Undergraduate Courses, Spring 2003

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Upper Division (3000–4000) Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

AML 3031

American Literature I: Contact to 1865

Carl Bredahl

AML 3031 covers 350 years so our syllabus will be highly selective. In the work before 1800, we will concentrate on patterns of thought and approaches to material that are expanded, rejected, or qualified in the writings after 1800 – for example, the poets Anne Bradstreet and Emily Dickinson, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s stance toward the puritans, and the attitudes toward the natural world of Cotton Mather or Mary Rowlandson and those of R. W. Emerson.

Students will write weekly response papers [one page] to the assignments as well as two longer papers [5–7 pages]. There will also be several quizzes and a take-home final exam. The class format is discussion so all students are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the assignments.

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AML 3041

American Literature II: 1865 to Present

Carl Bredahl

In this section of AML 3041 we will be focusing on responses to the new, individual efforts to come to terms with the shocks and opportunities of changing conditions after the Civil War and as the country moved into the twentieth century. We will be particularly concerned with the power and confinement of language in authors like Twain, Chopin, Cather, Hemingway, Stevens, and Silko.

Students will write weekly response papers [one page] to the assignments as well as two longer papers [5–7 pages]. There will also be several quizzes and exams. The class format is discussion so all students are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the assignments.

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AML 3270

African American Literature I

Debra King

Description: African American writers from 1746 to the present have written in all genres, leaving none unchanged by the appropriation. It is a literature that not only intertextualizes elements of the vernacular tradition (spirituals, folktales and the blues) and its own immediate past, but is a regenerative force of conscious construction and literary beauty within the history of American literature. The goal of this introductory survey course is to investigate the transformational power of black imagination and artistic genius. Students will gain an understanding of and appreciation for the creative dexterity and conventions of this literature. The period covered begins with Lucy Terry’s 1746 “Bars Fight” and ends with the Harlem Renaissance. Although chronology is obscured by a focus on genre, readings are arranged so that students can trace the development of various genres and various styles, themes, images, and structures across time and within individual author’s works. In this way, the course emphasizes the creative process, intertextuality, and literary history.

Format: Class sessions include lectures and discussion.

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AML 3271

African-American Literature 2

Milred Hill-Lubin

Office: 4334 TUR
Telephone: 392-6650, ext. 260
E-Mail: mahl@english.ufl.edu
Office Hours: 7th period on Tuesday and Thursday

Purpose: This course surveys the literary development of African American Literature from 1940 to the present. It begins with a review of “The Vernacular Tradition,” moves quickly to “Realism, Naturalism and Modernism” of the Forties and Fifties, includes the Black Arts Movement of the Sixties and early Seventies, and the Literary Renaissance of Black Women Writers.

Texts: The following texts may be purchased at the Campus Bookstore and The African Violet, 424 NW 13th Street, Suite B, Gainesville, FL 32605; Telephone 352-336-2606.

Requirements:

  1. Assignments should be read before class and students are expected to attend class and participate in the class discussion and other activities of the course. Participation will count heavily where grade average is border line.
  2. Two quizzes, January 30 and March 6 over specific readings. Credit: 40 points.
  3. 3–5 page paper on the material in the texts on Hoyt Fuller, “The Black Aesthetic,”; Malcom X, and Maulana Karenga due on February 20, Credit: 20 points.
  4. One critical paper due, 8–10 pages on Beloved and Praisesong, April 23, 2002, Credit: 40 points.

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AML 3284

Faulkner’s Daughters

Dr. Anne Goodwyn Jones

Born in 1897, southern modernist extraordinaire William Faulkner was hardly in a position to father several of the women writers whose work we will read in “Faulkner’s Daughters,” whether literally, as a man, or figuratively, as a precursor. The title of this course is meant instead to suggest a long term cultural and canonical structuring of the relationship between the genders that took place especially but not only in the South, such that “man” was understood as “father” and “woman” as “daughter.” We will place a range of women writers of the first half of the 20th century U. S. South – black and white, radical and conservative, Victorian and modernist – into that single unlikely category, “daughter,” in order to focus not only on their relationship to Faulkner and other men who wrote professionally, but also on their responses to paternalist practices more generally. At the same time, we will at times pair specific Faulkner texts with specific texts by women writers to examine closely, through the lens of gender difference, their forms of participation in stylistic and thematic modernism. Close examinations of the texts will occupy most of our time, and close reading practices are central to those examinations. Short e-mailed responses to the readings will be due before each class. An annotated bibliography is due in the middle of the semester, and a major final project before the last week. Texts will most likely be chosen from the following list. I’d like to hear your preferences, if you have them – send to ajones@ufl.edu.

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AML 4170

American Political Novel

Debra King

Description: The novel is one of the most powerful ways that the average American is exposed to sociopolitical ideology. This influence is reciprocal. Literature has shaped our way of thinking and behaving but our behaviors, social concerns, and political struggles have also shaped it. This course is a survey of the ways in which politics and specific political issues have shaped American fiction from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.

Focus: What qualifies as a “political novel”? Are propagandistic works political novels? What about historical romances, novels of sentiment, utopian, or postmodern and experimental fiction, do they fit into this category? Since the category of “political novel” is not always clearly demarcated, I use the title as a focusing aid. We will address questions of how the texts under survey influence and are influenced by the race, class, and gender politics of their sociohistorical production. We will seek to discover the connection between a novel’s literary “quality” and its efficacy as a political weapon. Finally, we will discuss the blatant or veiled ideologies the novels under survey advocate. What kind of ideological or socio-political legacies do these texts offer and what have we done with these legacies?

Format: Class sessions include lectures, discussions, and group reports.

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AML 4242

Contested Terrain: Contemporary U.S. Literatures

Kim Emery

Course Description: The shifting boundaries of the U.S. literary canon have always demarcated an attractive “ground” on which marginalized literatures might “stake a claim.” Interestingly, the geographic metaphors informing academic debates over the margins and centers, borders and boundaries of “American Literature” evoke an apparently quintessentially “American” concern with mobility, frontiers, place, and prerogative that also runs through diverse U.S. literatures. The poems, short stories, films, and novels assigned in this course all share this preoccupation with contested spaces. The course will emphasize comparative analysis of ideas about community and territory as negotiated in and through post-WWII works of diverse genres, cultural attachments, and political affiliations. Our exploration will be structured by explicit attention to metaphors of movement, place, borders, and transgression. We will discuss different kinds of community affiliation (linguistic, religious, racial, economic, ethnic, gender-based, geographic, sexual, national, philosophical), their overlappings and imbrications, and the implications – metaphorical and practical – of various kinds of transgression. Finally, we will attempt to draw from this analysis of diverse U.S. literatures new ways of thinking about the “contested space” demarcated by the phrase “American Literature” itself.

Readings will include fiction by James Baldwin, Sandra Cisneros, Jack Kerouac, Toni Morrison, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Sarah Schulman; the course will also engage poems, plays, films, and some supplementary criticism and theory.

Requirements: Regular attendance and demonstrated engagement with the course. Frequent brief, informal writing assignments (in and outside of class). Midterm and final exams; One class presentation; Two 5-page papers.

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AML 4242

American Fiction since 1945

Andrew Gordon

Office: 4323 TUR
Office hours: W 5th-7th, or by appointment
Phone: 392-6650 x254
Mailbox: 4301 TUR
E-mail: agordon@ufl.edu
Home page: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/agordon

Readings

Objectives

An introduction to American Fiction since 1945. We will read some of the major authors and look at the techniques and themes of the novels and stories, with particular emphasis on African-American and Jewish-American fiction. We will consider the influence of the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, and other political and historical events on the fiction and also take into account literary movements such as modernism and postmodernism and genres such as realism, naturalism, and metafiction.

Requirements

  1. Attendance and participation = 10%.
  2. Quizzes on the reading = 20%.
  3. Three papers=65%. The first two papers may be analytic or you may attempt a short fiction (parodying or extending one of the novels or stories we read). Revisions are possible on Paper 1 or 2 if the grade is below a B. The third paper is a research paper.
  4. Oral report = 5%.

Note: No midterm or final exam.

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AML 4282

Contemporary U.S. Women of Color

Malini Johar Schueller

Course Description: This course will focus on the intersection of race and sexuality in the critical and creative writings of contemporary women of color: Chicanas, African-Americans, Asian-Americans, and Native-Americans. Taking sexuality to be a discourse which, in the U.S., has been used as a means of controlling various raced “others,” we will examine the ways in which women of color configure discourses of sexuality in their works. In each of the sections, we will focus on a major trope: African-American women’s sexuality and racial history; Asian-American women’s bodies and nationhood; Native-American women’s bodies and the colonization of land; and Chicanas’ bodies and issues of language. The course will also deal with key issues related to the writings of women of color: race, ethnicity, identity politics, postcoloniality, feminist/gender theories. This is an intensive discussion class. I am interested in your critical responses to the readings. Please come to class prepared to ask and answer questions about the readings.

Possible Texts (available at University Book and Supply)

Requirements: weekly responses or unannounced quizzes; two or three 5–6 page papers; attendance.

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AML 4453

American Protest Literature

Pat Schmidt

Where are we going, Walt Whitman?; The doors close in an hour.
Which way does your beard point tonight?
(I touch your book and dream of our odyssey in the supermarket and feel absurd.)
Will we walk all night through solitary streets? The trees add shade to shade, lights out in the houses, we’ll both be lonely.
Will we stroll dreaming of the lost America of love past blue Automobiles in driveways, home to our silent cottage?
Ah, dear father, graybeard, lonely old courage-teacher, what Amer-
ica did you have when Charon quit poling his ferry and you got out on a
smoking bank and stood watching the boat disappear on the black waters of
Lethe?

– From “A Supermarket in California,” Allen Ginsberg, Berkeley, 1955

Vietnam protests, Camelot, the Johnson presidency, the rise of a counter-culture and the return of Richard Nixon – all are signatures of two decades that continue to beguile and frustrate thoughtful scholars and students alike. Remembered best, perhaps, is the disorder that erupted after the election of John Kennedy in 1960 and ended before Ronald Reagan became president in 1980. Intertwined in these decades are dual strands of idealism and cynicism, hope and despair. In a discussion of the sixties, though perhaps no more so than in any other age, the observer’s angle of vision is all. Unlike the equally complex but more homogeneously perceived drama of 1776 – when, in John Adams’s idiom, thirteen clocks amazingly struck as one – the complexities and contradictions of the sixties virtually define the period, existing as they do within a grid of values that has shaped not only the observer’s perceptions but has itself been shaped by the period.

Such observations suggest a strong connection between the nature of social change and the role of the past. If the past is prologue – as I believe it is – what hieroglyphs remain and how are they to be explained? To compress such inquiries into one course is daunting. But by utilizing a variety of readings, lectures, and film footage from 1950–1970, I believe that we can learn a great deal about such phenomena as the Vietnam anti-War Protests, the Civil Rights Movement, feminism, and the counter-culture. In the process, I would like us to come away with a deeper understanding of the ways in which our experiences shape the narrative structures by which we tell ourselves about our world, and the connection of such structures to the creation of meaning, both in fiction and nonfiction.

Several articles, book excerpts, and primary documents will be placed on Reserve. Writing assignments will consist of a 5-7 page essay, a research project prospectus, and a research paper. Viewing history through the lens of literature, and reading literature through the lens of history, creates a dialectic that should enrich our understanding of both, providing insight into the social changes that are still Blowin’ in the Wind.

Texts

Additional readings

Recommended

Films

Assignments

Written assignments include one short essay, a research project prospectus, and a research paper. All papers must be double-spaced with title pages, endnotes or textual notes (MLA or Chicago) and must include complete bibliographies. Late papers earn a drop of one letter grade for each day late.

Short Paper: (5 to 7 pages) 20 points. Due week four of the course. Carefully striving for a balance between liberal and conservative views, select a moment in the decade – the 1962 admission of James Meredith to the University of Mississippi; the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; the July 1967 riots in Newark and Detroit; the 1969 Woodstock Music and Art Fair; Eugene McCarthy’s decision in 1968 to enter the race for president; the anti-war “moratorium” of October 15, 1969; the May 4, 1970 slaying of students on the campus of Kent State. Compare the reporting of this event by Fortune, U.S. News, The National Observer to that of The New Republic, Harper’s, Rolling Stone, Time, Newsweek. Any illusion of mimesis (an accurate copy) of reality will be challenged as you read these articles. Discuss this phenomenon. Attention must be directed to the way that language acts as a vehicle for mediating between external reality and cultural expectations. From what set of assumptions (about order, hierarchy, military might, etc.) did the writers, whose work you consulted, most likely begin? How are they reflected in his/her structure of ideas, examples, metaphors, evidence?

Research Project: (15 to 20 pages) 50 points. Due two weeks before the end of the semester. This project is an extension of the one above. The topic must receive the approval of the instructor and should again draw on primary sources. A one-page prospectus that outlines the topic, explains the approach being used and the questions considered, as well as a discussion of relevant information about sources, will be required by week eight. In this paper, you are being asked to look for what Alfred North Whitehead called “the curves of history.” Utilizing the concepts discussed above, your focus will shift to the larger canvas of which the above events are a part. Topics may range from contemporary reportage of: the consumerism of the fifties, the growth of the counter-culture, the role of the beats, and the push for sexual freedom, to an assessment of literary tastes, reportage of the 1968 presidential (Republican or Democratic) race, campus protest, the environmental or gay or women’s movement, etc. Your assignment is to explore “the idea of the variable ...and rate of change” during a particular time in the twentieth century and articulate the ways in which representations of such changes became “partial truths.” During the last two weeks of the class, you will be asked to discuss your process of discovery and the specific insights gleaned from your research with the class.

Plagiarism, the undocumented use of someone else’s work, will not be tolerated and will result in a flunking grade. If you do not know how or when to cite a source, see me.

Quizzes, homework, etc. 15 points

Class participation: 15 points

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AML 4685

Introduction to Asian-American Studies

Malini Johar Schueller

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the central critical debates in Asian American studies as well as to major cultural and literary texts. Accordingly, the readings span a temporal range of Asian-American cultural production as well as the debates generated by the institutionalization of Asian-American studies to the present moment. The course includes writings by Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, and Filipino Americans, as well as Amerasians, but the point is not simply to emphasize the cultural and national multiplicity of Asian-American writing. Rather, the readings are organized according to major questions that recur in Asian-American writing across different national boundaries: the narration of cultural conflict; stereotypes and cultural identity; racial difference; redefining feminism; transnational identities; and racializing labor. At the center of the readings is the complex question of what it means to be Asian-American in the U.S.

Possible Texts

Requirements: weekly response papers or unannounced quizzes; two or three 5-6 page papers. Attendance.

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AML 4685

Race and Ethnicity in Twentieth-Century American Literature: Jewish-American Fiction

Andrew Gordon

Office: 4323 TUR
Phone: 392-6650 x254
Office hours: W 5th-7th or by appointment
Mailbox: 4301 TUR
E-mail: agordon@ufl.edu
Home page: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/agordon

(This course is cross-listed with JST 3930)

Objectives

This course traces the development of Jewish-American fiction within the context of twentieth-century American literatures and cultures and deals with the role of ethnic literatures within our multiethnic nation. Though diverse in form and style, most of the works we will read deal with problems of assimilation of Jews into American society and the quest of the protagonists for identity as both Americans and Jews.

We begin with the influence of Eastern-European Yiddish literature (stories in translation) and then read a selection of stories and novels by Jewish-American men and women from the beginning of this century up to the present. We will study how Jewish-American authors contributed to traditions of naturalism, realism, modernism, and postmodernism in twentieth-century American fictions. We will also consider such issues as anti-Semitism, feminism, American responses to the Holocaust, and American attitudes toward Israel. As time permits, we will view some movies based on the fiction.

The course is cross-listed under American Literature and Jewish Studies. You need not be a major in English, Jewish Studies, or Religion to get something out of it. An interest in American studies, in ethnicity and race, in twentieth-century American history, or simply in reading good fiction is sufficient.

I hope this course will make you a more sensitive interpreter of American culture and a better writer.

Texts (at Goering’s Books, 1717 NW 1st Ave, next to Bageland)

At Custom Copies, 309 NW 13 St, across from Krispy Kreme:

Requirements

  1. Attendance and participation = 10%.
  2. Quizzes = 20%.
  3. Three papers. Paper 1= 15%; Paper 2= 20%; Paper 3= 30%. The first two papers may be analytic or take the form of short stories parodying the style or extending the narrative of one of the works we read. Paper 1 or 2 may be revised if the grade is less than B. Paper 3 is a research paper.
  4. Oral report = 5%.

No midterm or final exam.

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AML 4685

Race and Ethnicity in American Literature and Culture: African American Drama

Mark A. Reid

What makes dramas written by Black American playwrights and theater collectives different from those written and or performed by such writers and theater collectives as Arthur Miller, Sam Shepard, Richard Foreman, Laurie Anderson, Judith Malina and Julian Beck’s Living Theatre and Peter Brook’s International Centre of Theater Research?

Using recent theoretical and political debates on the construction of identity, and culling information from recent theater journals as TDR, this seminar traces the historical trajectory of black dramatic writing and performance. Discussion will situate plays, playwrights and such dramatic strategies within a (inter)national(ist) context(s). Thus, the seminar also has as one of its purposes the discussion of the various national and international movements that affect both American and international drama.

The course covers representative works from the Theater of the Black Experience, the Black Arts Movement, The Free Southern Theatre, and the Black avant-garde and experimentalist stage. Readings may include works by such playwrights as Langston Hughes, Lorraine Hansberry, Ed Bullins, Amiri Baraka, Adrienne Kennedy, Ben Caldwell, P.J. Gibson, August Wilson, George C. Wolfe and such performance artists as Fred Holland, Robbie McCauley, John O’Neal, Whoopi Goldberg and Anna Deavere Smith.

In writing their research papers, students must create their own gumbo-like theory of lived and imagined forms of an inclusive and, or, exclusionary constructions of black experience as it has been represented in a particular group of plays or performance artists.

Requirements

  1. Several pop quizzes on assigned readings as well as film(s) screened in the previous class 40%
  2. Moderate two discussions on an assigned reading 20%
  3. Submission of a journal with daily entries 40%

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CRW 3110

Reading and Writing Short Stories

David Leavitt

What is a short story? No genre has so consistently eluded definition. Stories can range from eighty pages (Thomas Mann’s “Death in Venice”) to a single sentence (Amy Hempel’s “Housewife”). The purpose of this seminar will be to explore the parameters of this seductive and evasive form, from the standpoint both of the practitioner and the reader.

The seminar will be built around the idea that writers learn by reading. Therefore you may find the reading load heavier than is typical for a fiction workshop. Each week you will be asked to read a selection of stories by an English or American writer, and to arrive in class prepared to discuss them cogently. This conversation will take up roughly a third of our allotted time; the other two-thirds will be devoted to discussion of your own work (presented according to a pre-arranged schedule) and occasional in-class exercises.

For the first several weeks, I’ll be giving you assignments of a vaguely experimental nature – for instance, to tell a story from the viewpoint of an historical figure of your own choosing (Janis Joplin, Jack the Ripper). You’ll then set to work on stories of your own devising, which may have evolved from these exercises. The requirement of the class, in terms of writing, is that you complete two stories, the first by midterm and the second by term’s end. (The second may be an outgrowth of the first.) It goes without saying that attendance is mandatory, and that failure to show up (along with failure to do the reading) will have an adverse effect on your final grade. Grading will be based on your informed participation in the seminar, the critical acuity you show when judging other students’ writing, and your willingness to work hard: to be the best writer you can be, and to emerge at the end of the semester a better writer than you were at the beginning.

The reading many include stories by John Cheever, William Trevor, Alice Munro, Flannery O’Connor, Grace Paley, Deborah Eisenberg, Allan Gurganus, Amy Hempel and W.G. Sebald.

Final note: although flexibility is essential to any writing workshop, so is structure. The same can be said – and must be said – of the writing process.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To be admitted to upper-division creative writing courses Spring 2003, you must submit an example of your creative writing to the instructor of the course you wish to take. (Instructor mailboxes are in Turlington 4301.) For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, you must submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, you must submit one short story.

Manuscripts must be submitted no later than Monday, noon, October 21, 2002.

Your manuscript must be accompanied by the following:

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration on or about October 27, 2002. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

Padgett Powell

Office TUR 4211-E, phone 392-6650 x236

This workshop course, the penultimate in our series of undergraduate workshops in fiction writing, seeks to help you write better. We also seek to have you read better: to read for form, recognizing strength and weakness in your own and in others’ writing, and recognizing various technical maneuvers in the published work we will read.

Students write three pieces of fiction, delivering a copy to each class member one week prior to group criticism. Students participate in that group criticism with wit and cogency and pertinence. This criticism has one object: to improve the work. Assigned readings, from a book or two by a major writer, will also be discussed. This reading will be looked at usually in a somewhat technical manner; it is understood that in the best of all possible worlds – and we are in it, are we not? – the reading will inspire you in the long trek unto your own vision and craft and your own good writing.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To be admitted to upper-division creative writing courses Spring 2003, you must submit an example of your creative writing to the instructor of the course you wish to take. (Instructor mailboxes are in Turlington 4301.) For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, you must submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, you must submit one short story.

Manuscripts must be submitted no later than Monday, noon, October 21, 2002.

Your manuscript must be accompanied by the following:

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration on or about October 27, 2002. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry (Advanced Poetry Workshop)

William Logan

“Poorly depicted clouds – which most people would not notice as wrong – are so disturbing to Dr. Thornes that they almost spoil visits to museums. For a meteorologist, the distraction is as great as the ordinary viewer being confronted by a figure with three arms. . . . [He added that] too many artists had painted [clouds] as they would a backcloth in a theatre.”
The Guardian (London), 9 August 2000

In this workshop we will attend to words as closely as a painter attends to paint – or to clouds. You will read a broad selection of modern poetry, from Emily Dickinson to Gjertrud Schnackenberg, and write a poem a week. Every week the workshop will consider for discussion poems from the past and poems from students.

This is an advanced workshop in poetry, for students who have already taken the intermediate workshop (CRW 2300) and want to press their understandings of poetic language even further. Early admission is by manuscript. Please submit a manuscript of four poems to the instructor’s mailbox in Turlington 4301 by October 21, 2002.

Required texts

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To be admitted to upper-division creative writing courses Spring 2003, you must submit an example of your creative writing to the instructor of the course you wish to take. (Instructor mailboxes are in Turlington 4301.) For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, you must submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, you must submit one short story.

Manuscripts must be submitted no later than Monday, noon, October 21, 2002.

Your manuscript must be accompanied by the following:

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration on or about October 27, 2002. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry (Advanced Poetry Workshop)

Debora Greger

“The Queen’s Swan Marker wants people who feed the Royal swans a diet of junk food to be prosecuted. David Barber, the official responsible for counting and marking swans which belong to the Queen, says he has already asked the Environment Agency whether it can prosecute people for pollution if they toss sandwiches into the river Thames. . . . He is arranging for signs to be displayed asking people to feed the birds grain, rather than left-over snacks, which he condemns as ‘junk food for swans.’ Mr Barber said: ‘We are not talking about a few sandwiches but about bagloads. The birds don’t actually die from eating bread but they get very thin and scrawny.’”
The Times (London)

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To be admitted to upper-division creative writing courses Spring 2003, you must submit an example of your creative writing to the instructor of the course you wish to take. (Instructor mailboxes are in Turlington 4301.) For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, you must submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, you must submit one short story.

Manuscripts must be submitted no later than Monday, noon, October 21, 2002.

Your manuscript must be accompanied by the following:

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration on or about October 27, 2002. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 4905

Senior Advanced Seminar in Fiction Writing

Jill Ciment

This course is an advanced fiction workshop open to seniors only. Basically, it will be run in the “traditional” workshop fashion with occasional lectures on structure, metaphor, plot, etc. Some writing exercises will be assigned at the beginning, but the primary emphasis is on self generated work. Each student will be expected to write two short stories, as well as complete a final draft of each.

Optimally, students will turn in stories that they have taken as far as they can on their own. The workshop should be a venue to test the waters, to try new things, to present first drafts as well as polished works, but only after the writer has struggled with it to the nth degree. The idea is for students to rigorously challenge themselves. Everyone not presenting work should take their jobs as critics and editors as seriously as they take their own writing.

Required reading

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To be admitted to upper-division creative writing courses Spring 2003, you must submit an example of your creative writing to the instructor of the course you wish to take. (Instructor mailboxes are in Turlington 4301.) For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, you must submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, you must submit one short story.

Manuscripts must be submitted no later than Monday, noon, October 21, 2002.

Your manuscript must be accompanied by the following:

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration on or about October 27, 2002. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 4906

Senior Advanced Seminar in Poetry Writing

Michael Hofmann

This semester we will be reading a new anthology of narrative poems, and Flesh and Blood, for my money the best book by this year’s Pulitzer Prize winner, C. K. Williams. Observation, compression, suggestion, and framing will figure among the aspects of the contemporary poem for study.

Admission to the class will be largely on the basis of manuscripts submitted to me, with perhaps one or two places held open for deserving late entries. I look forward to a lively and stimulating class.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To be admitted to upper-division creative writing courses Spring 2003, you must submit an example of your creative writing to the instructor of the course you wish to take. (Instructor mailboxes are in Turlington 4301.) For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, you must submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, you must submit one short story.

Manuscripts must be submitted no later than Monday, noon, October 21, 2002.

Your manuscript must be accompanied by the following:

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration on or about October 27, 2002. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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ENC 3254

Professional Writing in the Discipline

Instructor Varies

Call 392-5421: Except for 7 sections that are reserved for Education majors, this course is offered out of the Dial Center for Written and Oral Communication.

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ENC 3310

Advanced Expository Writing

Jane Douglas

Course overview: We’ll explore stylistics and literary devices that will enable you to make your prose vivid, evocative, and memorable, while paring unnecessary verbiage to a minimum. You’ll come to wield these techniques with assurance by using them in three expository genres: narrative, description, and analysis. In addition to the three primary writing assignments, you’ll also complete short response papers to the innovative works by prose stylists, all included in your course pack.

Assignments: 3 x 8–12 page papers using narrative, description, and analysis, plus brief 1-2 page response papers analyzing the prose style in each of the course pack readings.

Required reading:

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ENC 3312

Argumentative Writing

Pat Schmidt

One purpose of this course is to develop skills which will enable you to frame arguments which carry real weight and to develop confidence in deciding the strength of arguments made by others. To do so requires us to be able to demonstrate clearly the reasons for our beliefs and cogency of logical inference.

What we are “about” is more than that, however. In the words of Wayne C. Booth and Marshall W. Gregory, the authors of the text we shall use for the course, “we are moral agents attempting to do something in or to the world.” Thus, it is hoped that in addition to skills, this course will nourish the quality of thought which underlies good writing through readings selected for the course and through class discussions.

Robert Maynard Hutchins tells a story which nicely addresses the need for this second loftier goal:

My father came home from India about thirty years ago with the story of a British woman who was plagued to death by the questions of her Indian servant. Finally she said to him, ‘Why don’t you use your common sense?’ He replied, ‘Lady, common sense is the gift of God; I have only a technical education.’

Argumentation is a good deal more than a skill. The rhetorical assumptions which undergird it comprise a habit of mind. The course will be informed by an exploration of those rhetorical assumptions.

Texts

Requirements

Papers must be typed and double spaced with title pages. A bibliography and footnotes (or endnotes) should be used where appropriate. If the paper is late, its grade drops one letter grade for every day late. Staple or clip the pages. No binder or covers, please.

This is a demanding course so be prepared to work.

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ENC 4212

Professional Editing

Wayne Losano

Professional Editing is designed to give English majors in the Writing and Editing Track a taste of the real-world editing and document coordination experience. Experienced practitioners from area organizations and companies will be invited to share their job requirements and activities with the class. Editing activities, including helping with actual editing responsibilities, will be provided. The ‘official’ prerequisite for the course is ENC 3250, Professional Communication, but equivalent coursework or experience may be substituted. Upper-division standing is required.

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ENC 4260

Advanced Professional Communication: Scholarly Writing

Jane Douglas

Course Objectives

If you were to randomly query Florida faculty members, you would discover that a surprising number of them learned how to write publishable research papers and grant applications entirely through sweat, anxiety, and hard work – not under the auspices of any course. You’re somewhat more fortunate; this course covers most things you’ll need to know to write publication-worthy research papers in a variety of disciplines, as well as how to translate your research into readable prose that can be understood by grants foundations and the general public alike. Along the way, you’ll learn the stylistic and organizational strategies for writing clear, efficient, and highly effective sentences, paragraphs, and documents. And you’ll also learn everything from how to formulate a robust hypothesis to how to handle your research discussion when your outcomes haven’t quite panned out as you expected.

Disclaimer and warning

I’ve designed this course to accommodate the needs of students in the Florida University Scholars Program, specifically those who have been pursuing directed research prior to enrolling in the course. While you can benefit from this course without having lab or research experience, you should be prepared to work harder than your more experienced peers, as you’ll need to identify research issues, questions, and appropriate methods as soon as possible during the first weeks of this course.

Assignments

Your primary assignments include a brief (4–5 pp.) research/grant proposal, and a research paper of at least 4000 words (approximately 16 pages).

To help you improve your ability to evaluate your own work in progress, and to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of all the writing you encounter, published and unpublished – you’ll be required to provide extensive critiques of your classmates’ papers and to grade final drafts of the papers assigned to you. Your grade on each paper will reflect the average of your peer grades and the instructor’s grade; you will also receive credit for your evaluations (exceptional; satisfactory; unsatisfactory), which can add or subtract .025 of a letter grade for each set of evaluations to your final grade.

Reading

Recommended but optional

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ENC 4956

Overseas Studies in Studies

Undergraduate Coordinator

Prerequisite: This course must be approved by the Undergraduate Coordinator before the student travels overseas. It may be repeated with a change of topic up to a maximum of 15-credit hours.

This study, which may count towards the English major, involves course work taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

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ENG 3011

The Major Theorists

Richard Brantley

We will focus on the following major moments in the history of criticism: the classic (Plato, Aristotle, Horace); the medieval (Aquinas, Dante); the Renaissance (Sidney, Bacon, Hobbes); the neoclassic (Pope, Johnson); the Romantic (Wordsworth, Schiller, Schelling, and de Stael); the Victorian (Emerson, Arnold); “the hermeneutics of suspicion” (Marx, Nietzsche, Freud); and the twentieth century (selections to be announced).

The text will be Critical Theory Since Plato: Revised Editon, edited by Hazard Adams.

“Identify the following fifteen passages (author and title). Comment on four. Take class discussion into account and go beyond it.” The 6,000-word journal (about 20 pages) is presented in two installments of 3,000 words each.

Journal entries may vary in length. They may range along a continuum, with subjective, creative responses at one end, and objective, expository responses at the other.

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ENG 3063

Advanced Grammar Analysis/Application

Wayne Losano

Advanced Grammar, intended primarily for students planning to be writing teachers or professional editors, is an intensive study of as many aspects of formal traditional grammar as we can cram into one semester. This includes topics as simple as diction, verbs, and sentence patterns and as complex as morphemes, form classes, and rhetorical grammar. Students will be expected to learn essential terminology to enhance their credibility as teachers and editors, to review and share with the class recent relevant publications, and to edit appropriate documents. There is a possibility of a final exam and/or a major research paper, along with assorted in-class exercises.

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ENG 3113

Movies as a Narrative Art: Narrative Film and the DVD Supplement

Professor Maureen Turim

This course will examine narrative theory and form in film, devoting special attention to the way supplemental materials included in recent DVDs address these issues. We will also read film scripts and close analyses of individual films. The history of narrative film and the functions of narrative film in history will be constant concerns, although the course will not be structured chronologically. We will address notions of genre as they specify patterns of narratives and as they relate to myth. We will look at the ways such concepts as voice, order, and action form narrative. We will explore ways of understanding characters in narrative film. We will look at differences in narrative form and conception, looking at on modermism and post-modernism in film.

Readings

Course Requirements

Two papers of 8 pages each, plus class discussion and miscellaneous assignments. Participation in class discussion is essential. Since discussions will critically evaluate readings and films, assigned texts must be read prior to scheduled meetings. Unannounced quizzes may test your degree of preparation at any class.

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ENG 4015

Psychological Approaches to Literature

Peter L. Rudnytsky

The focus of this course will be on the relationship between Freud and Jung, and how it was shaped by Freud’s possible affair with his sister-in-law, Minna Bernays, and by Jung’s romantic involvement with a patient, Sabina Spielrein. We will also consider the role of the Hungarian analyst Ferenczi, who accompanied Freud and Jung on their trip to American in 1909, and was himself involved in a romantic triangle with a mother and a daughter. No previous knowledge about any of these figures is assumed, but students are advised that the course will deal with the history of psychoanalysis. The readings will include: Freud, Five Lectures on Psychoanalysis, Totem and Taboo, and other works; The Freud-Jung Letters; Jung, Symbols of Transformation, Answer to Job, and other works; and Spielrein, A Secret Symmetry. Course requirements will be either a midterm, final, and a short paper or a long research paper. Regular attendance and active participation in class discussions are also expected.

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ENG 4060

History of the English Language

Kevin McCarthy

The objective of the course is to study the origins and development of the English language, from Indo-European times to the present. We will study the syntax, pronunciation, semantics, and morphology of the language as it has evolved to the present.

Requirements:

3 tests and 1 term paper.

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ENG 4110

Animation and Comics

Dr. Donald Ault

Texts

The class will meet two periods each day, three days a week, which should provide a time-format that will work for screening cartoons and slides and discussing them the same day. We may not always meet for the full two periods. The format needs to be kept open-ended throughout the semester.

This experimental course will provide:

Some specific issues to be addressed:

  1. What perceptual processes are involved in reading comic strip and comic book narratives?
  2. What perceptual processes are involved in viewing comics and animation (and “live-action”), especially in different formats (animation in 16mm, video projection, video monitor; comics in original issues, in reprints, in color or in black and white) and conditions of reception (in a theater, at home, in the classroom)?
  3. What are the differences in narrative possibilities and limitations of comics and animated cartoons (and “live-action”), especially in relation to technological innovation (for example, what kinds of possibilities were abandoned with the emergence of synchronized sound and color cartoons?)?
  4. How are narrative possibilities altered when characters are translated from one medium to another?
  5. What happens to narrative and perception when verbal/visual dimensions of texts are reorganized?
  6. What are the ideological, psychological, etc., functions of such perceptual narratives?
  7. What kinds of cultural work do animated cartoons and comics perform especially Disney productions; how does this problem relate to work emanating from other animation studios such as Warners, Fleischers, MGM, Van Beuren, Iwerks, etc.?

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ENG 4110

Documentary and Propaganda Film: Visual Rhetorics of Desciptions and Persuasion

Dr. Scott Nygren

This course will juxtapose many of the classic films that created the concepts of “documentary” and “propaganda” with more recent work and current cultural theory that contest the visual representation of social and historical issues. Films and videos may include Nanook of the North, The Man with the Movie Camera, Song of Ceylon, corporate advertising and MTV, Surname Viet Given Name Nam, The Emperor’s Naked Army Marches On, Trobriand Cricket, Tongues Untied, and Ellis Island. Books may include Herbert Schiller’s Information Inequality, Trinh T. Minh-Ha’s Woman, Native, Other and Michael Renov’s Theorizing Documentary.

It seems impossible now to grasp one of the central underlying preoccupations of the 20th century, on which “documentary” was founded and had its effects: the supposed bond with reality so long attributed to the camera image. Through such incidents as the scandal surrounding the digitally altered image of O.J. Simpson on the cover of Time magazine, public opinion seems finally to have acknowledged what artists and activists have long known - that the camera is no guarantee of the truth of what is seen. Film’s illusory “realism” appears in retrospect to have been constructed through the historical combination of camera imagery and mass production, and the centralization of the economy restricting channels of communication to the few.

Since digital photography has now erased any fantasy of necessary realism attached to use of the camera, and the relative decentralizations of personal video and the internet have equally erased the concentration and control of communication among a narrow elite, conditions have drastically changed and rethinking is necessary. Is documentary possible? Is everything propaganda? Yet much of what passes for documentary theory still seems a delayed reaction to past conditions, rather than an active working through of present possibilities.

Political and avant-garde practices have already reconstituted film and video as alternative constructive strategies, instead of the positive identification with “realism” that previously prevailed. The camera image has become a kind of text, like the body or the alphabet, which can be characterized by its specific point of entry into the materiality of culture, history and the environment.

Documentary and propaganda might now be reconsidered as visual rhetorics of description and persuasion that embody competing configurations of knowledge and power. The legitimation of media texts derives not from the guaranteed truth of camera images, but from discursive contexts. Originally drawn from anthropology, sociology and political theory, these discourses are increasingly inflected by cultural theorization of the narratives which shape science and philosophy in a Western context.

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ENG 4133

Postmodern/Mass Media

Roger Beebe

“Postmodernsim is not something we can settle once and for all and then use with a clear conscience. The concept, if there is one, has to come at the end, not at the beginning, of our discussions of it.” – Fredric Jameson

This course takes seriously Jameson’s injunction above and seeks, through the 15 weeks of discussion, to cast some light on the concept of postmodernism. Specifically, the course will explore the interrelations between postmodernism and the mass media – primarily film, but also television, radio, and the internet. We will do this both by looking back at the various facets of modernism against wich postmodernism (in its various forms) defines its difference and by looking directly at postmodern films, tv shows, music, etc. In so doing, we will (hopefully) not just arrive at an understanding of how we got into our current historical predicament, but will also start to see our way out of it.

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ENG 4135

French Film

Dr. Sylvie Blum

392-2016, ext. 248
sylblum@grove.ufl.edu

The class will cover the last 20 years of French National cinema and its place in a European context. Readings, lectures and discussions will focus on the place of France in cinema worldwide, as well as the status of popular French cinema. It will cover the following topics: gender and sexuality in 80s cinema, representation of the past, “accented” cinema, nostalgia, space, community, family, etc. Screenings by the following filmmakers: Bertrand Blier, Robert Guediguian, Tony Gatlif, Luc Besson, the Dardenne brothers, Alain Berliner, Cedric Klapisch, Leos Carax, Josiane Balasko, Claire Denis.

(This course is cross-referenced with FRT 3520).

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ENG 4135

Hollywood: The Studio Years

Robert Ray

This course will study “Classical Hollywood,” the years from1930–1945, through a close reading of four films, probably Grand Hotel (1932), The Philadelphia Story (1940), The Maltese Falcon (1941), and Meet Me in St. Louis (1944). If I decide to replace one or two of those movies, I will choose from the following list:

Although the course requires one of the film prerequisites (either ENG 2300, ENG 3115, ENG 3121, or ENG 3122), I will happily accept any junior or senior English majors.

Assignments and Grading

Readings:

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ENG 4135

Japanese Cinema

Dr. Joseph Murphy

No course description available at this time

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ENG 4146

Advanced Film and Video Production

Roger Beebe

This course is designed as an ambitious introduction to film (as opposed to video) production. Work will be exclusively in 16mm. We will explore the process from the most rudimentary ways of putting an image on film (scratching, direct animation, in-camera special effects, etc.) to (relatively) advanced approaches to cinematography, processing, and editing. There will be no synchronous sound production in this course, so all films will be dialogue-free, although we will experiment with ways of adding sound (including double-system sound and video transfer). NO PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE WITH FILM (or video) PRODUCTION IS NECESSARY. What is necessary is a willingness to throw out all of your current ideas about film and to open yourself to experimentation.

Admission is by the consent of the instructor only. Contact him at rogerbb@english.ufl.edu for more details about the application process. Women and students of color should feel especially encouraged to apply. Film is a little expensive, so be warned that there will unfortunately be a considerable materials cost for the class (likely $200–$300).

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ENG 4905

Independent Study

Faculty Member of Choice

An Independent Study course may be taken for 1- to 3-credit hours and will count as credit toward the English major. This course may be repeated with a change of topic up to a maximum of 9 credits.

This course is for advanced students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The student must find a faculty member who is willing to supervise the semester-long study, and together, the two create a project. The student must meet with the professor at designated times, agreed upon in advance, and complete all assignments in a timely manner.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Haunted Hardy: Mnemotechnics, Materiality, Archiving, & Spectrality

Julian Wolfreys

Honors Seminars require an upper-division GPA of 3.5 or above.

While the critical reception of Thomas Hardy has varied throughout the twentieth century, there has been an insistent and recurrent sense that his writing is in some manner flawed. Resisting the hitherto dominant aesthetic-organic approach to Hardy’s writing, we will attempt to examine Hardy’s texts on their own terms, rather than by imposing presupposed ideas of what constitutes the novel, the short story, “good writing”, and so on. Hardy’s fictions and poetry demand that we rethink our positions as readers to the materiality of the text and that we do so, moreover, in the broader context of thinking we have a sense of what fiction or the novel might look like in the last thirty years of the nineteenth century.

This course, will, then, propose a study of Hardy’s writing (novels, short stories and poetry) as an exemplary transitional mode of experimental writing between realism and modernism, placing it in various cultural, historial, philosophical and ideological contexts. At the same time, in order to address other ways of reading Hardy while identifying those aspects of Hardy’s text which disturb aesthetic and formalist critical assessments (and the ideological and epistemological grounds on which such assessments are based), we will also look at recent critical and theoretical approaches to Hardy, as well as the theoretical issues which Hardy’s writing appears to raise, thereby anticipating issues with which much current critical discourse concerns itself. We will also consider the issues addressed through film and TV adaptation of Hardy.

Course Reading

We will attempt to read as much of Hardy as possible. While focussing for the most part on the novels, we will also sample his short stories and poetry, in order to consider how the author handles persistent interests in different ways, within different genres. It is expected that the reading will be as follows.

There will also be a photocopy packet and various handouts throughout the semester.

Course Requirements

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: S. Schulman’s USA

Kim Emery

Honors Seminars require an upper-division GPA of 3.5 or above.

According to Lila, artists were supposed to show that there were other ways of seeing. Putting on a show meant calling people together because you had something to tell them, and that something, thought Lila, should not be the same old thing. (Girls, Visions and Everything, 1986)

Novelist, activist, journalist, and playwright, Sarah Schulman is an American artist who takes her responsibilities seriously. She has spent more than twenty years furiously demonstrating that there are other ways of seeing and other things to see. The context, texture, and constant negotiation of the relationship between those ways and the standard ways, progressive ways and predictable ways, creative ways and conventional ways is the subject of this course.

Do not expect the same old thing.

Although we will read widely – and closely – in Schulman’s own body of work, this is more a focused study in US cultures than a traditional “major authors” course. Our engagement with Schulman’s fiction will be informed by consideration of the mass culture contexts in which it emerges, the counter- and sub-cultural conversations to which it responds, the political movements it engages and advances, and the institutional apparati that condition its appearance and accessibility. From her early work with the Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse, through a decade-long involvement with ACT-UP and the founding of the Lesbian Avengers, to taking on both the right-wing censorship of the NEA and the NEA’s own tradition of elitist, exclusionary funding practices, Schulman has made a life’s work of raising complicated – and necessary – questions. Many of these questions concern the mechanisms and minefields of publishing, of political participation, and of public debate. Schulman has published seven novels and two nonfiction books, many plays, and articles and essays too numerous to count; her works have been translated into at least eight languages and have won numerous awards. Yet, as she wrote in 1993, “I was/am still a novelty act. I was/am not part of the intellectual life of the nation.” At 45 years old, Sarah Schulman has more books already out-of-print than most writers could ever hope to publish in a lifetime. If you’re still wondering whether that’s a recommendation or a warning, this might be a class you’d find interesting.

Requirements: thorough preparation and informed participation, biweekly reaction papers, two class presentations, 10-page seminar paper.

Schulman is scheduled to participate in a UF speakers series this February.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: (Re)Reading New Media Fiction

Terry Harpold

Honors Seminars require an upper-division GPA of 3.5 or above.

“I hop from stone to stone and an electronic river washes out my scent in the intervals. I am a discontinuous trace, a dotted line.” – Shelley Jackson, Patchwork Girl, or A Modern Monster (1995)

We will read closely from a small corpus of classic and recent hypertext fiction and videogames; from selected print works anticipating formal and procedural methods of new media fiction (e.g., works by members of, or influenced by, the Oulipo); and from nonfiction, critical and theoretical discussions relevant to these genres. Our discussions will center on problems of formal constraint, material resistance, and repetition: the operations of re-reading required in order to “complete” a reading of a digital text. The course does not aim to be a survey of new media fiction, but an opening of theoretical and practical investigation of this nascent genre, focusing on a few, representative cases.

Authors whose print and/or digital works we will read include: Walter Abish, Mary-Kim Arnold and Matthew Derby, Roland Barthes, Roger Caillois, Sigmund Freud, Shelley Jackson, Michael Joyce, Harry Mathews, Rand and Robyn Miller, Warren Motte, Raymond Queneau, and Stephanie Strickland. A highlight of the seminar will be a visit by Shelley Jackson, author of Patchwork Girl, one of the most celebrated works of hypertext fiction’s first wave.

Most of the digital texts we will read are not “long” in the sense usually meant when describing printed works of many words and pages, but they are procedurally demanding, requiring multiple passes and variable reading strategies. Think of this course as the equivalent of a seminar on long print novels or epic poetry, and you will have a good sense of the actual reading load.

Course requirements. Each student will co-chair (with one or more students) a meeting of the seminar; a “re-reading log” for one of the assigned digital texts; a 3-page research paper prospectus; a 10–15 page research paper.

Students should have a basic familiarity with the WWW and other interactive digital media, but no prior experience with hypertext fiction or videogames is required. Students must have regular access to a WWW-capable desktop computer system (Windows or Mac OS) outside of the class meeting times. A reasonably-current desktop system (Windows 98 or later, Mac OS 9 or later) should meet computer memory, storage, microprocessor, and videocard requirements of the digital texts required for the course.

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ENG 4940

Internship

Undergraduate Coordinator

Students must have completed at least 12 hours of 3000- to 4000-level English courses.

For students who want to gain experience in an English-related field. Students must find a business that will provide adequate supervision by a delegated authority in an appropriate work area. An initial description of the position from the intern, an outline on of the intern’s duties on the letterhead of the business, a final summary from the intern discussing the merits of the position, and a final evaluation from the business offering the intership. S/U option only. May be taken for 1 to 3 credit hours, depending on the number of hours worked during the week. See undergraduate academic advising in the English department for the guidelines.

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ENG 4953

Department Seminar: F. Scott Fitzgerald: An Instrument of Precision

Stephanie Smith

Department Seminars are for ENGLISH MAJORS ONLY who have completed a minimum of 9 hours of English courses, level 3000-4000.

For many, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald and his wife, Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald are legendary and romantic figures. They epitomize the so-called Jazz Age, which more or less ended abruptly on “Black Tuesday,” October 29, 1929, when the Dow Jones plunged and so, too, did many a man’s fortune – 16 million shares of stock were sold by panicking investors who had lost faith in the American economy. At the height of the Depression in 1933, 25% of the Nation’s total work force, 12,830,000 people, were unemployed. Wage income for workers who were lucky enough to have kept their jobs fell 42.5% between 1929 and 1933. It was the worst economic disaster in American history. People starved.

Fitzgerald’s fiction offers us a picture of the generation whose way and philosophy of life both helped to provoke this political and economic disaster and whose way of life was lost in the wake of it. However, as Brian Way long ago noted, “The evolution of the legend has helped make Fitzgerald a cult figure, but it has harmed his reputation as an artist and made it more difficult to discuss his work sensibly.”

This course is designed to discuss his work sensibly – i.e., critically, intelligently and with passion and in a historical context. Fitzgerald may have attained a cult status, but he was also a dedicated, meticulous and questioning craftsman, a social writer who saw the individual as a condensed expression of the collective social, political, cultural and economic forces that gave rise to that individual’s dreams, desires and despairs.

As a social writer, Scott had the ability of an “instrument of precision,” even as he sought to understand on the page that most imprecise of instruments, the human heart. His narratives function as highly composed word-images that flip into a moving picture of how Americans changed themselves and their social, cultural and political lives in the span of one generation.

Required Booklist

All titles will be available at Wild Iris Books, 802 W. UniversityAve. 375-7477. Supplemental readings will be provided by instructor.

Requirements: a mid-term project and a final research paper

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ENG 4970

Honors Thesis Project

Faculty members (2) of Choice

Students must have have completed at least one semester of ENG 4936, Honors Seminar. Open to English Honors students.

The student must select two faculty members: one to direct the reading, research, and writing of a thesis on a topic of the student’s and director’s chosing, and another as the second reader. An abstract (100 to 200 words) and one copy of the thesis (30 to 50 pages) must be delivered to the CLAS Academic Advising Center on Fletcher Road at least 10 days before graduation.

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ENL 3112

The English Novel: Eighteenth Century

Brian McCrea

We will read eight eighteenth-century British novels. We will study how these novels reflect and speak to changes in British society described by Aphra Behn in her late seventeenth-century prose narratives Oroonoko and The Fair Jilt. Most particularly, we will analyze how social status (which these writers typically use the word “quality” to reference) becomes problematic in these fictions, as economic and social changes create new kinds of wealth and new freedom for women. Whether that “freedom” is substantial or illusory will be a topic we pursue throughout the semester. We also will observe how these novels repeat plots and characters of earlier literature, notably the birth-mystery plot. By the end of the semester, students should have a full sense of the novel as, at once, a product of a specific culture and a long-enduring literary phenomenon.

Students will write two papers (between eight to ten pages each) on topics that I offer. They also will keep a response journal in which they record their reactions to their daily readings. If the class is small enough (under twenty students), that journal will provide the basis for a one-half hour final oral examination. Should the class enroll more than twenty students, a written final examination will be offered.

All papers must be typewritten (or done on a wordprocessor). I am happy to read and comment upon drafts of papers, and encourage students to use e-mail to submit early versions.

Books

(All books will be available at Goering’s Books and Bagels, 1717 N. W. 1st Avenue.)

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ENL 3132

The English Novel: Twentieth Century

Alistair Duckworth

This course will provide selective coverage of significant twentieth-century writers of novels and short stories. We will read and discuss novels by six novelists – Forster, Woolf, Waugh, Naipaul, Lodge, and McEwan – and short stories by (among others) Joyce, Lawrence, Mansfield, Bowen, Trevor, Kuresihi, and Doyle. Two heuristic oppositions will be proposed: that between a neo-Aristotelian and a Barthesian approach; and that between a Foucauldian and a Bakhtinian approach.

Two essays of between 2000 and 2500 words; two in-class exercises; frequent reading quizzes: these will make up the written requirements. Each of the five requirements will count equally in the computation of the final grade. The format is lecture and discussion. There is a strict attendance policy.

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ENL3231

The Age of Johnson

Patricia Craddock

In the history of British literature, the second half of the “long eighteenth century” – roughly 1740–1810 – has been called by several titles, such as the Enlightenment, the Pre-Romantic period, the Georgian age, and the Age of Johnson. Others that might be used include the Age of the Literature of Everyday Life, the Age of Classical Prose, the Age of Revolutions, the Age of Expansion – we might go on and on. Why, then, do we settle on “The Age of Johnson”? Samuel Johnson wrote only one novel, only one play, only a small volume of poems – and some of those were in Latin. How can such a man give his name to an “age”? Essentially, he did so by his intellectual range and influence, especially his extraordinary contributions in a wide variety of nonfictional genres, including the oral genre, conversation, as recorded by his friend and biographer, James Boswell.

Author of the first great English dictionary (and inventor of the idea of a dictionary that traced the usage and change of usage of words by quotations from significant writers), famous throughout the English-speaking world as an essayist, and notable as a great editor and critic, as well as for his original works, he will be represented by several works in this course. But we will also read the works of many of his friends, male and female, and some of his enemies. Whenever Johnson undertook a new form of writing, he tried to think out what that form of writing ought to be – and therefore, he was not only experimental and original in his own works, but encouraged similar responsible innovation in others.

We will see that originality in poems by “canonical” writers such as Goldsmith, Blake, Thomson, Gray, Johnson himself, Cowper and Crabbe, but also in poems by women writers and the Scots “plowboy” Robert Burns. We will also see it in surprising literary forms such as travel books, biographies, letters, diaries and autobiographies, philosophical dialogues, political speeches, and history, considering writers such as Piozzi and d’Arblay, as well as Boswell, Gibbon, Burke, Goldsmith, Johnson, Reynolds, Wollstonecraft, and Hume.

In drama, emerging from the lachrymose period of sentimental “weeping” comedy, we will enjoy two masterpieces that have remained in the standard repertory until this day, Goldsmith’s She Stoops to Conquer and one of Sheridan’s “greatest hits,” either The Rivals or The School for Scandal.

Finally, we will explore at least two short experiments in fiction, probably either Johnson’s Rasselas (comparable to Voltaire’s Candide) or the ancestral Gothic novel, Walpole’s Castle of Otranto, and Edgeworth’s influential Castle Rackrent, which introduced both regional fiction and saga novels and a new kind of unreliable narrator.

Obviously the outline above includes more than we can do in one semester, but even so, it does not do justice to the riches available to the student of “The Age of Johnson.” Remarkably, it is also the first great period in the history of the English novel, but the major novels are lengthy and the subject of another course. Even without the major works of Fielding, Richardson, Sterne, Austen, and d’Arblay, however, this relatively unfamiliar period offers many riches to the modern reader.

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ENL 3241

The Romantic Period

James Twitchell

This is an undergraduate survey of English romantic writers. It is roughly divided into nine parts: an introduction to romanticism, and then eight sections on individual writers. There is, relative to other English courses, little outside reading, as the main concern of the course is a careful reading of selected representative works. This is deceptive, for students might assume that the course will therefore be easy. There will be weekly quizzes (embarrassingly objective for an English course) and two short papers (not necessarily research papers). The quizzes give me a chance to get answers to questions I think are important; the papers give you a chance to form answers to questions you think are important. The class is informal and relaxed, but the quizzes and papers are not. The quizzes stress material covered in class and so it might be suggested that you take good and careful notes.

Texts

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare

Robert Thomson

This course will involve a close study of a dozen or so of the plays and a number of readings from the poems and elsewhere. Emphasis will be laid upon the problem stating - solving - mediating nature of the dramas. This will necessitate a close reading of the texts; a recognition of the dramatic and verbal ironies that abound; close attention to the paradoxes and ambiguities which motivate the actions and observation of the stark oppositions which are continually reiterated.

We will be lead into a contextual study of both the world within and the world without the Elizabethan theatre, with its concern for an orderliness and its doubts and confusions as the new seventeenth century learning questioned and undermined the values and social/political/ religious assumptions of its society. We may then come to appreciate how these great plays and poems still speak to us with immediacy after a span of nearly four hundred years.

I intend to spend time with the following plays and in addition may spare more than a passing glance at one or two others – particularly making use at the beginning of the course of the early plays, Titus Andronicus and Richard III and also The Sonnets.

The Text for the course is The Norton Shakespeare edited by Stephen Greenblatt and others. It is in stock at Goering’s Bookstore. Any recent and annotated text would suffice but since I will be giving references to the texts in the above edition and occasionally referring to its introductory essays and bibliographies, it would be perhaps more prudent to use the recommended text. Throughout the course of the semester I will draw your attention to particularly noteworthy essays and critical studies from the lists given by Greenblatt in his text. My intention is not simply to display my own preferences and prejudices but also to let you know where much of the substance of my discussions of the plays comes from. In addition I will frequently offer you recommended readings of recent criticism that has been published since our text went to press, particularly those arising from new historicist, feminist, psychological and anthropological approaches to the texts. I will also take it upon myself to advise you of the more useful Web-Sites I have encountered, particularly those that offer bibliographical, critical and explicatory information.

Assignments

Two essays will be required of you (each ca. 2500 words) and in addition there will be a number of in-class tests. There will be no final exam.

Oral participation will be expected and rewarded. Absences – I intend to make periodic register checks – will be penalised, as will late papers. Plagiarism which is detected will result in a failing grade for the course.

If at any time you need to see me or discuss a problem I can be reached on the phone, 392-1060, ext 267. My office (Turlington 4342) hours will be 8:00 through 9:00 each morning of classes or by appointment. I can also be reached by email: <rthomson@english.ufl.edu>

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare

Peter L. Rudnytsky

This course will be the third in a four-semester sequence of Shakespeare’s complete works. The plays to be covered will span the years 1599–1605: As You Like It, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, Troilus and Cressida, Measure for Measure, Othello, All’s Well That Ends Well, Timon of Athens, and King Lear. The approach will be primarily psychoanalytic and feminist, but attention will also be given to textual problems. A consideration of Shakespeare’s involvement in the “Poets’ War” with Jonson, Marston, and Dekker will lead us to read some works by these other playwrights. Course requirements are a midterm, final, and one five-page paper. Regular attendance and active participation in class discussions are also expected.

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LIN 3680

Modern English Structure

Marie Nelson

The primary text for the LIN 3680 course to be offered Spring 2003 is Kathryn Riley and Frank Parker’s English Grammar: Prescriptive, Descriptive, Generative, Performance. As their title suggests, Parker and Riley take not one, but four approaches to the structure, or structures (plural), of contemporary English. “Prescriptive grammar,” which has tended to take on consistently negative associations, is introduced with reference to its indebtedness to classical sources, and with an intention to demonstrate its usefulness to students preparing for professions in fields such as English, linguistics, education, communication, speech-language pathology, and ESL. “Descriptive grammar,” also known as “structuralist grammar,” on the other hand, is presented as a series of generalizations about the language English speakers actually speak, rather than pronouncements about how they should speak. “Generative grammar,” also known as “transformational grammar,” is introduced with reference to “descriptive grammar” and to its primary objective: relating the spoken language to its more abstract underlying structures. And “performance grammar” is shown to have a particular value in that it can provide ways to understand sentences and larger texts as they are actually processed by listeners and readers.

Parker and Riley follow a consistent pattern in their presentation of each approach. This pattern, which will provide a basic structure for the LIN3680 course to be offered Spring 2003, involves reference to each “grammar’s” historical background, definition of key terms that are themselves presented with examples, and questions and/or exercises accompanying each topic as it is introduced.

Four tests, consisting of short sequences of essay questions, will be scheduled to coincide with our completion of exercises from each of the four approaches. Occasional additional exercises may be drawn from a collection I call the FFILES (Florida Files), and, depending on time constraints and student interest, we may conclude the term with short analyses of selections from texts that you find to be “linguistically interesting.”

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LIT 3031

Milton, Donne, Dryden

Mel New

This course will read poetry by three of the finest poets in the English language, John Milton, John Donne, and John Dryden. The purpose of the course is not only to learn how to read poetry well, but how to read it with admiration and even affection – how to overcome the jealousy and hostility toward the idea of literature and literary greatness that seem to dominate ideologically driven English professors today and help restore the notion that beauty and truth, intelligence and brilliance, style and substance, are all combined in our master poets to produce the best that human thought engaging, and engaged by, human language can produce . We will approach these poets and their poetry with awe and reverence, and an awareness that it is highly unlikely that anyone we know can produce anything that will endure 35 years after their deaths, much less 350 years. We will be reading Paradise Lost as our major text, along with many of Milton’s other poems, Donne’s love poems, satires, and holy sonnets, and Dryden’s satires and lyrics. This is a course for English majors who like to read and to think about what they read. We will watch no movies, there are no John Donne video games that I know of, and we won’t even have a chat room.

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LIT 3041

Studies in Drama: Tudor/Stuart Drama

Ira Clark

In LIT 3041 we will read about one non-Shakespearean play per week from the greatest era for English drama, perhaps the greatest era for drama in any language – from the middle of Elizabeth’s reign to the closing of the theaters in 1642. We will focus on understanding these plays in a number of contexts such as stage conditions; illusion/reality/representation; language, rhetoric, and style; the development of techniques and genres; and social, political, and theological conditions.

The course will proceed along lines of generic development throughout the period. In the first part we will read tragedies by Kyd, Marlow, Webster, and others; in the second, comedies by Dekker, Beaumont, Jonson, and others; in the third, Marston and Beaumont & Fletcher. Throughout the course students will take 11 unannounced brief quizzes (40% of the grade). At the end of each part students will be responsible for a paper: Paper I on a tragedy (about 3,000 words, 15% of the grade) Paper II on a comedy (about 3,000 words, 20% of the grade), Paper III on any non-Shakespearean play of the era not assigned to the class (about 5,000 words, 25% of the grade).

Our focus will be on developing students’ skills and knowledge towards two ends: first, in order to enjoy reading knowledgably and independently such famous plays as The Spanish Tragedy, Tamburlaine I, The Duchess of Malfi, The Shoemakers Holiday, Bartholomew Fair, A King and No King; second, in order to speak and write convincingly.

The full syllabus is posted to my web page. Taking a Shakespeare course alongside this one could prove valuable for both.

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LIT 3043

Modern Drama – Doing It

Sid Homan

The focus of this course is performance: students (not to mention the teacher) learn about the modern theatre by doing it. With a scene partner, each students works up two or three scenes, performs them in class, and then “works” the scene with the teacher serving as director. No prior acting experience is required, and over the years there has been no advantage for, say, Theatre majors: that is, a would-be engineer does as well as a theatre major who does no better than an English major. Scene work is graded on “intent,” what the scene partners put into the scene in this, theatre, the most labor intensive of activities. We will look at Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Harold Pinter’s The Lesson and Old Times, and Sam Shepard’s True West. Students will also attend two performances of the “Evening with the Playwrights” series at the Acrosstown Repertory Theatre, and report on their experience with performances focusing on Samuel Beckett and George Bernard Shaw. And they will attend a performance of Shakespeare’s As You Like It, and report on a score of modern music especially commissioned for that production. To be sure, the playwrights will be put in the context of their critical and theatrical history, even as this course itself is based on actual performance.

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LIT 3043

Studies in Modern Drama: Texts Against Performance

Apollo O. Amoko

This course addresses the centrality of performance to the aesthetics of drama. Specifically, we will examine the implications of studying dramatic plays in contexts that do not typically take account of performance. Most of us are unlikely to watch performances of the vast majority of the plays we study. Our comments regarding performance, if at all existent, tend therefore to be conjectural and hypothetical. The course will revolve around two antithetical arguments. The first argument insists on the singularity and irreducibility of performance for the dramatic aesthetic. At its most extreme, this view suggests that all readings of plays that do not derive from the experience of performance are necessarily incomplete and inadequate. The second argument suggests, counter-intuitively perhaps, that the experience of performance, beyond being unnecessary, may actually inhibit our capacity to read dramatic texts. According to this argument, the charismatic body of the actor interrupts and distorts critical textual engagement. As well, the inexorable unfolding of dramatic performances in real time prevents close reading, re-reading, cross-referencing and so on all of which are indispensable for informed criticism. Which are these two positions is right? Are texts and performances as mutually opposed to each other as the two arguments imply? This course will be based in part on the Gainesville Theatre season for 2003 and will include the following plays: August Wilson’s Fences, Edward Albee’s The Play About the Baby, William Shakespeare’s As You Like It and Ntozake Shange’s Lavander Lizards and Lilac Landmines. We will also examine the work of Anna Devere Simth, a performance artist who began her career with an activist aesthetic emphasizing live performance but whose work is increasingly canonized in textual form. We will also examine the plays of the Kenyan writer Ngugi wa Thiong’o in particular the texts of famed Kamiirithu Theatre experiment, a short-lived project in activist drama in rural Kenya that have become the object of extensive analysis in the Western academy mostly by people who never watched either of its productions.

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LIT 4194

African Literature in English

Mildred Hill-Lubin

Office: 4334 TUR
Telephone: 392-6650, Ext. 260
Office Hours: Tuesday and Thursday, 7th period 1:45-2:45pm
E-Mail: mahl@english.ufl.edu

Purpose: To provide a critical and analytical study of representative Black African authors writing in English with particular focus on the writings of the Ghanaian women author, Ama Ata Aidoo. The writings of Chinua Achebe and Wole Soyinka will complete the syllabus. We will concentrate on the thematic and stylistic features which make this literature, peculiarly African. References will be made to themes and features in this literature which may be found in Black Literature throughout the diaspora, particularly Francophone and African American Literature of the United States. Attention will also be given to locating these writers within the body of American/British literature.

“To try to remind ourselves and our brothers and lovers and colleagues that we exist should not be taken as something foreign, as something bad. African women struggling both on behalf of themselves and on behalf of the wider community is very much a part of our heritage. It is not new and I really refuse to be told I am learning feminism from abroad..”. – Ama Ata Aidoo in Criticism and Ideology

Texts

Texts may be purchased at the Campus Bookstore or The African Violet, 424 NW 13th Street, Suite B. Telephone:336-2606.

Requirements

  1. Assignments should be read before class and students are expected to attend class and participate in class discussions.
  2. Mid-term Examination
  3. Two Quizzes over specific works
  4. One 10–15 page Final Paper

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LIT 4322

The Folktale

Robert Thomson

For the purposes of this course, the term folktale will be held to encompass all forms of orally transmitted prose narratives including myths, legends, memorates and wonder-tales.No knowledge of the folktale nor of the general field of folklore studies is assumed by the instructor. The first week or so of the course will attempt to orient all students to the place of the folktale in folklore studies. The three required texts have been chosen to give a representative collection of all types of prose narrative. While covering the major aspects of the familiar European tradition the texts will also bring to our attention the ethnic traditions of the United States, particularly the oral narratives recorded from Native Americans in Wisconsin at the turn of the nineteenth/twentieth centuries and African Americans in Eatonville, Florida in the 1920’s and ‘30’s. In addition, we will address those issues that have for half a century kept theorists and analysts struggling with the complexities of these “simple forms.”

Texts

All the above texts are available from Goering’s Bookstore.

In addition to the study of tales within the texts above, we will address the following topics:

There will be 3 tests given at roughly three week intervals during the course. In addition two reports, each of about 2500 words will be required. Grades will based upon the tests (10% each test) the reports (30% each report) and class participation etc.

I will be available on class days between 9.00 and 10.00 am. In addition I can arrange appointments if you phone me at 392-6650, ext267. My office is in Turlington Hall – Rm.4342. Email rthomson@english.ufl.edu

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LIT 4331

Children’s Literature

Kenneth Kidd

This course surveys children’s literature from its inception as a genre (or set of genres) to its present interdisciplinary and popular material forms. It has three objectives: 1) to review the rich history and multiple incarnations of children’s literature; 2) to use literary criticism and theory to illuminate children’s literature (and vice versa); and 3) to help future and practicing teachers evaluate the literary, artistic, psychological, and socio-political merit of written and multi-media texts. We will concentrate on literary and cultural analysis rather than pedagogy; this is not a teaching methods course.

Texts (subject to change)

Students will write 10 short weekly response papers, as well as three longer analytical essays. Regular attendance and participation are vital.

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LIT 4331

Children’s Literature

James Haskins

Course Description

The course will examine picture books, board books, counting books, video and audiotapes, as well as a history of each genre, with special emphasis on classism, racism and sexism. Reports on reviewing services and the major awards in children’s literature will be assigned, as well as class discussion and reports on multi-ethnic literature, with emphasis on African American, Asian, Latino and Native American literature.

Required Texts

Requirements

Research Paper

One research paper of 10-15 typed, double-spaced pages (topics to be cleared with me before beginning work), due in the English Department office no later than 4:00 PM, Friday of “dead week.” A box with my name and course number will be available there. Do not put papers on my office door.

Grading

Your grade for this course will be calculated as follows:

Office hours

Wednesdays 10:30-1:00 or by appointment before/after class on Tuesdays and Thursdays

Contact Info

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LIT 4333

Literature for Adolescents

James Haskins

The course will examine literature appropriate for adolescent and young adult audiences, with special emphasis on the sociopolitical and psychological interpretations of the various genres. Genres to be explored will include nonfiction, historical and modern fiction, and literature for the young-adult audience dealing with contemporary themes of interest, as well as the problem novel. Issues such as censorship, religious themes, intercultural and interracial dating, abortion, and substance abuse will be discussed. Group discussions will be emphasized, and individuals as well as groups of students will be assigned reports and asked to lead class discussions on authors and book topics.

Reading and Writing Assignments

Required Text

Required Supplementary Readings

Grading

Your grade for this course will be calculated as follows:

Office hours

Wednesdays 10:30-1:00 or by appointment before/after class on Tuesdays and Thursdays

Contact Info

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LIT 4535

Women and Popular Culture: Vamps, Virgins or Vampires?

Stephanie Smith

Although we all know what a woman is, and where the domain of popular culture lies, this course will begin with the assumption that we don’t. Across the semester, we will be involved in a critical investigation of two central questions: What is popular culture? and How is a “woman” constituted by it? In order to explore these questions, we will examine a range of “texts” that have served, and continue to serve, as central, defining objects of widespread fascination, both in the United States, and as international exports. There will be three units to the class, each devoted to a sexual, iconographic figure:

Required readings

Books will be available at Iris Books on W. University 375-7477

Requirements

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LIT 4930

Children, Culture, and Violence

John Cech

Children, Culture, and Violence will examine a wide range of traditional and contemporary cultural texts containing violent elements that are intended for children, or that have become part of children’s experiences, whether or not they were originally meant for children. The course will explore the ways in which violence appears in works of folklore (nursery rhymes, fairy and folktales, and child-generated rhymes, games, songs, jokes, and other oral material); 18th and 19th century didactic works; comics and comic books; realistic fiction (from Mark Twain to Robert Cormier and Chris Lynch); picture books (e.g. the works of Maurice Sendak, Tomi Ungerer, and Edward Gorey); series fiction (e.g. the Goosebumps books and Lemony Snickett’s saga of the unfortunate Baudelaire children); animated and live-action films (from Disney’s early Mickey Mouse cartoons to the recent “Fresh”); and a sampling of contemporary lyrics from rap and other popular musical forms. It will make use of such critics and theorists as Jack Zipes, Bruno Bettelheim, Alice Miller, Sisella Bok, Neil Postman, Allan Guggenbühl, Henry Jenkins, and others. One purpose of the course will be to distinguish between the kinds of violence that can be found in this broad spectrum of cultural materials. But a vital dimension of this exploration will be to try to assess the ways that these works affect children as well as the larger dynamics of family and community of which they are a part.

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LIT 4930

Race and Gender in Contemporary Latina/o Literature 1985–2001

Tace Hedrick

From the late 1960s through the 1970s, a Chicana/o and Latino/a “renaissance” of the arts flowered, especially in the Southwest and on the East Coast; now, the so-called Latin explosion in the United States has increased the market value of “Latino” authors and artists. A select few Chicano and Latina writers have been drawn into the mainstream of United States publishing: Sandra Cisneros, Esmeralda Santiago, and Oscar Hijuelos are, if not household names, at least well-known on bestseller lists. In reading such bestselling authors as well as less well-known artists, this course will examine the ways assumptions – esthetic, political, and market-driven–about ethnicity, race, and gender have changed (and in some ways remained the same) in the 15 years between 1985 and 2001. This course will require three papers and regular reading quizzes.

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LIT 4930

Advertising and Culture

James Twitchell

Although there are courses in advertising and advertisements, this course attempts to chart the history of a culture – our popular culture – as it has been defined and conveyed by commercial speech. We will discuss the history and changing definition of advertising; the effects of commercial discourse on our sense of self, time, and place; and essentially argue that advertising has become, like religion, one of the primary institutions of our “sociosphere.” The course is not a criticism but an exploration. “Advertising and Culture” is not a course intended to teach advertising techniques and practices to professional or pre-professional students.

Texts

Requirements

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LIT 4930

Writing Biography

James Haskins

The course will provide an overview of biographical literature’s various styles and approaches and of the research methods used to gather biographical information. A broad range of readings will be assigned, as will relevant television programs. Biographical literature discussed will include the first-person autobiography, “as told to” and “written with” autobiographies, and third-person narratives. Various historical, political, and psychological approaches will be examined, as well as straight, chronological narratives versus impressionistic or event-based frameworks.

Reading and Writing Assignments

Required Readings

Books:

Periodicals Selected readings from the following periodicals:

Supplementary Readings:

Assignments

There will be six written assignments: two based on interviews and interviewing techniques; three based on biographies; and one biography term paper. Additionally, there will be assigned oral reports. All students, whether as individuals or in groups, will be assigned classroom reports.

Written Assignments on Interviews:

Written Assignments on Print Biographies:

Research Paper:

Grading

Your grade for this course will be calculated as follows:

Office Hours

Wednesdays 10:30-1:00 period or before/after class on Tuesdays and Thursdays, or by appointment.

Contact Info

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LIT 4930

World Englishes

Roger M. Thompson

Office: MWF 8 (3:00-3:50) TUR 4337
Phone: 392-6650 ext 263
Email: <rthomson@english.ufl.edu>
Class home page: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/rthompso/globalenglish.html

The English language has more than one billion speakers world wide. Many millions speak English as a native language, many more speak English as a second language, but most speak it as a foreign language. However, English is more than a language that people learn to express their thoughts. It is also a social phenomenon that promotes and reinforces certain types of social behavior. Some say that English is a deadly virus that is permeating the world and destroying local cultures. Others say it is a benevolent medicine that will cure the ills of the world as it promotes social and economic advancement. Whatever the case, we will take note of the linguistic differences among the various versions of English used around the world and look at the sociolinguistics that surrounds English in various settings.

Resources:

Reserve Reading:

Grades:

Total is divided by 100 and grades are assigned 90-100 A, 87-89 B+, 80-86 B, 77-79 C+, 70-76 C, 67-69 D+, 60-66 D, 59 and lower E.

Schedule:

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SPC 3605

Speechwriting

Ron Carpenter

Speechwriting is an advanced composition course. In SPC 3605, students acquire stylistic prowess by which their sentences have increased potential for memorability and quotability, ease and accuracy of comprehension, as well as overall persuasiveness. The course is called Speechwriting because models of eloquence to be imitated are in sentences of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, John Kennedy, and Martin Luther King, Jr., for examples. Although you practice these stylistic skills while writing speeches, the acquired prowess is applicable in virtually any future communication endeavors, as speakers or writers, regardless of profession.

SPC 3605 is not about supporting arguments or organizing them into broader discourse. If you seek those skills, other courses are more appropriate. Speechwriting is about how to select the best words and arrange them in their best orders – within sentences – to achieve optimal impress of your ideas upon readers or listeners. These stylistic skills are practiced and perfected in drafts that you aloud among peers (and for me) during our “lab” periods, wherein you should acquire a refined sense of how to achieve the final product desired at the semester end. Thus, present drafts when due; listen carefully to other students’ drafts, comparing yours with theirs; participate in rewriting others’ sentences; and heed my commentary about all drafts. Do not assume that “participation” means simply presenting your drafts and listening only to commentary about them.

How a draft is presented, vocally and physically, has no bearing on your grade (for help with delivery skills other courses are appropriate; I may make suggestions about how to improve your platform presence, however). The important point is that Speechwriting is an advanced composition course, wherein you read drafts aloud as bases of discussion by which all students understand how and why some sentences are better than others. For initial and final drafts, I require word processing available in computer labs on campus (if you do not have your own computer). Revision on your disk is easier; spelling is accurate; and word lengths of drafts are known.

From past experience, I know that reasonably diligent students achieve a substantial measure of the stylistic skills taught in this course. Final grades are higher, however, as you (1) demonstrate refined prowess as the competent stylist on exams and in final drafts, (2) understand course precepts derived from readings and lecture materials, as tested by three exams during the semester (the course has no final exam), and (3) produce a final research paper about style as defined in this course (research paper options will be explained during a lecture relatively early in the semester and will require additional library reading). Final grades are determined one–half by the average of your three exam scores and one–half by the quality of your final notebook with polished drafts of speeches and the research paper – all typed, double–spaced, and turned in during exam week at the time and date listed in the University Timetable as the course final exam period. The textbook for the course is Ronald H. Carpenter, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works; it can be purchased at Goerings’ Book Store at Bageland.

Although this is a writing course, I also am impressed – for grading purposes – by how much you know about style as defined in this class. Please appreciate the fact that this composition course is unlike virtually all other persuasive writing courses at the University of Florida, for the expertise and confidence in the precepts being taught are derived from your instructor’s own published research in four scholarly press books, several book chapters, and numerous research journal articles (all of which informed my writing of your textbook). Furthermore, from my experience as a communications consultant for organizations outside the university (such as corporate executives, lawyers, civic leaders, hospital administrators, public relations professionals, and officers attending the U.S. Naval War College), I know that skills taught in this course are useful in the “real” world.

In conclusion, teaching you to be eloquent stylists gives me great personal satisfaction. For I can make positive changes in your behaviors as communicators. If you join me in this endeavor, which admittedly entails some substantial effort on your part, I promise you will acquire valuable skills that will be admired by others as well as be useful for the rest of your life, no matter what your later profession might be. The only prerequisite for the course is that you can write grammatical sentences that are punctuated correctly.

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SPC 4680

Rhetorical Criticism: Masterpeices of Rhetoric

Ron Carpenter

Rhetorical Criticism has as its focus several “masterpieces of rhetoric.” Although several of these are in the realm of political and presidential discourse, another focus this semester will be upon rhetorical efforts to persuade Americans to engage in armed conflict with other nations. Thus, students will examine how some speakers, writers, and film makers appealed successfully to specific attitudes and actions with profound influence upon the course of events. The primary goal of the course is to provide students will a refined sense of some rhetorical principles and techniques by which their own future discourse is more effective persuasively. Please note: “rhetoric” is not a pejorative word. In its current and inaccurate usage, the word often is prefaced with the adjective “empty” to disparage what “other” people say or write ostensibly as groundless emotional appeal in contradistinction to discourse that presumably only “tells it like it is.” But accurately, “rhetoric” refers to those means by which discourse “adjusts ideas to people and people to ideas.” So rhetoric is the art of persuasion, and rhetorical criticism identifies and assesses what was done with words (and other factors) to achieve persuasion.

Students will write five short papers (3–4 typed pages) that summarize and expand briefly upon assigned readings, films, or group projects (one of these must be the enthymemic persuasion of me). A longer final paper (8–10 typed pages) will report library research about some topic suggested by the course (the focus of that paper must be developed in consultation with your instructor). The course will have a “take home” final exam. Please understand that your group projects will require meetings with your student peers outside regular class periods. Students also are required to view some films outside of class. The textbook is Halford Ryan, Contemporary American Public Discourse: A Collection of Speeches and Critical Essays. It is available at Goerings Book Store, next to Bageland.

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