of the course will be to unfold the various mediations of subjectivity in relation, or in reaction, to dominant discourses of the self during the Victorian period, as these surface in differing ways across different genres; we will also consider the ways in which the different modes and genres shape the constitution of the self as a social subject interpellated within the parameters of the culture. In the process, we will consider notions of gender, childhood, criminality, as well as questions of faith, belief, and historical evidence, as these serve to question or uphold the cultural, political, and epistemological shaping of nineteenth-century subjectivity.

Texts include

Requirements

Attendance and participation in discussion: 40%
three essays (one on poetry, one on non-fiction prose, one on fiction): 60%

toptop

ENL 4220

Elizabethan Prose Fictions

Jack Perlette

In the realm of Elizabeth I, in the era of Shakespeare and Spenser, in the Golden Age of English lyric, epic, and dramatic poetry, prose fictions formed a large, popular, and important component of the literary production of the time. Highly varied in form and style, these stories and tales also served a variety of ideological functions. The course will concentrate on prose fictions written and/or published during the reign of Elizabeth I (1559–1603). Specifically, we will focus on the interplay between text and society in terms of the textual production and/or subversion of ideologies of gender and of status and class. My goal is to provide a course useful not only to students interested in the Renaissance, but also for those interested more generally in narrative fiction (or the novel) and ideological critique, in feminist/gender approaches, and in the relationship of literature to society.

Texts

The required primary texts are:

.

Reading List

Tentative reading list, in the order of reading:

(Other titles may be substituted for or added to the above; the most likely scenario, however, is that this list will be cut slightly.)

This primary list will be supplemented by a secondary list of brief critical analyses or theoretical discussions (in xerox copy).

Prerequisites

Technically, none, though you should bear in mind that this is an upper division course in which you may be competing with people who have had some experience in thinking about and analyzing literary texts. I do not expect you to know anything about Elizabethan England or its literature, but I will expect you to know how to write a focused, organized, well-developed essay with a minimum of mechanical (i.e., spelling, grammar, punctuation) errors.

toptop

ENL 4221

Milton

R. Allen Shoaf

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the major poems and some of the important prose of Milton in such a way as to help them understand the significance of such a poet’s quest for a “fit audience... though few” (Paradise Lost 7.31).

This is a reading-intensive course. You will read a great deal in this course and be expected to read it very closely, very carefully. Hence the following three categories of requirements apply.

One, there will be numerous quizzes, unannounced except for this notice; these quizzes will assess your progress and pace in the reading (and will be graded with a + for “good”; ok for “adequate”; or ? for “needs improvement”).

There will be three essays, in length 5 pages (minimum) each, the first of which will be on a fixed topic, the other two of which, on topics of your choice. I set no upper limit to the length of these essays; however, I know from experience that fewer than 5 pages will not be adequate. From experience also I know that narrower is better – the narrower the topic, the likelier the success of the essay – and therefore you are urged to clear your topics with me.

The final category of requirement is the most difficult: it is called attention – if you do not pay attention to Milton, to every syllable (and I mean that literally), then you will not understand his writing. I will teach you how to employ your attention and where to focus it; but you must bring your attention to the texts we read together.

Class attendance is mandatory and is strictly monitored: the first two absences (150 minutes = 1 week) will be excused, but each absence thereafter, unless excused for extraordinary reasons and in writing, reduces the final mark by 10%.

toptop

ENL 4273

Twentieth-Century British Literature

Alistair Duckworth

Concentrating on fiction and poetry, we will discuss (in the first half of the course) selected works by Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, Waugh, and Auden. In the second half we will discuss selected works by Spark, Trevor, Kureishi, and Doyle (among writers of fiction) and Larkin, Harrison, Heaney, and Duffy (among poets). Recalling the major (and often terrible) events of the twentieth century – the two World Wars, the Spanish Civil War, the Holocaust, the troubles in India and Ireland, the retreat from Empire, the creation (and recent roll-back) of the Welfare State, the emergence of popular culture, the devolution of power to Scotland and Wales – we will examine the various ways in which writers intervene in their historical moments. The format of the course is lecture and discussion – with discussion warmly encouraged.

Written requirements are reading quizzes, mid-term and final examinations, and two papers of 2000–2500 words.

toptop

ENL 4311

Chaucer

James Paxson

This course will familiarize students with the major narrative poetry of Chaucer. We will devote most of our study to several of the Canterbury Tales and to Chaucer’s great romance, Troilus and Criseyde. We will also examine at least one of Chaucer’s long allegorical poems, The House of Fame, along with Latin and Italian source materials included in our main textbook. Students will learn to read Chaucer’s Middle English (the form of the English language from about 1100-1500 C. E.), and they will be introduced to the principal methodological issues constitutive of contemporary Chaucer studies. That is, they will investigate how Chaucer studies incorporate modern critical theory – especially involving issues of narrative complexity, figurative discourse, and the poetic representation of gender. Particular focus will fall upon the issue of subjectivity, since Chaucer – often seen as the forerunner of modern novelistic art – lays claim to being the first major author in English to cultivate the poetics of the subjective, the personal, and the psychologically realistic. Class meetings will include lectures, discussion, and, especially early in the term, recitation and spot translation of Middle English.

Required texts, which will be available at Goerings Bookstore, will include the Norton Critical Edition of The Canterbury Tales (Kolve and Olson, ed.); the Colleagues Press edition of Troilus and Criseyde (Shoaf, ed.); The Cambridge Chaucer Companion (Boitani and Mann, ed.); and supplementary critical essays which will be made available in xerox, as will The House of Fame.

Major course work includes class participation and regular, unannounced quizzes (20%); translation exam (in late September, 20%); one short paper (5-7 pages) that summarizes and critiques three critical articles or book chapters on a Chaucerian topic (20%); term paper (12-15 pages) due second to last week of fall term (40%)

toptop

ENL 4333

Shakespeare

Ira Clark

Ira Clark’s advanced Shakespeare course will cover 13 or 14 plays. It will open with a pair of plays to help students become accustomed to envisioning performances from a dramatic text and to reading highly rhetorical and poetic texts. We will proceed with a cluster of plays that illustrate Shakespeare’s dramatic and stylistic development; likely these will track the Roman plays or a series of comedies. We will read at least one cluster of histories, one of comedies, and one of tragedies. All along we will concentrate on helpful ways to read Shakespeare’ plays: for examples, as representations of Shakespeare’s era, as means of raising problems about our own era, as ways of considering other eras and cultures. And we will focus on the questions and debates Shakespeare’s plays have stimulated over theological, political, social, psychological, gender, and other issues.

Grades will be based on a combination of 11 pop tests and 500-word reaction papers, dropping the lowest grade (30% of the grade), a 3000-word paper due at the middle of the term (30% of the grade) and a 5000-word paper due at the end of the term (40% of the grade). Both paper topics must be agreed upon in advance by the student and teacher.

toptop

ENL 4333

Shakespeare

Peter L. Rudnytsky

This course is the second in a projected four-part sequence that will read all of Shakespeare’s works along with selected texts by his contemporaries. Each semester may be taken independently, though students are encouraged to register for more than one semester if they so choose. This semester we will take up Shakespeare’s works from approximately 1595 to 1599. These will include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Richard II, King John, The Merchant of Venice, 1 Henry IV, The Merry Wives of Windsor, 2 Henry IV, Much Ado about Nothing, Henry V, and Julius Caesar. We will also read Shakespeare’s Sonnets and Marlowe’s The Jew of Malta and Dr. Faustus, and perhaps some other Elizabethan plays. The requirements are a midterm, final, and one five- to seven-page term paper. Regular attendance and active participation in class discussions are also expected.

toptop

LIN 3680

Modern English Structure

Roger Thompson

This course focuses on the structure of the English language from the standpoint of descriptive rather than prescriptive linguistics. In other words, rather than teach you how you should use grammar, I will help you explore how native speakers actually use English grammar as they interact with each other in a variety of settings. This should be interesting for future English teachers who need to work with students from a variety of backgrounds, whether native or non-native speakers of the language. It should also be useful for those of you who are interested in sociolinguistics.

If you are interested in the undergraduate minor in Teaching English as a Second Language, you can find full details at http://web.lin.ufl.edu/ufminor.html. This is a core course in the program.

Grades

300 points Three Exams
100 points Class Participation (4 points per day – no excused absences)
100 points Four 25 point grammar detective assignments to investigate how grammar is used around you (late assignments, 3 point penalty)
25 BONUS POINTS Be a conversation partner at the English Language Institute, 315 Norman Hall

Exams have three sections. Section 1 asks for definitions or examples of terminology from the readings. Section 2 asks for explanations of grammatical rules from the reading and from class. Section 3 asks for short essays based on topics discussed in class. Class participation points are based on class attendance and participation in classroom activities. At the end of the semester the points are totaled (including the bonus points) and divided by 500. The resulting percentage is converted to a grade according to the following scale: 90-100 is an A, 87–89 B+, 80–86 B, 77–79 C+, 70–76 C, 67–69 D+, 60–66 D. The bonus points do make a difference so I suggest you look into the interaction program at the beginning of the semester.

toptop

LIT 3003

Forms of Narrative

Don Ault

This experimental course will focus on the transformation of plots and characters from one medium to another.

Disney animated cartoon characters:

E. C. Segar’s Popeye comic strip character: which was translated into animated cartoons by the Fleischer brothers and a feature film by Robert Altman

Dashiell Hammett’s Maltese Falcon: which exists in novel form, several movie versions, and a photo-film book

Siegel and Schuster’s Superman and Bob Kane’s and Batman comic book characters: beings who have had numerous incarnations in comic strips, animated cartoons, movie serials, television series, and feature films)

For each class meeting you should read the essays and the visual material (comics) carefully several times in order to be able to discuss them knowledgeably. You will be required to submit take-home writing assignments, which will involve both critical and creative experiments. There will also be frequent short in-class quizzes over the readings. Since I am no longer permitted to put in-class screening segments on reserve, you need to attend screenings and discussions of them in order to do the assignments and pass in-class quizzes. You may also submit an optional final paper to substitute for or augment the specific assignments if there is something of particular interest to you that is (or is not) covered in the course. Your final grade will be based primarily on these exercises, quizzes, and projects. A significant amount of class time will be taken up with screenings, and I expect you to assume considerable responsibility for making this course work for you. Because I plan to conduct the class as much as possible as a discussion rather than a lecture, productive class participation can make a significant difference in your final grade.

Required texts

toptop

LIT 3041

Studies in Drama – Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama

Mel New

We will be reading plays from the period 1660 to 1780, a period known for its bawdy comedies, its hysterical tragedies, and its sentimental melodramas. Some of the more famous plays of the British theater we will read include Way of the World, The Country Wife, Man of Mode, Beggar’s Opera, She Stoops to Conquer, and School for Scandal, all of which continue to be staged in modern times. And we will also read less well-known works, part of our effort to understand this silver age of 120 years in the British theatrical tradition. There will be the usual written work expected in English courses. No films will be shown.

toptop

LIT 3041

Studies in Drama: Citizen Comedy and Domestic Tragedy in the Age of Shakespeare

Robert Thomson

A study of a group of plays unified by being set in the contemporary London and environs of their authors in the late sixteenth century or the opening decades of the seventeenth century. The main focus will be upon the texts and their social, political, historical and cultural contexts. It has been suggested that City Comedy (however we define it) moved to the center of the Elizabethan Stage when Londoners started to reflect upon their new social roles and their urban setting. Social mobility with its attendant pretensions, hypocrisy, greed, pathos etc, arose in the midst of the new middle class society of trade and commerce and gave substance to these plays, as did the threatened state of an increasingly impoverished and newly dependent gentry.

Texts

The plays to be studied will be:

Requirements

Two essays will be set (ca. 2000 words) and in addition there will be a number of in-class tests and oral reports. There will be no final exam.

toptop

LIT 3041

Theories of Comedy & English Comedies

Ira Clark

Ira Clark’s “Theories of Comedy & English Comedies” looks at why we think of certain plays as comic by setting up some of the best-known theories and criticism of comedy to frame discussions and readings of some of the best English comedies from all eras. In turn we will use the comedies to test the helpfulness of the theories. That is, we will be considering the supposed motives and motifs of comedies, the supposed origins and techniques of comedies, some of the subgenres of comedies, and the multiple and sometimes conflicted effects of comedies in order to ask how they entertain us, what they represent, what they tell us, and so on.

We will begin the course with a brief overview of criticism based on a collection of readings. Then we will alternate theoretical and critical frames with the comedies they purport to explain. We will conclude by reading a series of comedies with all of these hypotheses and applications in mind as we attempt to compare and contrast the theories’ helpfulness to understanding how the comedies work. We will cover the equivalent of a major critical piece or a comedy each week of the course.

Grades will be based on a combination of weekly pop tests, 500-word reaction papers, and 750-word take-home essays, dropping the two lowest grades (50% of the grade), and a 5000-word paper on a topic agreed to in advance by the student and teacher that comes due at the end of the term (50% of the grade).

toptop

LIT 3043

Modern Drama

Sid Homan

We study the modern playwrights by “doing them.” Each student has a partner with whom he or she rehearses and performs scenes in class, then reworks the scenes with Mr. Homan as the director. Papers are written assessing the entire experience. No acting experience is required. We will, however, approach the texts in their full theatrical dimension, as something involving dialogue, sub-text, gesture, movement, blocking – all the verbal and physical dimensions of an actual production. We will explore Pinter’s The Lover and Old Times, Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, and Shepard’s Curse of the Starving Class. Students will also attend the series An Evening with the Playwrights (a review of the playwrights Beckett, Shepard, and Shaw) at the Acrosstown Repertory Theatre, and will work with Professor Homan as he prepares for a fall production of the musical Cabaret.

toptop

LIT 3313

American Science Fiction – Fiction Literature and Film

Andrew Gordon

Objectives

  1. To survey American science-fiction literature and film since 1945: the “Golden Age,” the New Wave, the New Women, Cyberpunk, and beyond 2000.
  2. To develop critical skills in thinking about the role of science fiction within contemporary American culture. We will consider science fiction as the literature of science, technology, and change, and as perhaps the most characteristic American literature since 1945, a genre affecting all areas of our popular culture.
  3. To develop analytical skills through writing about science-fiction stories and films.

Texts (at Goerings)

Requirements

  1. Twelve quizzes on the reading.
  2. Two papers.
  3. One oral report to the class.
  4. Class attendance and participation.
  5. Final exam.

toptop

LIT 3374

The Bible as Literature

Richard Brantley

The emphasis is on such major genres of the Hebrew Scriptures as narrative, prophecy, poetry, and wisdom literature. The approach is historical and formalistic. Directions for both the midterm and the (non-cumulative) final are as follows: “Identify the following fifteen passages (60 points). Comment on two them (for a total of 60 points). In commenting, take class discussion into account and go beyond it.” Twenty typed, double-spaced pages of critical response are required, though not all at the same time. The text is the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible.

toptop

LIT 4194

African Literature in English: Fictions of Africa

Apollo Amoko

This course will explore the idea of Africa articulated in the founding fictions of modern African literature. What is the historical, political, social and cultural basis of this idea of Africa? Modern African literature first emerged as a discourse designed to liberate African subjects from colonialism. What ideas regarding African subjectivity on the one hand and the role of literature in political struggle on the other hand did the colonial context impose on African literature? What “Africanized” notions of race, ethnicity, nationality, gender and sexuality did these texts propound? How did these notions relate to each other? In short, we will trace how a politics of identity translated into a theory and practice of art. To what extent is the idea of Africa propounded by the founding fictions representative of the politics of everyday life in the vast and varied continent? Is any literature ever representative of the context that ostensibly produced it? To what extent does the idea of Africa affirmed by African writers depend on, even as it purports to refute, the colonial idea of Africa? In what ways, if any, is African literature different from the literatures of other continents? Does it make sense to classify literature according to the racial, continental, ethnic, national, gender, sexual and other identities of either authors or readers? We will attempt to answer these questions by looking at a range of canonical African novels.

The writers to be studied may include Chiekh Hamidou Kane, Chinua Achebe, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Sembene Ousmane, Camara Laye, Wole Soyinka, Flora Nwapa, Mariama Ba, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Dambudzo Marechera and Tsitsi Dangarembga. We will also study the theoretical and critical texts of such writers as V. Y. Mudimbe, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Christopher Miller, Carol Sicherman, Eileen Julien, Florence Stratton, Juliana Makuchi Nfah Abbenyi, Simon Gikandi, Fredric Jameson and Aijaz Ahmad.

toptop

LIT 4320

An Introduction to Folklore

Robert Thomson

This is in every sense an introductory course; I assume no knowledge on your part of either the materials or the study of folklore though of course many of you will have at least an inkling of what is intended here. By the term “folklore” I mean, firstly, the materials that are subsumed within the many diverse activities of folklore performance including narratives in the form of epics, ballads, folksongs, folktales, legends, myths and folk dramas as well as useages of idiosyncratic verbal play such as riddles, rhymes, proverbs, charms and other verbal utterances associated with superstitious practices and beliefs. All of these forms, by their usage within a folk group, impose a distinctive character upon that group. They may function as both a reflection and constant reinforcement of the manners and mores of a group. However, because it is essentially an unwritten culture, folklore is constantly adaptable to change even though it may, paradoxically, resist alteration.

The term “folklore” also has a second usage; it encompasses the discipline of the study of folklore materials. And so our course will attempt to cover both an introduction to the materials of folklore and also a wide ranging though necessarily brief examination of the many and various methodologies and theoretical approaches which have arisen to explain the origins, nature, forms and meanings of folklore genres.

In the broadest terms, the syllabus may be divided into four (unequal) sections:

A dated schedule of topics is attached and a more specific list of secondary readings as well as a guide to the collection of materials will be made available at the beginning of classes.

Texts

The following texts are required for this course and may be found at Goerings Bookstore at 1717 NW 1st Avenue (books & bagels)

There will be three in-class exams based upon readings and class discussions. In addition you will be required, as your major requirement for this class to complete a collection project and present it, together with an analysis, at the end of the course. The collection project will be broken into two sections; the collected data will be required during the first week of November and the completed assignment, which will involve a detailed “ethnographic” description of the social contexts and an analysis of the cultural function/s of your entire collection will be due on the last day of classes. If time permits, oral presentations of your fieldwork results may also be required. Full details and extended discussions will occur throughout the course in relation to the collections you undertake.

Your final grade will depend largely upon the fieldwork project as you might expect. The components of the course will compute in approximately this fashion; 10% for each test; 25% for presentation of data collected (Nov. 5th.); 40% final project (i.e. classification & analysis of collection) leaving 5% for any other significant contributions I may take into account on a discretionary basis. Attendance at all classes is expected. Absences will affect final grades. In addition, any instructor of a course devoted to oral communication would be remiss if they did not positively acknowledge or in some way, shape, or form reward the oral contributions of class members. My office hours in Turlington Room 4342 will be from 8am to 9am each day of classes. In addition you may make an appointment – phone 392-1060, extension 267 / email: <rthomson@english.ufl.edu>

toptop

LIT 4331

Children’s Literature

James Haskins

The course will examine picture books, board books, counting books, video and audiotapes, as well as a history of each genre, with special emphasis on classism, racism and sexism. Reports on reviewing services and the major awards in children’s literatue will be assigned, as well as class discussion and reports on multi-ethnic literature, with emphasis on African American, Asian, Latino and Native American literature.

READING AND WRITING ASSIGNMENTS

Required Text

Sutherland, Zena, ed. Children and Books, 9th edition

Assigned Supplementary Readings (See Assigned Reports below)

Requirements

Reports on important illustrators not included in the text: the students assigned these topics should present a short biography of the illustrator and bring a copy of the assigned books to class:

  1. One report on John Steptoe’s Stevie and Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters
  2. One report on Ezra Jack Keats’ A Snowy Day
  3. Two reports on Leo and Diane Dillon:
    1. Biographies and overview of their literary partnership
    2. Examples of their works, with particular attention to Aida.

Reports on Creationist Tales and Myths

  1. Two reports on Russian folklore:
    1. Russian tales
    2. Armenian tales
  2. Two reports on Russian myths:
    1. Russian myths
    2. Armenian myths
  3. Two reports on Chinese tales and myths
  4. Two reports on Indian tales and myths
  5. Two reports on Mexican tales and myths
  6. Two reports on Caribbean tales and myths

Research Paper

One research paper of 10–15 typed,, double-spaced pages (topics to be cleared with me before beginning work), due in the English Department office no later than 4:00pm, Friday of “dead week.” Any of the acknowledged, official styles may be used, i.e., MLA, APA, so long as you are consistent in your use of it. A box with my name and course number will be available there. Do not put papers on/under my office door.

Note: Attach a 3½ x 5½ index card with the following information to your research paper: Name, Social Security number, course title and course number, and the title/subject of your oral report (if given).

Grading

Your grade for this course will be calculated as follows:

Research Paper and/or Final Exam: 65%
Oral reports: 25%
Classroom participation and attendance: 10%

Office Hours

Wednesdays 10:30–1:00 or by appointment before/after class on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Contact Info

Office location: Turlington, 4326
Office phone: 392-6650 ext. 256
Home phone: 378-4661 (Calls will be accepted on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 4:00 PM–7:00 PM, and not at other times)
E-mail: jhaskins@english.ufl.edu

toptop

LIT 4332

Literature For Young Children

John Cech

This course is meant to be an introduction to and an exploration of the child’s earliest experiences with literature, from birth until his/her first years in school. We will be interested in the relationships between children’s books and oral literature and the imaginative, aesthetic, moral, and psychological growth of their young audiences. The course is designed to involve you actively, analytically, and creatively in the study of this subject. You will be encouraged to develop a first hand sense of how some forms of children’s literature are created; you will be asked to look at works for children critically and within their historical contexts; and you will be urged to do your own field work, testing assertions, questions, and ideas that are raised in the course. Literature for Young Children is intended for the children in your classrooms, the children in your home, and the child who still lives somewhere within you.

Readings

Course readings will involve reading 150 picture books, criticism, and other texts that will be assigned during the semester. The picture books will be available at university and local public libraries.

Assignments

toptop

LIT 4333

Literature for the Adolescent

Kenneth Kidd

Adolescent literature did not appear for the first time in the 1960s, with the advent of authors like Judy Blume and Louise Fitzhugh who tackled divorce, sexuality, and generic teen angst. The term “adolescence” descends from Latin, and the earliest entries in the Oxford English Dictionary date from the fourteenth century. Shakespeare describes the “seven ages” of mankind; picaresque heroes and heroines like Gil Blas and Moll Flanders struggle to survive the vicissitudes of youth and poverty. As the nineteenth century unfolded, however, new genres dramatized the transition from childhood into adolescence, and glorifies adolescence as a distinct and crucial period of development. By the end of the century, many “adult” novelists were devoting their attention to (if not quite writing for) adolescents; representative titles include Dostoevski’s The Adolescent (1874) and Henry James’ What Maisie Knew (1897). Such texts emerged alongside clinical-pedagogical literature about adolescence-e.g. Granville Stanley Hall’s two volume Adolescence: Its Psychology and Its Relations to Physiology, Anthropology, Sociology, Sex, Crime, Religion, and Education (1904). Literature by adolescents also began to appear by the century’s end; the first adolescent diary written for publication was apparently Marie Bashkirtseff’s Journal (1887). With this history in mind, this course examines literature for, by, and about adolescents from the late nineteenth century to the present. We’ll concentrate on young adult literature from the 1960s to the 1990s, but we will read and discuss it in light of these earlier narrative traditions. We’ll be particularly concerned with the twentieth century’s reinvention of the nineteenth century adolescent. The modern teen is of course intimately connected to material culture; being a teenager means watching tv, driving cars, and buying lots of cool stuff. It also means being a social “problem,” and many of our selections are problem novels in the “new realism” mode. The course will be conducted as a seminar and participation is required.

Texts (Check with me before you buy books)

Requirements

Your grade will be determined by your writing and participation, and of course I’ll work closely with you.

toptop

LIT 4333

Literature for Adolescents

James Haskins

The course will examine literature appropriate for adolescent and young adult audiences, with special emphasis on the sociopolitical and psychological interpretations of the various genres. Genres to be explored will include nonfiction, historical and modern fiction, and literature for the young-adult audience dealing with contemporary themes of interest, as well as the problem novel. Issues such as censorship, religious themes, intercultural and interracial dating, abortion, and substance abuse will be discussed. Group discussions will be emphasized, and individuals as well as groups of students will be assigned reports and asked to lead class discussions on authors and book topics.

READING AND WRITING ASSIGNMENTS

Required Text

Kenneth L. Donelson and Alleen Pace Nilsen, Literature for Today’s Young Adults, 6th edition

Required Supplementary Readings

Assignments

Research Paper

One research paper of 10–15 typed, double-spaced pages (topics to be cleared with me before beginning work), due in the English Department office no later than 4:00pm, Friday of “dead week.” Any of the acknowledged, official styles may be used, i.e., MLA, APA, so long as you are consistent in your use of it. A box with my name and course number will be available there. Do not put papers on/under my office door.

Note: Attach a 3½ x 5½ index card with the following information to your research paper: Name, Social Security number, course title and course number, and the title/subject of your oral report (if given).

Grading

Your grade for this course will be calculated as follows:

Research Paper and/or Final Exam: 65%
Oral reports: 25%
Classroom participation and attendance: 10%

Office Hours

Wednesdays 10:30–1:00 or by appointment before/after class on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Contact Info

Office location: Turlington, 4326
Office phone: 392-6650 ext. 256
Home phone: 378-4661 (Calls will be accepted on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM, and not at other times)
E-mail: jhaskins@english.ufl.edu

toptop

LIT 4554

Critical Theories for Feminist Thinking

Stephanie Smith

What is feminism? What does it mean to think as a feminist? How is this critical posture still of political use, especially in this era of the “post” – post-modern, post-colonial, post-feminist? What kind of “theory” is feminist? Why? Why does feminism use theory? This course is designed first and foremost as a general introduction to the variety of analytic, theoretical and interpretative approaches that have generated feminist thinking and debate over the last twenty years.

The primary focus of the class will be how the critical thinking that gave rise to feminism as a public debate has changed and continues to reshape traditional approaches within other forms of study, such as literature, philosophy, anthropology, political science, film, and video.

Students will be asked to do the following:

  1. write response papers
  2. participate in discussion
  3. take a mid-term
  4. take a final exam

Required Reading

Other readings (hand-outs) will be provided by the instructor.

toptop

LIT 4930

Literature and the Law

Haskins and Little

This course/seminar will explore the relationship between Literature and British Common Law and American Jurisprudence. It will also examine the writings of St. Thomas Aquinas and other religious thinkers and theologians i.e. Paul Tillich, Martin Buber and others. The course/seminar will address various Supreme Court decisions i.e. Roe v. Wade and Dred Scott v. Sandford and their groundings in religious law. Discussions will also include the relationship between The Bill of Rights and The Ten Commandments, The Torah, and The Koran. Seeking to place in context the decisions, acclamations, determinations, and legislation of laws based in or on religious and philosophical premises. This course/seminar seeks to examine ancient texts from Hammurabi Codes to the Black Codes and will attempt to examine fiats, edicts, and executive privilege. All toward an attempt to explain the relationship between how laws are developed and enacted; based on certain ethical and moral values, no matter the society.

In attempting to cover such a wide range and various periods in history, distinguished members of legal, religious, and philosophical communities will be invited as guest speakers with expertise in the specific areas to be covered in the seminar. This will include a Hebrew scholar of the Talmud to lead discussions on the laws of the Torah and its relationship to American jurisprudence, as well as a Rabbi, a Catholic legal scholar, a Priest, a Muslim scholar to discuss the Koran, a Hindu scholar, an Imam, etc. As well, The Constitution of the United States and perhaps the United Nations Charter and related documents will be discussed.

This seminar/course could be a three-hour, once a week seminar at night or on the weekend with credits to be determined by the college. This course may be offered for one semester and is recommended for second and third year law students, and upper division and graduate English majors, and could be financed by both the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Law School, with additional funding sources sought from private foundations and interested professional organizations.

Literature and the Law Reading List

Religious Texts

Books

Documents

Supreme Court Rulings

Other Readings

Additional Reading/Handouts may be provided by guest lecturers.

toptop

LIT 4930

English Comic Drama

Mel New

We will be reading comedies from Shakespeare to George Bernard Shaw and Oscar Wilde, with a stopover in Restoration and late l8th century comedy as well. Emphasis will be on the formal characteristics of dramatic wit, comedy, irony, and farce, and the meaningfulness of the comic vision of life as portrayed in the British theater for some 300 years. There will be the usual written work expected in English courses. This is a course for students who like to read, since we will cover approximately 15–20 plays. No films will be shown.

toptop

LIT 4930

The Newbery Medal Books

Kenneth Kidd

On June 21, 1921, publisher Frederic G. Melcher proposed to the American Library Association that a medal be given for the most distinguished children’s book of the year, suggesting that it be named in honor of the eighteenth-century bookseller, John Newbery. Since 1922, the Newbery Medal has been awarded annually to books of assorted themes, genres, narrative complexities, and ideological orientations. The first such award in the world, the Medal has had a profound impact on the field of children’s literature, on K-12 education, and on children’s publishing. The winners constitute a canon of modern-day children’s classics; they stay in print for decades and influence as well as document our social values and national priorities. For instance, in the 1920s and 1930s, eight of the first eighteen Medal books addressed foreign cultures or indigenous groups in the Americas. In the 1940s, the winning books were often patriotic in theme. Utopian/dystopian fantasy and science fiction became more popular after the 1950s, and since the late 1960s, family drama and dysfunction have taken center stage.

Weirdly, there has been almost no research on the Newbery canon and its significance, and that larger issue will be our primary concern. We’ll also explore the role of the Newbery books in the K-12 curriculum, since many are taught or recommended in school. We’ll collectively read all of the these “instant classics,” which range in genre from poetry to biography to various forms of fiction. To understand their appeal and import, we’ll draw from critical studies such as Pierre Bourdieu’s Distinction, John Guillory’s Cultural Capital, and Janice Radway’s A Feeling for Books (a magisterial study of the Book-of-the-Month Club). The Newbery books emerged out of the early twentieth-century heyday of children’s book publishing, selling, and reviewing. We’ll thus address the tension between newer, mass-market methods of book distribution and a more genteel and singular sense of literature. Fundamental to the course are questions of canonicity and taste, in and around modernity and the larger history of children’s culture.

Texts and Requirements

We’ll read at least one text a week, sometimes more. Specific texts TBA. A complete (and chronological) list of the Newbery Medal Winners and Honor Books can be found at the following website of the American Library Association: http://ala.org/alsc/new bpast.html.

Students will write short response papers and several essays, and participate in a group project addressing a decade’s worth of Medal books. There will be no exams. Attendance and active participation are required.

toptop

LIT 4930

Cultures of Childhood

John Cech

This course will examine that wide range of materials (including literary texts, media, folklore, film, art, music, holidays, physical spaces, toys, furniture and other objects) that form what we generally call “children’s culture.” As part of the analyses of these specific materials, the course will be especially concerned with the contexts – social, economic, historical, psychological, mythic – in which these cultures (and these materials) occur and evolve. The purpose of the course will be to explore the dynamic, complex nature of children’s cultures from American and international perspectives and to investigate some of the ways that those cultures that are produced by and for children reflect as well as affect the adult societies that have created them.

Readings

Will involve a spectrum of “texts” – from children’s books to scholarly studies, from popular magazines to television advertisements.

Assignments

toptop

LIT 4930

Eccentric Spaces and Spatialities

Terry Harpold

Flectere si nequeo superos, Aceronta movebo – Virgil, The Aeneid

We shall pick up an existence by its frogs – Charles Fort, Lo!

Angered by Aeneas’s impertinent foray into the underworld and by Jove’s disinterest in punishing him, the goddess Juno summons furies to wreak her revenge upon the errant Trojan: “If I can sway no heavenly hearts, I’ll rouse the world below.” Her threat has become a classic reminder of the unhappy consequences of crossing forbidding boundaries. Sigmund Freud’s choice of Virgil’s line as the motto of his masterpiece The Interpretation of Dreams is an acknowledgment of the seductive force of the spatial taboo: the other scene, the space over there, irresistibly draws our eye and mind towards it; but our journey over the threshold is perilous.

Charles Fort, the twentieth century’s greatest chronicler of occult phenomena, suggests that the spirit of an age is best understood by looking to the rubbish that spills from its edges. To match the well-behaved domains of modern physics and geography, he wrly proposed a contrarian region he called the “Super-Sargasso Sea,” located somewhere above the Earth’s upper atmosphere. From there tumble falls of fish, frogs, periwinkles, insects, blood, colored dusts, ice, stones, bricks, and myriad edible stuffs – flotsam and jetsam well-documented in the popular and scientific record that appears to defy “reasonable” explanations. Within those superabundant terrains Fort also located the waystations of fairy lights and improbable airships, the shadowy towers of the Fata Morgana, and the battlefields of angelic armies.

To ask if Fort “really” meant to claim that the heavens are chock-full of angels, frogs, and other junk is to miss a broader significance of eyewitness testimony that the sky is falling. Looking up or down, to the center or the periphery, the other scene insists on being attended to. Reasonable imaginaries of space are bounded, are supported, by more fractious and unreasonable forms. These we commonly treat as fables, mirages, or the products of madness or artistic perverseness. The more interesting problem, as Freud and Fort understood, is not why eccentric spaces appear undisciplined, mischievous or nugatory; but how it is that “normal” spaces do not.

This course is an eclectic survey of spatial imaginaries in modern fiction and criticism. (Though our discussions will touch on the conceptual genealogy of “cyberspace,” we will not address that vexed spatial tradition directly.) Literary readings for the course will include a brief foray into classical and medieval descriptions of the descensus ad inferos (descent into the underworld) – Homer, Virgil, and Dante – and essays, novels, novellas, and short stories by nineteenth- and twentieth-century authors J.G. Ballard, Jorge Luis Borges, Philip K. Dick, Georges Perec, Edgar Allan Poe, Marilynne Robinson and Jules Verne. Theoretical and historical readings will include texts by Joseph Amato, Gaston Bachelard, Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, and Dominique Laporte; and by authors writing on occult and “unexplained” spatial experiences and traditions, including Charles Fort and Walter Kafton-Minkel.

Course requirements include a take-home midterm exam and a research paper.

toptop

LIT 4930

Heroes in Transformation

(Cross-listed with LIN 4127)

Marie Nelson

LIT 4930: Heroes in Transformation (also offered as LIN 4127: Old English), begins with a novel that focuses on a monster in transformation – John Gardner’s Grendel. We will be reading this text not just to see how Gardner’s hero re-tells the stories of all three great battles (when he was killed in the first one), but also to see how Gardner recaptures some of the stylistic features of his source, the Old English Beowulf. Grendel, then, will provide an entry to the language and the world of the Old English poem. Following this introduction, we will read selections from J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, Michael Crichton’s Eaters of the Dead, and other Beowulf translations, all of which will lead back to the language of the Beowulf poet.

Required texts will include Gardner’s Grendel, Quirk and Wrenn’s Old English Grammar (which will provide the basic information we need to see how character-defining compounds are formed and provide answers to other questions concerning Old and Modern English usage), Seamus Heaney’s translation of Beowulf (a remarkable transformation presented with facing Old English text), and a set of Readings for Old English that will provide further opportunity to read about other heroes in transformation, including two accounts of heroes who chose not to fight.

A number of exercises are included in Readings, from which three short papers are to be developed. There will be no quizzes and no exams.

toptop

SPC 3605

Speechwriting

Ron Carpenter

Speechwriting is an advanced composition course. In SPC 3605, students acquire stylistic prowess by which their sentences have increased potential for memorability and quotability, ease and accuracy of comprehension, as well as overall persuasiveness. The course is called Speechwriting because models of eloquence to be imitated are in sentences of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, John Kennedy, and Martin Luther King, Jr., for examples. Although you practice these stylistic skills while writing speeches, the acquired prowess is applicable in virtually any future communication endeavors, as speakers or writers, regardless of profession.

SPC 3605 is not about supporting arguments or organizing them into broader discourse. If you seek those skills, other courses are more appropriate. Speechwriting is about how to select the best words and arrange them in their best orders – within sentences – to achieve optimal impress of your ideas upon readers or listeners. These stylistic skills are practiced and perfected in drafts that you aloud among peers (and for me) during our “lab” periods, wherein you should acquire a refined sense of how to achieve the final product desired at the semester end. Thus, present drafts when due; listen carefully to other students’ drafts, comparing yours with theirs; participate in rewriting others’ sentences; and heed my commentary about all drafts. Do not assume that “participation” means simply presenting your drafts and listening only to commentary about them.

How a draft is presented, vocally and physically, has no bearing on your grade (for help with delivery skills other courses are appropriate; I may make suggestions about how to improve your platform presence, however). The important point is that Speechwriting is an advanced composition course, wherein you read drafts aloud as bases of discussion by which all students understand how and why some sentences are better than others. For initial and final drafts, I require word processing available in computer labs on campus (if you do not have your own computer). Revision on your disk is easier; spelling is accurate; and word lengths of drafts are known.

From past experience, I know that reasonably diligent students achieve a substantial measure of the stylistic skills taught in this course. Final grades are higher, however, as you (1) demonstrate refined prowess as the competent stylist on exams and in final drafts, (2) understand course precepts derived from readings and lecture materials, as tested by three exams during the semester (the course has no final exam), and (3) produce a final research paper about style as defined in this course (research paper options will be explained during a lecture relatively early in the semester and will require additional library reading). Final grades are determined one-half by the average of your three exam scores and one-half by the quality of your final notebook with polished drafts of speeches and the research paper – all typed, double-spaced, and turned in during exam week at the time and date listed in the University Timetable as the course final exam period. The textbook for the course is Ronald H. Carpenter, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works; it can be purchased at Goerings Book Store at Bageland.

Although this is a writing course, I also am impressed – for grading purposes – by how much you know about style as defined in this class. Please appreciate the fact that this composition course is unlike virtually all other persuasive writing courses at the University of Florida, for the expertise and confidence in the precepts being taught are derived from your instructor’s own published research in four scholarly press books, several book chapters, and numerous research journal articles (all of which infor med my writing of your textbook). Furthermore, from my experience as a communications consultant for organizations outside the university (such as corporate executives, lawyers, civic leaders, hospital administrators, public relations professionals, and officers attending the U.S. Naval War College), I know that skills taught in this course are useful in the “real” world.

In conclusion, teaching you to be eloquent stylists gives me great personal satisfaction. For I can make positive changes in your behaviors as communicators. If you join me in this endeavor, which admittedly entails some substantial effort on your part, I promise you will acquire valuable skills that will be admired by others as well as be useful for the rest of your life, no matter what your later profession might be. The only prerequisite for the course is that you can write grammatical sentences that are punctuated correctly.

toptop

SPC 4680

Rhetorical Criticism

Ron Carpenter

During the Fall Semester, 2002, Rhetorical Criticism has as its focus several “masterpieces of rhetoric.” Although several of these are in the realm of political and presidential discourse, another focus this semester will be upon rhetorical efforts to persuade Americans to engage in armed conflict with other nations. Thus, students will examine how some speakers, writers, and film makers appealed successfully to specific attitudes and actions with profound influence upon the course of events. The primary goal of the course is to provide students with a refined sense of those rhetorical principles and techniques by which their own future discourse is more effective persuasively.

At the outset, please understand that “rhetoric” is not a pejorative word. In its current and inaccurate usage, the word often is prefaced with the adjective “empty” to disparage what “other” people say or write ostensibly as groundless emotional appeal in contradistinction to discourse that presumably only “tells it like it is.” But accurately, “rhetoric” refers to those means by which discourse “adjusts ideas to people and people to ideas.” So rhetoric is the art of persuasion, and rhetorical criticism identifies and assesses what was done with words (and other factors) to achieve persuasion.

Students will write five short papers (3–4 typed pages) that summarize and expand briefly upon assigned readings, films, or group projects (one of these must be the enthymemic persuasion of me). A longer final paper (8–10 typed pages) will report library research about some topic suggested by the course (the focus of that paper must be developed in consultation with your instructor). The course will have a “take home” final exam. Please understand that your group projects will require meetings with your student peers outside of the regular class periods. Students also are required to view some films outside of class. The textbook is Halford Ryan, Contemporary American Public Discourse: A Collection of Speeches and Critical Essays. It is available at Goerings Book Store, next to Bageland.

toptop