Undergraduate Courses, Fall 2002

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Lower Division (1000–2000) Special Content Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

AML 2410

I the People: American Individualism and Universalism in Literature and Culture

Emily Garcia

This course will engage with the dual problematic of characterization (i.e., characters in novels, the moral character, national characteristics) and subjectivization (i.e., the colonial subject, the democratic citizen, the nation-state) as it has served to produce as well as critique constitutions of “America” from the contact period to the present. It will also examine the universal appeal (and appeal for universalization) which such constructions have assumed. It strives to provide comparative study to the fullest possible degree within the constraints of the semester and in no way proposes to fully cover a given time period or geographic space, but rather to supply students with juxtapositions through which to critically consider what it means to be American.

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AML 2410

Aaron Shaheen

Southern Landscapes and the Ghosts that Haunt Them; or, Southern Landscapes, Southern Myths

The southern landscape serves as the central image for the course. The class will look at how southerners – men and women, blacks and whites – mythologize the landscape and then attempt to live with the myths they have created. The texts we will examine range from antebellum plantation novels to twentieth-century political speeches.

Texts MAY include the following:

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ENC 1145

Writing about Victorian Children’s Literature

Julie Sinn

Our goal in this course is to read traditional texts in a non-traditional way. Pilgrim’s Progress, Alice in Wonderland, and The Secret Garden, along with much of Victorian children’s literature have undergone a process of crystallization into “classics.” We will use the MOO and web spaces in this class as sites to begin recreating and challenging the worlds we encounter in these texts. We will also explore how identity formation/maintenance functions as we move through spaces in the first course unit, as we question the “ownership” of spaces in the second unit, and as we attempt to break the known boundaries of spaces in the third unit.

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ENC 1145

Writing about Sexual Dissidence

Nishant Shahani

It is the agenda of contemporary queer politics to interrogate compulsory heterosexuality and draw attention to the manner in which heteronormativity is deeply embedded in legal institutions, political decisions and cultural domains. To be queer is not a desire to be normal, “like everyone else” – it is the attempt to critique the very construction and constitution of what has come to be defined as “normal.” “Writing about Sexual Dissidence” explores the manner in which contemporary thinkers, writers and creative artists have attempted to forge models of queer liberation. Readings include Sarah Schulman’s “Girls, Visions and Everything,” Eve Sedgwick’s “How to Bring up Your Kids Gay” and Judith Butler’s “Critically Queer.”

Students will analyze arguments that foreground the workings of heteronormativity, identifying the interpretive and rhetorical strategies that make them effective. In sequenced writing assignments, students will then practice these strategies, developing original arguments about the operations of heteronormativity in sites and spaces that exist around them – the classroom, the University, the State and the Nation. The class will look closely at the rhetoric of homophobia, and ways in which one can “queer” this rhetoric through logical argumentation and critical analysis.

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ENC 1145

Writing about the Law in Literature

Bernie O’Donnell

This course will be taught in a computer lab.

This course will stress the importance of persuasive/argumentative writing within the template of the law in literature by considering the guilt or innocence of fictive characters. An effective writer is an effective communicator and is therefore better prepared to succeed in the professional world, especially in the legal milieu. Consequently, this course does not so much stress the earning of a letter grade as it does the empowering of students to write persuasively. Eventually, you will forget the grade you will have earned for this class, but with continual practice, you will not forget the skills you will acquire from this course and will use them on a daily basis. This course aims to assist you in improving your argumentative writing skills in all facets: i.e., recognizing your audience, identifying and developing an appropriate voice, creating a well-structured argument, organizing your thoughts into a coherent and persuasive presentation, and improving basic grammatical and rhetorical skills. Such an endeavor will require you to write and revise numerous papers, interact with peers by critically reading and responding to rough drafts, and maintaining an open mind and positive attitude.

Required Materials:

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ENC 1145

Writing about Personal Patchworks: Piecing Music, Images, and Texts in the Electronic Age

Meg Norcia

Using the metaphor of “patchworking,” we will explore the notion of E Pluribus Unum (“One From Many”) in a variety of media. In constructing personal patchworks such as heraldic crests (composed of your favorite bands, movies, vacations, cars, etc.); concepts of “nation,” ethnicity, and food; and soundtracks (what are the songs that underscore the “movie” of your life and why?), we will rely on the use of web images and texts to make meaning from constrasts. We will also explore the political, social, and historical significances of patchwork quilts and what relevance they may have for our own personal patchworks. No prior WWW or HTML experience is necessary.

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ENC 1145

Writing about Feminism: Women, Popular Culture, and the Second Wave, 1962–1976

Kristen Chancey

This class examines one of the most critical periods in the formation of women’s modern cultural identity: the so-called “second wave” of feminism of the 1960s and early 1970s. A time of great social and political change, innovations in birth control, education, and employment opportunities gave women unprecedented control over their lives and their bodies. For the first time, it became feasible for large numbers of the female population, not just a privileged few, to live independent existences. How did women of the period come to grips with both the privileges and dangers offered by their expanded possibilities? How did such radical transformations affect American society at large? And how were such effects reflected in the popular culture of the period not just literature, but magazines, films, and television as well? Through the analysis of such texts, this course attempts to provide an answer to these and other crucial issues of the time. In thinking, writing, and talking about these issues, students will come to a fuller understanding of a period which still greatly influences our lives today.

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ENC 1145

Writing about the Piecing Together of Meaning:
Material Quilts, Electronic Quilts, and the Monster’s Result

Lisa Hager

In this class, we will study quilts as texts, “reading” the materials of our lives in our construction of web, MOO, and material quilt squares. Quilting will be both subject that we are reading about in various texts by authors such as Alice Walker and Margaret Atwood, and the method that we are attempting to employ in piecing together different elements in the composition of academic essays. In writing papers, students will be encouraged to explore questions of gender, race, art vs. craft, and the sometimes-subversive stitchery that has been carried through from antique quilts to Shelley Jackson’s contemporary hypertext quilting in Patchwork Girl. The NWE lab provides the opportunity to juxtapose two similar types of “piecing” together to make meaning; in pushing on the idea of “patchworking,” students will construct a patch of their own in web and material form, analyzing the processes, strengths, and permanence of both media.

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ENC 1145

Writing about Education

Melinda Cardozo

High School in the United States is often described as a carnival, a drag, or even a nightmare, but this class will suggest that it would be more productive to consider it as a performance. Rhetoric by administrators and politicians about “performance” often suggests that students who do not advance to college just do not try hard enough. But what if the performances that are demanded and taught in the space of United States high schools were considered to be influenced by factors other than personal dedication and hard work? This class will explore how college students might reconsider the high school experience as a way to think about the larger processes of subject formation at work in the U.S.

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ENC 1145

Madhura Bandyopadhya

Course title and description unavailable at this time.

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ENG 2935

Honors: Virginia Woolf

Dr. Mel New

Virginia Woolf (1882–1941) may be considered the greatest woman writer in English in the 20th century. We will read extensively in her canon, beginning with her earliest novels, The Voyage Out and Night and Day, and eventually moving to her most famous works, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, Orlando, and The Waves. We will also read her autobiographical sketch, Moments of Truth, and a healthy number of her literary and social essays.

Virginia Woolf did not want to be read as a “woman author” and certainly not as part of a “woman’s studies” program. Rather, she clearly aspired to a place alongside the best authors who ever wrote in the English language, regardless of gender, and she has earned the rare privilege to be so considered. It is, at any rate, the way in which she will be approached in this course. Students will be expected to read everything they are assigned, and to write with warmth and depth about what they are reading.

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ENG 2935

Honors: Artists Who Work In More Than One Medium

Dr. Sidney Homan

We focus on Shakespare, Samuel Beckett, and Harold Pinter, artists who “cross-over” from one medium to another. At issue is how a particular medium influenced their work: that is, to what degree is “the medium the message.” With Shakespeare we look at his sonnets, Hamlet, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, with a special focus on the ways his poetry and work for the theatre are metadramatic: what does each say about its particular medium? With Samuel Beckett, we read his collection of short stories, More Pricks Than Kicks (his version of Joyce’s The Dubliners), and his major play, Waiting for Godot, as well as some other shorter dramatic pieces. We also examine Pinter’s The Lover (a play written originally for television and then converted to the stage) and Old Times, which was inspired by a movie, The Odd Man Out, a “source” for the play with a special meaning for Pinter who has also written film scripts. There are several class reports as well as practice doing scene work for each playwright.

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