Undergraduate Courses, Fall 2004

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Upper Division (3000–4000) Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

AML 3041

American Fiction Since 1865

David Leverenz

This course will focus on fictional narratives of cross-ethnic or cross-cultural experiences. We will begin with Henry James’s Daisy Miller, about a young American woman in Italy, then turn to chapter 1 of W. E. B. Du Bois’s Souls of Black Folk and James Weldon Johnson’s narrative of passing in America and Europe, Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man. Then we will take up a series of classics:

The course will conclude with discussions of Edwidge Danticat’s Breath, Eyes, Memory (1994), about a 12-year-old girl who moves from Haiti to Brooklyn, and Azar Nafisi’s recent best-seller, Reading Lolita in Tehran. Before considering Nafisi’s book, which passionately engages Daisy Miller and Lolita in the context of the Iranian revolution, we may have time to choose another narrative or two, perhaps Rudolfo Anaya’s Bless Me, Ultima (1972) or Ellen Douglas’s Can’t Quit You, Baby (1988), or other novels suggested by the class. For kicks we might end with Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Tarzan of the Apes.

Work required: an initial close-reading exercise (5%), three 4–6 pp. comparative close readings (25% each, with credit for improvement), weekly take-home quizzes (20%). The lowest quiz grade will be dropped. No exams. Grading will be based entirely on your writing, though late essays or more than four unexcused class cuts (double period = 2 classes) will lower your grade. The more absences over the maximum, the lower the grade becomes. Excused absences can be made up with extra writing about the text(s) discussed that day.

I give A’s to essays using an original and spirited argument to illuminate complexities of language as well as theme. I give B+’s to well organized, well developed, relatively error-free essays with sparks of originality or daring, and B’s to competent essays needing more complex development and/or clearer focus. Lower grades mean greater problems with development, organization, and grammar. Recurrent grammatical errors lower the grade; spelling errors and typos don’t, within reason. The best essays sustain complex and/or audacious arguments; a good “B” essay will capably summarize and compare themes. I encourage “prewrites,” if handed in a week before the assignment is due.

Grades will be based entirely on students’ writing. I don’t include class participation in the grading because I try to make class sessions non-judgmental and relaxed, so that anyone can try out ideas without feeling silly, weird, or stupid. To find out more, come by my office at 4362 Turlington. My office hours this Spring are Tuesday 2–4 p.m., Thursday 12:45–1:45 p.m., and by arrangement. Please feel free to call me at home (371-7461, before 9:30 p.m.) or at the office (392-6650 x283), or e-mail me <ldavid@english.ufl.edu>.

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AML 3284

Survey in American Women’s Literatures

Alison Van Nyhuis

This survey of American women’s literature will focus on providing some answers to the question “What is American women’s literature?” – that is, who is an “American,” what is “America,” what is “women’s literature,” and what are the specific problems and concerns associated with identifying a literary tradition associated with American women?  The course will begin with a brief overview of creation stories, captivity narratives, and Puritan poetry. But the course will primarily focus on 19th and 20th century literature written by women, including essays, memoirs, novels, poetry, and short stories. Authors we may discuss include Mary Rowlandson, Anne Bradstreet, Lydia Maria Child, Margaret Fuller, Fanny Fern, Harriet Jacobs, Kate Chopin, Emily Dickinson, Gertrude Stein, Nella Larsen, Muriel Rukeyser, Sylvia Plath, Michelle Cliff, Jamaica Kincaid, and Cristina Garcia.

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AML 3285

What is Native American Literature?

Susan Hegeman

This survey of literature by Native American authors from the 19th and 20th centuries will focus on providing some answers to the question “What is Native American literature?” – that is, who is a “Native American,” what is “literature,” and what are the specific problems and concerns associated with identifying a literary tradition associated with a diverse group of indigenous peoples? Authors we may discuss include Sherman Alexie, Louise Erdrich, N. Scott Momaday, John Rollin Ridge, Leslie Marmon Silko, Gerald Vizenor, and James Welsh.

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AML 3285

Introduction to Asian-American Studies

Malini Schueller

This course is an introduction to the central critical debates in Asian American studies as well as to major cultural and literary texts. Accordingly, the readings span a temporal range of Asian-American cultural production as well as the debates generated by the institutionalization of Asian-American studies to the present moment. We will read the work of critics such as Lisa Lowe, Rey Chow, Gary Okihiro and David Palumbo-Liu as well as important fictional and non-fictional works by Asian American writers. The course includes writings by Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, and Filipino Americans, as well as Amerasians, but the point is not simply to emphasize the cultural and national multiplicity of Asian-American writing. Rather, the readings are organized according to major questions that frame Asian-American writing across different national boundaries: the narration of cultural conflict; stereotypes and cultural identity; racial difference; gender and ethnicity; postcolonial subjectivities; and racializing labor. At the center of the readings is the complex question of what it means to be Asian-American in the U.S.

Possible Texts:

Requirements: mid-terms; two or three short papers; possible oral presentation.

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AML 4225

Poe and Twain

David Leverenz

This course focuses on an odd couple, Poe and Twain, with more emphasis on Twain, to see how or whether the juxtaposition illuminates their writings or their intimate alienations from antebellum and postbellum America. The first few weeks will take up a variety of Poe’s stories: some of the well-known horror tales, two Dupin detective tales, and also some of his less familiar satires and wacky experiments – “Loss of Breath,” “Lionizing,” “How to Write a Blackwood Article,” “The Man That Was Used Up,” “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar,” “Hop-Frog,” as well as “The Gold-Bug” and Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym. We may also read “The Philosophy of Composition,” about his writing of “The Raven.” I’ll presume that you’ve already read “Ligeia” and “The Fall of the House of Usher”; if not, those tales will jump-start our discussions.

The second two thirds of the course will consider some of Mark Twain’s narratives, from “the Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” and “Private History of a Campaign that Failed” to Roughing It, Life on the Mississippi, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, and Pudd’nhead Wilson. I’ll presume that you’ve already read Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. If we have time, we’ll also read “Fenimore Cooper’s Literary Offences,” excerpts from the diaries of Adam and Eve, the “Hellfire Hotchkiss” fragment, and the first version of The Mysterious Stranger.

Work required: an initial close-reading exercise (5%), a 4–6 pp. comparative close reading (25%), a 12–15 pp. research essay (50%) or two more 5–6 pp. comparative close readings, weekly take-home quizzes (20%). The lowest quiz grade will be dropped. No exams. Grading will be based entirely on your writing, though late essays or more than four unexcused class cuts (double period = 2 classes) will lower your grade. The more absences over the maximum, the lower the grade becomes. Excused absences can be made up with extra writing about the text(s) discussed that day.

I give A’s to essays using an original and spirited argument to illuminate complexities of language as well as theme. I give B+’s to well organized, well developed, relatively error-free essays with sparks of originality or daring, and B’s to competent essays needing more complex development and/or clearer focus. Lower grades mean greater problems with development, organization, and grammar. Recurrent grammatical errors lower the grade; spelling errors and typos don’t, within reason. The best essays sustain complex and/or audacious arguments; a good “B” essay will capably summarize and compare themes. I encourage “prewrites,” if handed in a week before the assignment is due, and I’d be happy to comment on drafts of the research essay.

If you want to know more about the course, call me at home (371-7461, before 9:30 p.m.) or e-mail me <ldavid@english.ufl.edu>. Or just come see me at Turlington 4362; I’m there most days.

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AML 4225

America In Print

Stephanie Smith

In 1846, critic and writer Margaret Fuller published an essay titled, “American Literature: Its Position in the Present Time, and Prospects for the Future,” in which she surveyed the field, as it were, of her time and made predictions for the future – our future. Returning to that essay as a launching point, this class is going to re-examine our 19th-century “American” literary heritage, what it was, what it might mean or have meant, and where it went after 1846, with a particular focus on print as a medium, the publishing industry and American print culture of the 19th century.

All titles will be available at Wild Iris Books, 802 W. University Avenue. 375-7477. Supplemental readings will be provided by instructor, either in hard-copy or online.

Requirements: A reading journal, a mid-term project and a final paper.

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AML 4242

Reading Literature and New Media

Aron Pease

This course will examine American fiction since 1945, paying particular attention to its post-Fordist technological context. Texts include print and digital media, novels, poetry, hypertexts, and e-mail. Students will be introduced to media theory and cybernetics, as well as concepts from postmodern literary and cultural theory. We will consider how different writing projects respond to changing media or technological environments and their revision of the (post)human. In part, this means considering how to read literature in a new media ecology, in which the early 20th century’s separation of media is reorganized into a digitally connected media system of systems. Above all, we will focus on the materiality of media, as well as writers and readers, and how this emphasis affects how we read new digital media forms and, subsequently, print literature.

Texts:

Available at Goering’s at Bageland:

Available at Custom Copies:

Course Packet (includes writings by Acker, Borges, Cadigan, Gaddis, Gibson, Jameson, Kittler, and Virno.)

Available online:

Course Requirements and Grading: weekly writing/responses and class participation (25%); two short essays (25%); final research essay (50%).

Course webpage: <http://www.clas.ufl.edu/~apease/AML4242.html>.

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AML 4453

Studies in American Literature and Culture: The Novel in the Early Republic

Emily Garcia

The publication of novels written by U.S. authors increased immensely after the adoption of the Constitution.  The passage of a federal Copyright Act in 1790 further influenced the composition and distribution of novels in the U.S. In this course we will read six novels that speak to the anxieties and complexities of the early republic.  We will pay attention to style and form (the novels emerge from the gothic, picaresque and sentimental traditions) as well as notions of early American identity.  Readings will address questions of authorship, the history of the book, political discourse, print culture, citizenship, personal freedom, and the cultures of American Indians, slaves and women in the republic.

The course will end with Crèvecoeur’s Letters from an American Farmer.  Published in England in 1782 and only loosely considered a novel, Crèvecoeur’s text will allow us to revisit the semester’s discussions through the context of the Revolution.  In addition to generic and thematic comparisons, we will compare Crèvecoeur’s idea of “What is an American?” (the book’s most famous chapter) with those that we gleaned from earlier readings.

Despite their historical and social implications, class discussions and assignments will always be grounded in the process of close reading, reading that is rigorous and yet subtle.  The course aims to develop each student’s ability to conduct such reading and express it coherently and persuasively.      

Assignments and discussions will most often concern short passages in a text; arguments will evolve from the comparison of several passages or from the situation of a passage (or passages) in a critical framework.  We will read one novel every two weeks.  Some critical essays (available on reserve) will also be assigned.

Required Texts (in order of the reading schedule)

Texts will be available at Wild Iris Books, 375-7477.

Assignments and Grading

Attendance policy: Each unexcused absence after four will lower your final grade by one step (a B becomes a B– for example).

Feel free to email me at <egarcia@clas.ufl.edu> if you would like more information about the course.

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CRW 3110

Reading and Writing Short Stories

David Leavitt

What is a short story? No genre has so consistently eluded definition. Stories can range from eighty pages (Thomas Mann’s “Death in Venice”) to a single sentence (Amy Hempel’s “Housewife”). The purpose of this seminar will be to explore the parameters of this seductive and evasive form, from the standpoint both of the practitioner and the reader.

The seminar will be built around the idea that writers learn by reading. Therefore you may find the reading load heavier than is typical for a fiction workshop. Each week you will be asked to read a selection of stories by an English or American writer, and to arrive in class prepared to discuss them cogently. This conversation will take up roughly a third of our allotted time; the other two-thirds will be devoted to discussion of your own work (presented according to a pre-arranged schedule) and occasional in-class exercises.

For the first several weeks, I’ll be giving you assignments of a vaguely experimental nature – for instance, to tell a story from the viewpoint of an historical figure of your own choosing (Janis Joplin, Jack the Ripper). You’ll then set to work on stories of your own devising, which may have evolved from these exercises. The requirement of the class, in terms of writing, is that you complete two stories, the first by midterm and the second by term’s end. (The second may be an outgrowth of the first.) It goes without saying that attendance is mandatory, and that failure to show up (along with failure to do the reading) will have an adverse effect on your final grade. Grading will be based on your informed participation in the seminar, the critical acuity you show when judging other students’ writing, and your willingness to work hard: to be the best writer you can be, and to emerge at the end of the semester a better writer than you were at the beginning.

The reading many include stories by John Cheever, William Trevor, Alice Munro, Flannery O’Connor, Grace Paley, Deborah Eisenberg, Allan Gurganus, Amy Hempel and W.G. Sebald.

Final note: although flexibility is essential to any writing workshop, so is structure. The same can be said – and must be said – of the writing process.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.).

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by March 19, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry

William Logan

“Poorly depicted clouds which most people would not notice as wrong are so disturbing to Dr. Thornes that they almost spoil visits to museums. For a meteorologist, the distraction is as great as the ordinary viewer being confronted by a figure with three arms. . . . [He added that] too many artists had painted [clouds] as they would a backcloth in a theatre.”

The Guardian (London), 9 August 2000

Whenever the Mauretania was signaled by a French island, “What ship are you?” she would signal in reply, “What island are you?”

– Terry Coleman, The Liners

In this workshop we will attend to words as closely as a painter attends to paint – or to clouds. You will read a broad selection of modern poetry, from Walt Whitman to Gjertrud Schnackenberg, and write a poem a week. Every week the workshop will consider for discussion poems from the past and poems from students. We will attempt to find a place for frivolity and fecklessness within the seriousness of verse, and hope that within our studies cheerfulness will keep breaking in. The workshop will include readings in the poetry of the past century as well as the poetry of the age, and we will spend a few weeks on versification. If you haven’t had an introduction to meter, you will need it to understand what Shakespeare, Milton, Pope, Keats, Byron, Coleridge, Frost, Stevens, and even Eliot thought they were doing. An ear not partly tuned by meter can never write free verse effectively.

This is an advanced workshop in poetry, for students who have already taken the intermediate workshop (CRW 2300) and want to press further their understanding of poetic language. Early admission is by manuscript. Please submit the manuscript, using the guidelines boxed below, to the instructor’s mailbox or by email to <wlogan@english.ufl.edu>.

Required reading:

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.).

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by March 19, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 3310

Advanced Poetry Workshop

Sidney Wade

This is an advanced poetry workshop designed to expand the poet’s understanding of what it’s possible to accomplish in a poem. We will be closely studying and explicating poems and then imitating their rhetorical, formal, vocal, and imagistic strategies. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of models. Each student will be expected to lead the class discussion in an explication of one of the model poems.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.).

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by March 19, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 4905

Independent Work in Fiction

Padgett Powell

This course is the last in our series of undergraduate workshops in fiction writing. Its objective is to help you or make you write better fiction, arguably the objective of any workshop worth anything. As the last of our courses, however, this one seeks to make the three or so pieces you will tender lasting, able-bodied fictions you can show off, apply to graduate programs with, or publish. The fall is the time to prepare manuscripts for submission to graduate schools in writing if you are intending to prosecute that voyage. This is also the time you become the best undergraduate writer of fiction you can become.

Standard workshop format. I anticipate full efforts at writing well, at criticizing for the benefit of others, at attending religiously, at speaking cogently when you can, at surrounding yourself in the mantle of intelligent reticence when you can’t.

We will read two books of fiction as technical models selected from among William Trevor, Kent Haruf, Flannery O’Connor, Lydia Davis, Franz Kafka, and Samuel Beckett. And others, should something come up.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.).

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by March 19, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 4905

Advanced Seminar in Fiction Writing

Jill Ciment

This course is an advanced fiction workshop. Basically, it will be run in the “traditional” workshop fashion with occasional lectures on structure, metaphor, plot, etc. Some writing exercises will be assigned at the beginning, but the primary emphasis is on self generated work. Each student will be expected to write two short stories, as well as complete a final draft of each.

Optimally, students will turn in stories that they have taken as far as they can on their own. The workshop should be a venue to test the waters, to try new things, to present first drafts as well as polished works, but only after the writer has struggled with it to the nth degree. The idea is for students to rigorously challenge themselves. Everyone not presenting work should take their jobs as critics and editors as seriously as they take their own writing.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.).

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by March 19, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 4906

Senior Advanced Seminar in Poetry Writing

Debora Greger

We read. We write. We discuss. We revise.

“One of the more outlandish achievements of Thomas Mann’s daughter, Elisabeth Mann Borgese, was to train an English setter to play piano duets with her. To this end she had a special piano made with no legs and no black notes, and with keys twice as wide as normal. A visitor wrote of one performance: ‘Mrs. Mann Borgese sat down on the floor at the left of the keyboard, and the dog took his place to the right of middle C. They performed two short duets, one by Schumann and the other by Mozart. The dog – although he had good rhythm – made a few mistakes, but she explained this by saying he’d gone for three weeks without practicing while she was away.’”

The Daily Telegraph, London

“I enjoy watching wildlife even more than gardening. For this purpose, I constructed a bird table just outside my study window. It is surrounded by wire and netting to keep out the larger birds and birds of prey, which tend to scare off their smaller brethren. This is not always sufficient to keep them away, however. Occasionally, I am compelled to take out one of the air guns that I acquired shortly after arriving in India, in order to discipline these fat, greedy trespassers. Having spent a great deal of time as a child at the Norbulingka practicing with the Thirteenth’s old air rifle, I am quite a good shot. Of course, I never kill them. My intention is only to inflict a measure of pain in order to teach them a lesson.”

– the Dalai Lama

This is an advanced workshop in poetry, for students who have already taken CRW 2300, CRW 3310, or CRW 4906. This course may be taken more than once for credit. Early admission is by manuscript. Guidelines for submission are linked to below:

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.).

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by March 19, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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ENC 3250

Professional Communication

Wayne Losano

This upper-division professional communication course will consist of an intense review of grammar, mechanics, and style appropriate to writing in the “real” (as opposed to the academic) world, with an emphasis on concreteness and economy. Topics covered include the publication of professional articles, conference and other oral presentations, proposal writing, short communication formats (nonformal reports, business letters, etc.) and graphics. Four or five papers plus in-class writing/editing exercises.

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ENC 3254

Professional Writing in the Discipline

Instructor Varies (call 392–5421)

Except for 2 sections that are reserved for Education majors, this course is offered out of the Dial Center for Written and Oral Communication. N.B.: English majors should be aware that because the UF Undergraduate Catalog defines the requirement for the English major as ten courses “offered by the department,” the sections of ENC 3254 offered by the Dial Center for Written and Oral Communication cannot be counted toward the major.

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ENC 3310

Advanced Expository Writing

Wayne Losano

This is a standard, traditional (old-fashioned) composition course focusing on familiar rhetorical modes of development (narrative, description, analysis, etc.) with a heavy emphasis on style and rhetorical effectiveness and perhaps a nod towards “creative nonfiction.” Four or five papers plus analysis of selected essays and assorted in-class writing activities.

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ENC 3312

Advanced Argumentative Writing

Patricia Schmidt

Course description not available at this time.

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ENC 3312

Advanced Argumentative Writing

Patricia Schmidt

Course description not available at this time.

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ENC 4212

Professional Editing

Patricia Craddock

“Professional” Editing is the skill and art of preparing a document for presentation or publication as a part of someone’s profession. Editing is not about research and conceptualization, but it may be about organization or about gaps in research or arguments. Professional editors must learn to improve other people’s writing as well as their own. It is the editor’s job to make sure that there is nothing about the use of English in the work that will strike its anticipated audience as incorrect, confusing, or inappropriate; ideally, an editor also helps an author, whether or not the editor is the author, to interest and persuade the target audience. In this course we will study and practice these skills. We will focus on mastering features of editing that matter in real life to the members of the class; for instance, whenever possible we will address issues specific to the kinds of documents the class members expect to be writing. We will, however, spend much of our time on issues common to all kinds of editing, such as getting a firm grasp on correct and effective English sentence structure. We will discuss matters of style in the broad sense (adapting language and tone to the occasion) and deal with concrete examples in a workshop structure. Students should expect a lot of writing, or rather rewriting on the order of at least one written assignment per week. Class attendance will be very important, because when working in groups, one student’s absence seriously inconveniences others.

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ENC 4956

Overseas Studies

Undergraduate Coordinator

Prerequisite: This course must be approved by the Undergraduate Coordinator before the student travels overseas. It may be repeated with a change of topic up to a maximum of 15-credit hours.

This study, which may count towards the English major, involves course work taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

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ENG 3010

Modern Criticism: Form/Subject/Context

Phillip Wegner

This course is designed to introduce you to some of the most important thinkers, movements, issues, debates, and practices in twentieth-century literary and cultural theory. Our goal in studying these works is to become better critical readers, by making our selves more sensitive to the variety of ways in which literary and cultural texts can be said to “mean” anything. Our readings will be clustered into three five-week units, each focusing on set of essays assembled under the broader rubrics of Form, Subject, and Context. In each unit, we will explore a different locus for the production of literary and culture meaning: respectively, the formal structures of the text itself; the location in the world of the author or audience; and finally the larger historical, social, and cultural contexts in which the work appears. Thus, as we move through the readings we will gradually widen our horizons of inquiry; although in the end, I will suggest that a fuller understanding of all kinds of texts can be gained through a recognition of the interrelationship, and indeed the inseparability, of all three perspectives. Along, the way students will become acquainted with such central movements as New Criticism, Russian Formalism, structuralism, semiotics, deconstruction, reader response criticism, psychoanalysis, feminism, gender studies, queer theory, post-colonial theory, Marxist criticism, New Historicism, and cultural materialism. Some of the thinkers whose work we will explore may include W. K. Wimsatt, Monroe C. Beardsley, Cleanth Brooks, Victor Shlovsky, Boris Eichenbaum, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Roland Barthes, Gérard Genette, Algirdas Julien Greimas, Tzvetan Todorov, Louis Marin, Julia Kristeva, Paul de Man, V. N. Volosinov, Jacques Derrida, T. S. Eliot, Stanley Fish, Patrocinio P. Schweickart, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Elaine Showalter, Sandra M. Gilbert, Susan Gubar, Nancy K. Miller, Laura Mulvey, Barbara Smith, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Eve Sedgwick, Michel Foucault, Edward Said, Terry Eagleton, Georg Lukács, Pierre Macherey, Raymond Williams, Kenneth Burke, Janice Radway, Stephen Greenblatt, and Fredric Jameson.

Students will be expected to keep up with all of the readings throughout the semester (and they are extensive and sometimes quite challenging); keep a weekly reading journal; regularly attend class and participate in our discussions; and produce a series of formal course papers.

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ENG 3011

The Major Critics

Richard Brantley

The emphasis is on the history of criticism from Plato to at least the end of the nineteenth century. About twenty essayists will receive close attention; they represent the classical, medieval, Renaissance, neoclassical, Romantic, and Victorian moments. A final unit on Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud will lay the groundwork for Modern and Postmodern theory (which forms the focus in ENG 3010). Directions for both the midterm and the non-cumulative final are as follows: Identify the following fifteen passages, author and title (60 points). Comment on two of them (30 points each). In commenting take class discussion into account and go beyond it.” Twenty typed, double-spaced pages of critical response are required, though not all at the same time. The text is Hazard Adams, ed., Critical Theory Since Plato: Revised Edition.

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ENG 3115

Introduction to Film: Theory & Criticism

Scott Nygren

This course will introduce current theoretical contexts for engaging the contemporary media environment, and will consider the writing of theoretical texts and the making of new films as parallel activities.

We will study world media through close visual analysis of individual films, stressing the historical and international diversity of cinematic approaches and styles. At the same time, we will study contemporary critical writing on film and its basis in the larger domain of cultural theory. Emphasis will be on such basic issues as audience identification, social formations and cultural context as articulated through a series of post-structural, postcolonial and postmodern methodologies. After introducing phenomenology and structuralism as points of departure, the class will consider psychoanalysis, ideology, deconstruction, discourse, gender and race en route to postcolonial and postmodern approaches.

Our principal purpose will be to investigate the conjuncture of theoretical issues with an experience of specific film texts, and the function of these texts in the past and present workings of history, especially as this leads towards questions for future production and study. The working assumption here is that alphabetic writing and film production both constitute modes of inscription, and represent two ways of embodying the same cultural process.

Mastery of so many topics is neither possible nor expected. The goal is to understand the conditions and motives that led to the rethinking of media, and to initiate theoretical strategies in your own work. Two papers of 8-10 pages each plus class discussion are required.

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ENG 3115

Introduction to Film Theory

Roger Beebe

This course will offer a broad introduction to various strategies for interpreting films contextually. While the focus of the course will be largely methods that may be termed “historical,” the meaning of that term is greatly divergent within the various approaches. These approaches will encompass a range of extratextual influences including aesthetic, technological, industrial, and social history. But whatever the specific approach, the course will focus on the importance across these various methodologies of looking at a film as an always contextualized, never simply “textual” artifact.

Readings will span the history of film theory from the early Russian analyses to contemporary scholarship and will include readings from a number of scholarly traditions including genre theory, auteurist criticism, apparatus theory, scholarship on race and gender, postmodern theory, political economy, &c.

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ENG 3122

History of Film 2

Mark A. Reid

This course is the second half of Film History Part II and covers the historical period from the 1960s to the present. Film screenings survey various types of narrative, documentary, avant-garde, and experimental films produced in the US and elsewhere. The course introduces students to recent international films and the major artistic movements that make up this particular history. Lectures and class discussions apply various critical methods to analyze film form, visual style, and narrative content as they relate to particular socio-historical moments and artistic movements. Students will learn and correctly employ film and theoretical terminology in their oral presentations, written and creative work.

Course Goals

Students analyze how various types of films from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia imitate, appropriate, and/or resist dominant representational regimes and popular film genres. Students must employ film terminology, a combination of one or two critical approaches when analyzing and comparing various films and filmmakers. Students should leave this course with a sharpened critical understanding of the many ways to discuss film and the filmmakers who have shaped this history.

Course Requirements and Grading

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ENG 3122

History of Film 2

Maureen Turim

Course Goals: Concentrating on the post-new wave and new Hollywood cinema, this course will in the future be offered as History of the Film 3. We will examine the international history of film from 1970 to the present. The goal is to awaken an understanding of the historical use of film form by exploring changes that have taken place in film industries and technologies Each week we will view a film, examine its form of expression (looking closely at editing, set design, acting styles, dialogue, and narration). This will lead to our discussion of the film’s place in film history, as well as social history. We will look at issues of industry and audience, considering representations of gender, race and political change. Students will learn how to see films with a greater depth of visual understanding. Films to be screened include genres of Hollywood filmmaking, Independents, European, and Japanese films. We will look at directors whose talent shaped the development of cinema; we will also examine the role of actors and actresses, screenwriters, designers and producers in shaping the history of film.

Course Requirements: One paper of 8–10 pages, using historical analysis of film, and short answer exams on readings, lecture material and scenes from films. Participation in class discussion and an oral presentation will also be required.

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ENG 3122

History of Film 2

Robert Ray

This course asks you to use the movies Casablanca and Breathless as memory theaters for storing and recalling (1) the events of the 1930s, especially the consolidation of the Hollywood studio system and the rise of German fascism; and (2) the course of post-War cinematic history, especially American film noir, Italian neorealism, and the French New Wave.

The course covers film history from 1930–1965. After beginning with two movies of German origin, Fritz Lang’s M and MGM’s Grand Hotel, the course’s first half will trace the parallel developments in Hollywood and Europe, using the biography and writing of Walter Benjamin as an allegory of popular culture’s appeal and Naziism’s danger. Part I ends with the Fall of Paris, both the historical event (which drove Benjamin further into a fatal exile) and its Hollywood representation (in Casablanca). Part II traces the two roads that diverge from that moment: the film noir of movies like The Big Sleep and the neorealist rejection of Hollywood Cinema. These two filmmaking practices, apparently so contradictory, converge in the French New Wave, whose most famous movie, Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless, explicitly invokes the image of Humphrey Bogart, the star of Casablanca.

Readings

Assignments and Grading

I. 60% of the final grade will result from two written projects:
– a two-hour mid-term essay exam
– a two-hour final essay exam
II. 40% of the final grade will result from the following:
– class participation (quality as well as quantity)
– brief, short-answer daily reading quizzes
– one oral presentation, which counts as five quiz grades

You are allowed one unexcused absence. Each additional absence will deduct four points from your final course grade.

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ENG 4015

Psychological Approaches to Literature: Lacan’s Poe

Terry Harpold

French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan’s decision to place the text of his 1955 “Seminar on ‘The Purloined Letter’”at the head of his collected essays, Écrits (1966), suggests that Lacan considered his analysis of Poe’s famous short story a signal example of his method. Debate concerning Lacan’s appropriation (misappropriation?) of Poe, initiated by philosopher Jacques Derrida’s 1975 response to the “Seminar,” has generated significant discussions of psychoanalytic concepts of truth and exemplarity, and of the relations of psychoanalysis to literary method.

In this course, we will undertake close readings of Poe’s short story (one of three featuring the fictional detective C. August Dupin), Lacan’s “Seminar,” and several of the most important critical responses to Lacan. We will read Poe’s text and Lacan’s “Seminar” twice: as bookends to the critiques of Lacan (and responses to them); or – in another formulation of this relation – as repetitions or versions of a problematic in psychoanalytic literary theory and method. Parentheses within parentheses.

No prior familiarity with Lacanian psychoanalysis is assumed. Students should have some basic knowledge of Freudian psychoanalysis. Familiarity with contemporary literary and critical theory will be helpful.

Assigned readings for the course will include several short stories, poems and essays by Poe (“The Gold-Bug,” the Dupin trilogy, “The Philosophy of Composition,” “The Raven”); Lacan’s “Seminar;” short texts or excerpts of longer works by Sigmund Freud; and several critical texts oriented by Lacan’s readings of Poe, including Derrida’s essay “The Purveyor of Truth” (his longest sustained critique of Lacan), and short texts by Marie Bonaparte, Bruce Fink, Irene Harvey, and Barbara Johnson. Writing requirements include three take-home essay exams.

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ENG 4110

African Diasporic Cinema: Tracing PostNegritude Visual Culture in the US and Western Europe

Mark A. Reid

This course employs the work of Frantz Fanon, Pierre Bourdieu, Alex Hargreaves, Paul Gilroy, and various American social critics who have discussed the postmodern impulse in literature and films made by western-educated Blacks who reside in North America and Western Europe. In this particular course, we use a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approach to compare and contrast the cinematic depiction of multi-cultural life in highly populated urban regions in the United States and parts of Europe.

The purpose of this course is to analyze how African Diasporic filmmakers as Spike Lee, Julie Dash, Mweze Ngangura, Manthia Diawara and others, use the medium of film to articulate a post-1960s sensibility that at times challenge traditional ways of visually constructing race and gender identity. Class discussions, written assignments and creative projects will examine how recent American, European, and African films dramatize and (de)construct this postNegritude impulse.

Course Goals

Students analyze how various types of films from the Americas, Europe, and Africa imitate, appropriate, and/or resist dominant representational regimes and popular film genres. Students must employ film terminology, a combination of one or two critical approaches when analyzing and comparing various films and filmmakers. Students should leave this course with a sharpened critical understanding of the many ways to discuss the global film industry, the filmmakers, and their films.

Course Requirements and Grading

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ENG 4130

Race in Film

Amy Abugo Ongiri

Course description not available at this time.

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ENG 4133

The Accident: Media, Memory, and Drive in Film and Narrative Theory

Richard Burt

Accidents Happen. Or do they? This course focuses on films involving the accident as serendipity and/or as disaster to meditate on the drives of (cinematic) narrative: mourning, mess, spills, loss, sublimation, trauma, repression, death of spouse or child, (no) going back, (mis)remembering, repetition compulsion, remakes, rewritings, repetition compulsion, sequels, loops, traffic, stopping, (in)attention, randomness, repetition compulsion, contingency, love, creativity, intersections, repression, getting (un)stuck, (not) getting over it, (not) moving on. We’ll see the following films:

Readings by Freud, Lacan, Derrida, Jameson, Huyssens, Barthes, Nora, and Blanchot, among others.

For more information visit: <http://www.clas.ufl.edu/~rburt/4333Accident/>.

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ENG 4133

Introduction to Screenwriting

Mary Robison

This course will introduce students to writing screenplays. Class members will produce twenty pages (half due at mid-term) of a formatted, original script. Class will gather weekly for a three-hour session with the professor, and again weekly, to view a film. Attendance and participation are altogether necessary. There will be various reading assignments made (essays, chapters, script excerpts). And there will be exercises given each week that will require a short, typewritten response. Students will be graded on their script work, on responses to assignments, contributions to discussions, and, generally, on their grasp.

This course is department controlled. For permission to be enrolled, contact professor Mary Robison (maryrobison@aol.com) as soon as possible. Do not wait until registration begins. Be sure to include the course number (ENG 4133) in the subject line of your e-mail.

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ENG 4133

From Berlin to Hollywood: Film Emigration

Barbara Mennel

This course introduces students to the relationship between German cinema of the Weimar Republic and the Hollywood studio system. We will study the films and lives of filmmakers who left Germany to make films in Hollywood. The class emphasizes an analysis of the continuations and breaks from German filmmaking tradition when Germans and Austrians make films in Hollywood. The course will focus on film emigration during the Third Reich and film noir. Filmmakers will include Fritz Lang, Fritz Murnau, Douglas Sirk, Billy Wilder and others.

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ENG 4135

French Cinema

Maureen Turim

This course will examine the history of film in France, tracing the country’s preeminence in silent cinema, the growth of the French film industry, including its problems during two disastrous world wars, the vitality of French cinema of the thirties, the new wave innovations and the present moment. We will look at various movements such as the avant-garde, Poetic-Realism, cinema verité. Our approach to these films will be multifaceted, including close analysis, social historical readings, and critical theoretical work.

We will also concentrate on films set in Paris and its surrounding area, such as Marcel Carné’s Children of Paradise (Les Enfants du paradis), Robert Bresson’s Les Dames de Bois de Boulogne, Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless (A Bout de souffle), Eric Rohmer’s Full Moon In Paris (Les Nuits de la pleine lune), Martine Dugowson’s Mina Tannenbaum and Mathieu Kassowitz’s Hate (la Haine). This subconcentration will prepare students for the possibility of adding a capstone course week in Paris in Spring 2005 to further their investigations on site.

This is an excellent course for students of French, film, history, sociology, art, and cultural studies. If students lack the prerequisites they may see the professor to substitute independent reading of preparatory introductory material.

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ENG 4135

Italian Cinema

Mary Watt

A critical and historical study of Italian film and directors.

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ENG 4136

Film and Video Production

Scott Nygren

This course derives from a double convergence in contemporary media culture. On the one hand, cultural theory and innovative artistic practices regularly overlap and exchange techniques. On the other hand, computers and video have merged so that video imaging and computer interactivity intersect and are reconfiguring the electronic field. Based on these convergences, the class will map the creative and conceptual possibilities of working in new contexts.

The course will not teach traditional documentary, experimental or narrative uses of video as such, but will reinvent these approaches in order to produce visually articulate and engaging video in a contemporary world context.

We will be shooting video on digital video cameras and processing footage with desktop computers, primarily through Final Cut Pro on Mac G4s. The implication of such high-quality but low-cost desktop equipment, for the purposes of this course, is to make current technology available on an individualized basis for innovation and research. Much of the semester will be spent developing strategies for effectively using this equipment, and your participation will form a significant part of the course.

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ENG 4136

Video Production

Roger Beebe

This course is designed as an introduction to a broad range of practices sometimes labeled “experimental video.” The focus of the course will be exclusively on non-narrative approaches to the theory and practice of videomaking. Students will work on a number of short projects throughout the semester (about one every two weeks) that engage simultaneously with different theoretical problems, technological challenges, and aesthetic strategies. The projects will span all of the stages of video production from conception to sound editing as well as a wide variety of aesthetic forms. The course will conclude with a short final project of your own devising that grows out of one or a number of the theories and formal approaches that we have explored during the semester.

No previous experience with video production is required (or even expected) – what is necessary is a willingness to throw out all preconceptions and submit to the experimental nature of the course. Interested students should contact the instructor via email at <rogerbb@english.ufl.edu> as early as possible (at least a week before the beginning of advance registration if possible), because seats are very limited.

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ENG 4905

Independent Study

Faculty Member of Choice

An Independent Study course may be taken for 1- to 3-credit hours and will count as credit toward the English major. This course may be repeated with a change of topic up to a maximum of 9 credits.

This course is for advanced students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The student must find a faculty member who is willing to supervise the semester-long study, and together, the two create a project. The student must meet with the professor at designated times, agreed upon in advance, and complete all assignments in a timely manner.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Conquest, Slavery, and Revolution

Leah Rosenberg

2004 is the bicentennial of the Haitian Revolution, a date that marks the establishment of the first black republic and the one successful slave rebellion in the new world. The forthcoming bicentennial points to the great similarities and differences between the Caribbean and the United States. The history of the Caribbean, like that of the United States, is a story of conquest, slavery, and revolution. Like many writers in the United States from Harriet Beecher Stowe to Toni Morrison, Caribbean writers have been haunted by a history that is as elusive as it is omnipresent. Like some of their U.S. counterparts, Caribbean writers sought to write not only the story of European conquerors and slave owners, but also the stories of the people who were conquered and enslaved. In so doing, Caribbean and U.S. writers alike have confronted the challenge of writing about people who left few written records and whose lives have often been neglected by historians or portrayed from the perspective of their antagonists, slave owners and colonists. Thus, for example, in the 1770s, Edward Long a prominent British historian and planter argued that Afro-Caribbeans were not human. A century later James Anthony Froude famously claimed of the Caribbean that there are no people there in the true sense of the word, with a character and purpose of their own. We examine the strategies Caribbean and U.S writers have used to create art from these absences and denials through an analysis of literary and historical writing. Authors will likely include: Bryan Edwards, Edward Long, James Anthony Froude, Hannah Craft, Frances Harper, Earl Lovelace, Kamau Brathwaite, Louise Erdrich, and Michel Trouillot.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Hilda Doolittle and Modernist Culture

Marsha Bryant

This course examines a major figure of early modernism, the American expatriate poet H.D. (Hilda Doolittle). Because of her involvement with avant-garde movements, an in-depth look at H.D.’s career allows us to assess a variety of modernist literary and visual experiments. With Ezra Pound and Richard Aldington she founded the Imagist movement, which sought to break free from traditional poetic form. H.D. was also involved in the Close-Up cinema group, which produced the film Borderline (starring Paul Robeson), and founded the first English-language film journal. In Man Ray’s photographs, H.D. seems to embody the modern bohemian woman. Her travels in Greece and Egypt, where she witnessed the Tutankhamen excavations, place some of her work at the center of literary, archaeological, and anthropological debates about the origins of Western culture. She was also interested in emergent psychoanalytic theories, influenced not only by her reading but also her analysis with Freud. We will read H.D.’s poems, her memoir on Freud, a short story based on her travel in Egypt, and her novel The Gift (which has been republished recently by our University Press). We will also study some of her film work. Assignments will include 2 papers, an essay exam, a presentation, and a creative assignment.

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ENG 4936

Sylvia Plath’s Legacy

Stephanie Smith

Sylvia Plath had a relatively short career, when she was alive. Indeed, she herself died before the impact of her writing on any audience, other than a small one, was apparent. Yet, since her untimely suicide, Plath has become an American icon of sorts, not only because of her memoir/novel, The Bell Jar, and her collections of poetry, but also because she did commit suicide, at such a young age, and at an historical moment that would prove to be one that would fuel a public frenzy over this young, American poet that would eventuate in a Hollywood movie, among other things.

This honors seminar will examine Plath, and her legacy, in depth. We will re-examine her writing from both critical and historical perspectives, and examine how and why this poet has left such an astounding legacy to us today.

Required Reading will include:

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ENG 4940

Internship

Undergraduate Coordinator

The English Department at the University of Florida offers three* credit hours of internship to its majors who provide the following to the Undergraduate Coordinator for approval:

Once the Undergraduate Coordinator has approved the internship requested by the student, the department will register the student for the internship credits.

Upon completion of the internship:

*For two credit hours, the student would need to work 8 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 16 hours per week for Summer A or B.

*For one credit hour, the student would need to work 4 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 8 hours per week for Summer A or B.

Please note the following limitations on the English Internship:

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ENG 4970

Honors Thesis Project

Faculty members (2) of Choice

Students must have have completed at least one semester of ENG 4936, Honors Seminar. Open to English Honors students.

The student must select two faculty members: one to direct the reading, research, and writing of a thesis on a topic of the student’s and director’s chosing, and another as the second reader. An abstract (100 to 200 words) and one copy of the thesis (30 to 50 pages) must be delivered to the CLAS Academic Advising Center on Fletcher Road at least 10 days before graduation.

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ENL 3112

English Novel: Eighteenth Century

Mel New

We will be reading works of fiction written between 1720 and 1820, the beginnings of the English novel tradition. Authors definitely included are Defoe, Fielding, Richardson, Sterne, and Austen. This is a heavy reading course, useful and informative for those who are interested in the development of the novel from its beginnings to the great novelists of the 19th and 20th centuries (there are none, as yet, in the 21st century), but not a course for those English majors who do not like to read. There will be daily quizzes and take-home examinations. The fundamental theoretical framework of the course argues that students should read a great deal of good literature before being introduced to a plethora of bad criticism and worse theory. The course is, therefore, a theory-free zone – which is, of course, a theory worth contemplating.

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ENL 3132

English Novel: Twentieth Century

Brandon Kershner

Course description not available at this time.

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ENL 3154

British Poetry: Twentieth Century: Voices of Dissent

Julian Wolfreys

This course will examine a range of 20th century British poetry, looking at a number of different voices, while also addressing, as a constant focus five major British poets of the twentieth century: W. H. Auden, Thom Gunn, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Selima Hill and Tony Harrison. Each will be considered for the ways in which they appropriate modes of address, poetic models, and traditional forms to offer voices of dissent and challenge to poetic and cultural orthodoxy. At the same time, less well-known poets will be considered alongside the principal five writers, in order to raise questions of cultural, national, ethnic, and sexual identity, as well as to look at the ways in which, in the twentieth century, poets receive and transform traditional themes and interests in the canon of British poetic matter.

Texts:

An anthology of poetry in photocopy packet will be available.

Assessment: Three essays; in-class participation

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ENL 3210

Medieval English Literature

James Paxson

Medieval English Literature is a general introduction to the thought and culture of the Middle English period (c. 1100–1500 C. E.). It will thus serve mainly as a resource or backgrounds course designed to prepare students for Chaucer as well as for Renaissance authors. We’ll thus devote much attention to the influence of classical culture on the medieval imagination. We will study key genres including epic, romance, allegory, the philosophical debate, and the travel narrative not only to appreciate their literary or aesthetic dimensions but also to take into account medieval systems of psychology, ethics, history, theology, rhetoric, poetics, and semiotics; issues of gender and sexuality will figure prominently. We will have occasion as well to investigate some biblical texts and religious thinking important to our area. You should thereby develop knowledge in the various critical, literary, or cultural theories that have come to shape contemporary medieval studies in particular and English studies in general. The eight texts on the syllabus divide symmetrically (four Latin, four English) in order to establish the course’s sense of generic, aesthetic, and historical backgrounds and legacies. Two papers; midterm exam on classical backgrounds; quizzes; required attendance.

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ENL 3241

The British Romantics

Richard Brantley

The emphasis is on such major poets as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, and Byron. The approach is historical, interdisciplinary, biographical, and formalistic. Directions for both the midterm and the non-cumulative final are as follows: Identify the following fifteen passages, author and title (60 points). Comment on two of them (30 points each). In commenting take class discussion into account and go beyond it.” Twenty typed, double-spaced pages of critical response are required, though not all at the same time. The text is David Perkins, ed., English Romantic Writers.

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ENL 3251

Victorian Literature

Ariel Gunn

This course will introduce students to Victorian literature and the cultural anxieties, interests, and obsessions that shape it. We will familiarize ourselves with some of the cultural conversations occurring in Victorian Britain, particularly those about class and gender. Channeling these conversations through the fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction of the era, the class will engage these issues through in-class discussions and weekly responses. To better understand the workings of Victorian society, we will consider how cultural phenomena like the Industrial Revolution, the Reform Bill(s), and the Woman Question impact the Victorian’s conception of class and gender.

The goals of this class include familiarizing ourselves with Victorian texts, learning how to read these texts critically, and constructing essays that are thoughtful, meaningful, and convincing. In addition to weekly responses, assignments will also include two major papers, two exams, and an in-class presentation.

A tentative reading list and schedule will be available at the end of July at <http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/agunn/teaching/>.

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ENL 4220

Poetry, Government & Sexuality in the Sixteenth Century

John Murchek

In the sixteenth century, a dispute erupted about the conduciveness of poetry to “government” – a term which contemporaries understood to refer not only to governmental institutions (the monarchy, parliament, the justice system), but to a principle of conduct, an ideal of ethical self-regulation, and a tactics for directing the actions of others. In his 1579 attack on poetry and the theatre titled The School of Abuse, Stephen Gosson laments that the depraved Roman Emperor Nero was “drawen to vanitie by wanton poets, [rather] than to good government by the counsel of grave senators.” And, rehearsing one of the standard charges of sixteenth-century anti-poetry tracts, Gosson declares that Plato banished poets from the Republic “as effeminate writers, unprofitable members, and utter enemies to vertue.” According to Gosson, then, poets, whom he considers inevitably “wanton” and “effeminate,” can only lead readers away from the “good government” to which they should aspire. Intriguingly enough, Sir Philip Sidney, who responds to such charges in his Defence of Poetry, also believes that good government should be a person’s goal, but he argues that poetry can promote it. The reader of Virgil’s Aeneid can discover how Aeneas “governeth himself . . . how in his inward self, and how in his outward government,” and by being moved to imitate Aeneas, learn to govern his own behavior more thoroughly.

In this course, we will take this dispute as the starting point for an examination of the ways in which sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century poetry and literary criticism conceptualize poetry’s relation to “government,” and we will do so in order to understand the role that the “unprecedented poetic productivity” (David Norbrook) of English writers in the century after the accession of Henry VIII played in laying the groundwork for the emergence of the modern experience of “sexuality.” Michel Foucault’s arguments regarding governmentality, practices of the self, and sexuality will provide the framework within which we will undertake this examination. We will use his categories of analysis to structure our readings of texts, and assignments will require that you employ those categories when you write about sixteenth-century texts. We will also read materials drawn from early modern social history.

Given the topic of this course, I imagine it will be of particular interest to students pursuing one of the following English Department Undergraduate Models of Study: British Literature, Cultural Studies, Studies in Theory, and Feminisms, Genders, and Sexualities.

At the moment, I imagine that students will be evaluated on the basis of attendance and participation, a test in the first half of the semester, one brief essay (4–6pp), a major essay (approx. 10pp), and a final examination.

Texts will likely include those listed below, but I would not advise you to order any of the sixteenth-century volumes prior to the beginning of the fall semester, as I will be exploring various electronic options in the coming months:

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ENL 4273

Twentieth Century British Literature: Literature, Culture, and the “Americanization of the World”

Phillip Wegner

Shortly after the beginning of the twentieth century, the English social theorist, W.T. Stead, asserted that the fundamental “trend” of the new century would be the “Americanization of the world.” In this declaration, Stead signaled an increasing anxiety on the part of the then dominant imperial nation-state concerning the challenge to its position represented by its one-time colony. The concern over the “Americanization of the world,” and in particular of Great Britain itself, would shape British literary and cultural production throughout the century, taking on a new significance in the years following the Second World War when the United States finally displaces Great Britain as the center of global capitalism. All of this then prefigures in some fascinating ways debates raging in our moment over “globalization,” and so an understanding of these historical issues will provide us with a greater insight into developments that will shape our lives for many years to come. In this course, we will explore representations of the United States and the processes of what Stead calls Americanization as they are manifest in some of the most important literary and cultural works of the century. We will begin our discussion at the very horizon of the twentieth century with a close reading of Joseph Conrad’s monumental trilogy of modernization – Heart of Darkness (1899), Lord Jim (1900), and Nostromo (1904) – with a particular eye to the way these works help bring into focus the transition into a truly global economic and political order then already well underway. We will next turn our attention to a number of key works from the middle of the century that narrate both the decline of British “formal” imperialism and the rise of the United States as a new economic, political, and cultural power. We will also look at the ways these literary texts explore the development of new kinds of youth cultures and the ways they remake British society as a whole. Finally, we will focus on how these debates continue to influence the literature and cultural theory of Great Britain in the present moment. Although the final reading list has yet to be determined, we will more than likely discuss a number of the following:

Students will be expected to keep up with all of the readings throughout the semester; put together a weekly reading journal; regularly attend class and participate in our discussions; and produce three formal course papers evaluating the work of each author in relationship to the issues discussed in class.

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ENL 4311

Chaucer

R. Allen Shoaf

Aims of the Course

The course seeks to familiarize students with the major poetry of Chaucer in its historical context (primarily, though not exclusively, Troilus and Criseyde and The Canterbury Tales) and to introduce them to the principal methodological issues at stake in the modern study of Chaucer – especially the question of sources, the problem of “translation,” the nature of allusion, the representation of the body, and the status of metaphoric discourse in late medieval poetry.

Attention will also be paid to Middle English as a language, and some effort will be devoted to “performing” Chaucer aloud. (Tapes of Chaucer’s poetry read by professional Chaucerians can be ordered from a non-profit organization; details will be offered in class.) The course is not, however, a course in language as such.

Texts

Reserve List

There will be a list of around 25 titles. Students may want to provide their own copies (any edition) of Vergil’s Aeneid, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, The Romance of the Rose, and Dante’s Inferno since limited selections will be assigned from these works.

Requirements

Spot quizzes (unannounced except for the notice on the syllabus); one modernization quiz (30 minutes); two in-class exams (2 hours each); one paper, 5 pages in length; no final exam; mandatory attendance – the first three (3) absences will be excused, but each absence after three, unless excused for extraordinary reasons, reduces your final mark by 10% (NB: one two-period class counts as two classes).

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare

Ira Clark

Ira Clark’s advanced Shakespeare course will cover 13 or 14 plays. It will open with a pair of plays to help students become accustomed to reading highly rhetorical and poetic texts and to envisioning performances from a dramatic text. We will proceed with a cluster of plays that illustrate Shakespeare’s dramatic and stylistic development; likely these will track the Roman plays or a series of comedies. We will read at least one cluster of histories, one of comedies, and one of tragedies. All along we will concentrate on helpful ways to read Shakespeare’s plays: for examples, as representations of Shakespeare’s era, as means of raising problems about our own era, as ways of considering other eras and cultures. And we will focus on the questions and debates Shakespeare’s plays have stimulated over theological, political, economic, social, psychological, gender, and other issues.

Grades will be based on a combination of 11 pop tests and 500-word reaction papers, dropping the lowest grade (30% of the grade), a 3000-word paper due at the middle of the term (30% of the grade) and a 5000-word paper due at the end of the term (40% of the grade). Both paper topics must be agreed upon in advance by the student and teacher.

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LIN 3680

Modern English Structure

Roger M. Thompson

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 3003

Forms of Narrative

Donald Ault

Required texts:

On Reserve: numerous essays and comics

This experimental course will focus on the transformation of plots and characters from one medium to another.

Note: Some texts studied in this course may vary from those given in this description.

Disney animated cartoon characters:

E. C. Segar’s Popeye comic strip character: which was translated into animated cartoons by the Fleischer brothers and a feature film by Robert Altman

Dashiell Hammett’s Maltese Falcon: which exists in novel form, several movie versions, and a photo-film book

Siegel and Schuster’s Superman and Bob Kane’s and Batman comic book characters: beings who have had numerous incarnations in comic strips, animated cartoons, movie serials, television series, and feature films

For each class meeting you should read the essays and the visual material (comics) carefully several times in order to be able to discuss them knowledgeably. You will be required to submit take-home writing assignments, which will involve both critical and creative experiments. There will also be frequent short in-class quizzes over the readings. Since I am no longer permitted to put in-class screening segments on reserve, you need to attend screenings and discussions of them in order to do the assignments and pass in-class quizzes. You may also submit an optional final paper to substitute for or augment the specific assignments if there is something of particular interest to you that is (or is not) covered in the course.

Your final grade will be based primarily on these exercises, quizzes, and projects. A significant amount of class time will be taken up with screenings, and I expect you to assume considerable responsibility for making this course work for you. Because I plan to conduct the class as much as possible as a discussion rather than a lecture, productive class participation can make a significant difference in your final grade.

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LIT 3031

Studies in Poetry

Joanna Shearer

Poetry is an art of both sound and vision. It is meant to be both seen and heard. Therefore, the purpose of this course is not only to study poetry in general, but also to study how poetry “works” on the human intellect and imagination – and, in turn, how the art of poetry itself is able to transform as well as to be transformed by the inevitable changes that occur in every human culture over time. This course will not merely study the structure, language, meter, and form of poetry from different ages simply for their own sake, but rather we will also look at how certain authors and their works “fit” (or not) into the dominant norms and ideologies of their times. In doing so, we will examine the rhetorical arguments surrounding the art of poetry itself while analyzing how various authors and their works succeed and/or fail to live up to the expectations of critics – even if those critics happen to be fellow poets themselves. From Plato and Aristotle, to Sidney and Eliot, the debate over how to categorize, define, and compose in this medium has never wavered in its intensity, and now it is our turn to enter into this heated debate and decide, in the end, just how poetry will “work” for us.

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LIT 3041

Studies in Drama: Citizen Comedy and Domestic Tragedy in the Age of Shakespeare

Robert Thomson

A study of a group of plays unified by being set in the contemporary London and environs of their authors in the late sixteenth century or the opening decades of the seventeenth century. The main focus will be upon the texts and their social, political, historical and cultural contexts.

It has been suggested that City Comedy (however we define it) moved to the center of the Elizabethan Stage when Londoners started to reflect upon their new social roles and their urban setting. Social mobility with its attendant pretensions, hypocrisy, greed, pathos etc, arose in the midst of the new middle class society of trade and commerce and gave substance to these plays, as did the threatened state of an increasingly impoverished and newly dependent gentry.

The plays to be studied will be:

Two essays will be set (ca. 2000 words) and in addition there will be a number of in-class tests and oral reports There will be no final exam.

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LIT 3041

Theories of Comedy and English Comedies

Ira Clark

Theories of Comedy and English Comedies looks at why we think of certain plays as comic by setting up some of the best-known theories and criticism of comedy to frame discussions and readings of some of the best English comedies from all eras. In turn we will use the comedies to test the helpfulness of the theories. That is, we will be considering the supposed motives and motifs of comedies, the supposed origins and techniques of comedies, some of the subgenres of comedies, and the multiple and sometimes conflicted effects of comedies in order to ask how they entertain us, what they represent, what they tell us, and so on.

We will begin the course with a brief overview of criticism based on a collection of readings. Then we will alternate theoretical and critical frames with the comedies they purport to explain. We will conclude by reading a series of comedies with all of these hypotheses and applications in mind as we attempt to compare and contrast the theories’ helpfulness to understanding how the comedies work. We will cover the equivalent of a major critical piece or a comedy each week of the course.

Grades will be based on a combination of weekly pop tests, 500-word reaction papers, and 750-word take-home essays, dropping the two lowest grades (50% of the grade), and a 5000-word paper on a topic agreed to in advance by the student and teacher that comes due at the end of the term (50% of the grade).

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LIT 3043

Studies in Modern Drama: Texts Against Performance

Apollo Amoko

This course addresses the centrality of performance to the aesthetics of drama. Specifically, we will examine the implications of studying dramatic plays in contexts that do not typically take account of performance. Most of us are unlikely to watch performances of the vast majority of the plays we study. Our comments regarding performance, if at all existent, tend therefore to be conjectural and hypothetical. The course will revolve around two antithetical arguments. The first argument insists on the singularity and irreducibility of performance for the dramatic aesthetic. At its most extreme, this view suggests that all readings of plays that do not derive from the experience of performance are necessarily incomplete and inadequate. The second argument suggests, counter-intuitively perhaps, that the experience of performance, beyond being unnecessary, may actually inhibit our capacity to read dramatic texts. According to this argument, the charismatic body of the actor and the emotive power of live performance interrupt and distort critical textual engagement. As well, the inexorable unfolding of dramatic performances in ‘real time’ prevents close reading, re-reading, cross-referencing and so on all of which are indispensable for informed criticism. Which are these two positions is right? Are texts and performances as mutually opposed to each other as the two arguments imply? This course will be based in large part on the Gainesville Theatre season for 2004.

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LIT 3362

Age of the Avant-Garde

Greg Ulmer

The term avant-garde or vanguard originally was a military term. It was used in the 19th century to refer to radical political movements, and then to art movements that challenged conventional styles and tastes. Rather than covering the history of vanguardism, we will attempt to recreate for ourselves the experience of radical innovation that is the defining quality of the age of the avant-garde. This age includes the paradigm shift that occurred in almost every institution of knowledge in the 20th century, including natural sciences, social sciences, philosophy, and arts. Although the avant-garde is now considered to be an historical rather than a current phenomenon, our course is based on the premise that the strategies of creativity manifested in the arts movements may be generalized into methods of learning. The new medium of our time that could benefit from vanguard creativity is the Internet (World Wide Web).

Semester Project

Using a networked classroom (the NWE), all the work of the semester contributes to the completion of one overall online project. In order to understand why the avant-garde was so disturbing to so many people, we need to apply the vanguard revolution to an area of representation left untouched by the transformation of style and form that affected all the arts (and sciences) of the 20th century. One such area is the academic research paper in particular, and pedagogy in general. The virtue of this choice is that we all have some experience of the conventions and traditions of the academic essay. There is something at stake when we tamper with these forms. We will do for the research paper and its “realism” what the avant-garde did for the literary and fine arts. One motivation for this approach to the vanguard is the rapid emergence of the home computer and the internet as central features of American culture. In this context the Website constitutes an extension of education into a new public sphere – cyberspace – in which the very categories of logic and identity are being re-configured at all levels. Our goal is to revolutionize the academic learning process, to bring “study” up to speed with new media.

Caveat: while our course applies vanguard methods to academic learning, the course itself remains conventional and rear-guard to the extent that it retains all the features of assignments and grades (sorry). The learning experiment is performed in 2 parts (2 Websites) – the creation of a manifesto, followed by a writing/design experiment testing the new poetics. In addition, students are assigned to a band responsible for 2 in-class presentations, and for email discussion.

Some possible readings may include:

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LIT 3383

Women’s Poetry and Twentieth Century Culture

Marsha Bryant

The very term “woman poet” continues to be both necessary and problematic as we enter a new century. On the one hand, it marks a necessary emergence from the nineteenth-century idea of the “poetess,” which confined women’s poetry to the realms of sentimental verse and domesticity. On the other hand, it has fostered a problematic model of competing literary traditions in which gender attaches only the feminine side; thus “women’s poetry” becomes a marginal supplement to poetic tradition. Grounded in this vexed history, the course seeks to move discussions of women’s poetry beyond the impasse of canonical hierarchies by framing it within a larger cultural matrix – one which includes literary genres, modernism, archaeology, advertising, popular magazines, and performance. Women are positioned differently in culture than men, so feminist frameworks will remain crucial for our discussions. Yet women’s poetry replicates as well as revises culture; it does not always counter dominant forms. We will devote much class time to discussing individual poems, placing them in the contexts of the poet’s career and the larger culture she inhabits. We will also assess the powers and limits of the “women’s poetry” label. Written work will include 2 papers, a presentation, a parody, and an essay exam.

Texts:

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LIT 3383

Women in Literature

Tace Hedrick

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 4194

African Literature in English: Fictions of Africa

Apollo Amoko

This course explores the idea of Africa articulated in the founding texts of modern African literature. What is the historical, political, social and cultural basis of this idea of Africa? Modern African literature first emerged as a discourse designed to liberate African subjects from colonialism. What ideas regarding African subjectivity on the one hand and the role of literature in political struggle on the other hand did the colonial context impose on African literature? What “Africanized” notions of race, ethnicity, nationality, gender and sexuality did these texts propound? How did these notions relate to each other? In short, we will trace how a politics of identity was translated into a theory and practice of art. To what extent is the idea of Africa propounded by the founding fictions representative of the politics of everyday life in the vast and varied continent? Is any literature ever representative of the context that ostensibly produced it? To what extent does the idea of Africa affirmed by African writers depend on, even as it purports to refute, the colonial idea of Africa? In what ways, if any, is African literature different from the literatures of other continents? Does it make sense to classify literature according to the racial, continental, ethnic, national, gender, sexual and other identities of either authors or readers? We will attempt to answer these questions by looking at a range of canonical African fiction.

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LIT 4320

An Introduction to Folklore

Robert Thomson

This is in every sense an introductory course; I assume no knowledge on your part of either the materials or the study of folklore though of course many of you will have at least an inkling of what is intended here. By the term “folklore” I mean, firstly, the materials that are subsumed within the many diverse activities of folklore performance including narratives in the form of epics, ballads, folksongs, folktales, legends, myths and folk dramas as well as usages of idiosyncratic verbal play such as riddles, rhymes, proverbs, charms and other verbal utterances associated with superstitious practices and beliefs. All of these forms, by their usage within a folk group, impose a distinctive character upon that group. They may function as both a reflection and constant reinforcement of the manners and mores of a group. However, because it is essentially an unwritten culture, folklore is constantly adaptable to change even though it may, paradoxically, resist alteration.

The term “folklore” also has a second usage; it encompasses the discipline of the study of folklore materials. And so our course will attempt to cover both an introduction to the materials of folklore and also a wide ranging though necessarily brief examination of the many and various methodologies and theoretical approaches which have arisen to explain the origins, nature, forms and meanings of folklore genres.

In the broadest terms, the syllabus may be divided into four (unequal) sections:

A dated schedule of topics is attached and a more specific list of secondary readings as well as a guide to the collection of materials will be made available at the beginning of classes.

The following texts are required for this course and may be found at Goering’s Bookstore at 1717 NW 1st Avenue (books & bagels)

There will be three in-class exams based upon readings and class discussions. In addition you will be required, as your major requirement for this class to complete a collection project and present it, together with an analysis, at the end of the course. The collection project will be broken into two sections; the collected data will be required during the first week of November and the completed assignment, which will involve a detailed ‘ethnographic’ description of the social contexts and an analysis of the cultural function/s of your entire collection will be due on the last day of classes. If time permits, oral presentations of your fieldwork results may also be required. Full details and extended discussions will occur throughout the course in relation to the collections you undertake.

Your final grade will depend largely upon the fieldwork project as you might expect. The components of the course will compute in approximately this fashion; 10% for each test; 25% for presentation of data collected (Nov. 5th.); 40% final project (i.e. classification & analysis of collection) leaving 5% for any other significant contributions I may take into account on a discretionary basis. Attendance at all classes is expected. Absences will affect final grades. In addition, any instructor of a course devoted to oral communication would be remiss if they did not positively acknowledge or in some way, shape, or form reward the oral contributions of class members.

My office hours in Turlington Hall, Room 4342, will be from 8am to 9am each day of classes. In addition you may make an appointment – phone 392-1060, extension 267; email: <rthomson@english.ufl.edu>.

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LIT 4333

Literature for the Adolescent: Haunted by Stories

Catherine Tosenberger

This course will be an exploration of literature for adolescents, with a special emphasis upon those stories that are commentaries and/or interpretations of other literary and/or cultural narratives, particularly narratives of gender and sexuality. Since a great many folktales and myths concern themselves with the hero’s or heroine’s coming to sexual maturity (how many fairy tales end in marriage?), adolescent texts that invoke or retell such narratives will be especially highlighted. In addition to novels and short stories, we will examine scholarship from a variety of disciplines, including children’s literature, psychology, folklore, film studies, and queer theory, among others; as we will be discussing not only what constitutes “adolescent literature,” but what constitutes “adolescence” itself, and this interdisciplinary approach will give us a variety of definitions and narratives to consider.

The requirements for this course are as follows: five weekly reading responses, one oral presentation and a paper based upon that presentation, and a final project of at least 2000 words. Participation in class discussions will also form a major part of your grade.

Possible readings may include:

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LIT 4334

The Golden Age of Children’s Literature

Kenneth Kidd

This course is a literary, historical, and cultural exploration of the first so-called “Golden Age” of children’s literature in Britain and the United States, which runs from about the mid-1800s to the early twentieth century. We’ll take this group of books seriously, even as we question the very conceit of a golden age. To write for children during this period was neither an exclusive nor a problematic calling; many of the authors we’ll meet wrote for children and adults alike, and would probably have found puzzling contemporary disdain for “kiddie lit.” We’ll consider the stratification of these books, some of which are known for their innovation, others for their affirmation of tradition. With the help of Rita Smith, Curator of our very own Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature, we’ll look at some of the important periodicals for which many authors wrote, foremost among them St. Nicholas, edited by Mary Mapes Dodge. Our scholarly resources will include Gillian Avery’s Behold the Child (researched in the Baldwin), Jerry Griswold’s Audacious Kids, Juliet Dusinberre’s Alice to the Lighthouse, and Beverly Lyon Clark’s Kiddie Lit, which explores the historical segregation of “adult” and “children’s” literature.

Tentative Books:

The course will be conducted as a seminar, so participation is vital. Students will write short weekly response papers as well as 2–3 longer essays. There will be no exams.

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LIT 4930

Studies in Children’s Culture: Children’s Film

John Cech

This course will explore the history, genres, and cultural contexts of fims created for children – from magic lantern shows and early silent movie fantasies and “Actualities” to the highly sophisticated technologies of contemporary digitized animation. One particular area of concentration will be the movies, cartoons, and animated films of the 1930s, whichbecame the creative crucible for many of the film forms for young people that are so familiar to us today. Each class meeting will involve the screening of one or more films. The requirements for the course include a series of short “reviews,” as well as a final project and final exam.

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LIT 4930

Representing Jews in Victorian Literature and Culture

Judith W. Page

The most famous Jew in Victorian England, Benjamin Disraeli, did not actually practice Judaism, since he was baptized at the age of twelve. And yet, Disraeli could not escape his Jewishness. Although Disraeli will not be the main focus of this course, ideas of Jewishness, representation, and British nationality will provide a common thread. We will explore the ways in which Jewish and non-Jewish writers negotiate the slippery terrain of Jewish and national identity. We will also read a variety of texts closely and carefully, attending to formal questions, modes of representation, and cultural significance.

In addition to the following texts, students will read selections from contemporary theorists, historians, and critics. We will also view a production of The Merchant of Venice (set in late Victorian costume) and the musical adaptation of Oliver Twist, Oliver! Please note that The Merchant of Venice is included in this reading list as kind of ur-text for everything that follows. Students who take this course must be committed to reading several hundred pages a week, usually in the form of long novels. Assignments will probably include reading quizzes and several exams, both take-home and in-class.

The reading list, subject to some alteration, will likely include the following:

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LIT 4930

The Philosophy of Literature

James Haskins

This course begins with an introduction to the concept of philosophical thinking and its relationship to literature. It then comprises reading and discussion of how each depends on the other, the efforts of the human mind to place itself within the universe and to communicate those efforts via literature, and ways of philosophically and critically analyzing various kinds of external reality and literature devoted to these kinds of reality.

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LIT 4930

Nobel and Pulitzer Prize Winning Books

James Haskins

Designed primarily for upper-level English and Education majors, the course begins with an overview of the history of the Nobel and Pulitzer Prizes and the mechanisms by which winners are chosen each year. It then comprises reading and discussion of the winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature and the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, 1993–2003, exploring relationships among winners past and present in theme, structure, and criticism.

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SPC 3605

Speechwriting

Ronald Carpenter

Speechwriting is an advanced composition course. In SPC 3605, students acquire stylistic prowess by which their sentences have increased potential for memorability and quotability, ease and accuracy of comprehension, as well as overall persuasiveness. The course is called Speechwriting because models of eloquence to be imitated are in sentences of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, John Kennedy, and Martin Luther King, Jr., for examples. Although you practice these stylistic skills while writing speeches, the acquired prowess is applicable in virtually any future communication endeavors, as speakers or writers, regardless of profession.

SPC 3605 is not about supporting arguments or organizing them into broader discourse. If you seek those skills, other courses are more appropriate. Speechwriting is about how to select the best words and arrange them in their best orders – within sentences – to achieve optimal impress of your ideas upon readers or listeners. These stylistic skills are practiced and perfected in drafts that you aloud among peers (and for me) during our “lab” periods, wherein you should acquire a refined sense of how to achieve the final product desired at the semester end. Thus, present drafts when due; listen carefully to other students’ drafts, comparing yours with theirs; participate in rewriting others’ sentences; and heed my commentary about all drafts. Do not assume that “participation” means simply presenting your drafts and listening only to commentary about them.

How a draft is presented, vocally and physically, has no bearing on your grade (for help with delivery skills other courses are appropriate; I may make suggestions about how to improve your platform presence, however). The important point is that Speechwriting is an advanced composition course, wherein you read drafts aloud as bases of discussion by which all students understand how and why some sentences are better than others. For initial and final drafts, I require word processing available in computer labs on campus (if you do not have your own computer). Revision on your disk is easier; spelling is accurate; and word lengths of drafts are known.

From past experience, I know that reasonably diligent students achieve a substantial measure of the stylistic skills taught in this course. Final grades are higher, however, as you (1) demonstrate refined prowess as the competent stylist on exams and in final drafts, (2) understand course precepts derived from readings and lecture materials, as tested by three exams during the semester (the course has no final exam), and (3) produce a final research paper about style as defined in this course (research paper options will be explained during a lecture relatively early in the semester and will require additional library reading). Final grades are determined one-half by the average of your three exam scores and one-half by the quality of your final notebook with polished drafts of speeches and the research paper – all typed, double-spaced, and turned in during exam week at the time and date listed in the University Timetable as the course final exam period. The textbook for the course is Ronald H. Carpenter, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works; it can be purchased at Goerings Book Store at Bageland.

Although this is a writing course, I also am impressed – for grading purposes – by how much you know about style as defined in this class. Please appreciate the fact that this composition course is unlike virtually all other persuasive writing courses at the University of Florida, for the expertise and confidence in the precepts being taught are derived from your instructor’s own published research in four scholarly press books, several book chapters, and numerous research journal articles (all of which informed my writing of your textbook). Furthermore, from my experience as a communications consultant for organizations outside the university (such as corporate executives, lawyers, civic leaders, hospital administrators, public relations professionals, and officers attending the U.S. Naval War College), I know that skills taught in this course are useful in the “real” world.

In conclusion, teaching you to be eloquent stylists gives me great personal satisfaction. For I can make positive changes in your behaviors as communicators. If you join me in this endeavor, which admittedly entails some substantial effort on your part, I promise you will acquire valuable skills that will be admired by others as well as be useful for the rest of your life, no matter what your later profession might be. The only prerequisite for the course is that you can write grammatical sentences that are punctuated correctly.

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SPC 4680

Rhetorical Criticism: Masterpieces of Rhetoric

Ronald Carpenter

Rhetorical Criticism has as its focus several “masterpieces of rhetoric.” Although several of these are in the realm of political and presidential discourse, another focus this semester will be upon rhetorical efforts to persuade Americans to engage in armed conflict with other nations. Thus, students will examine how some speakers, writers, and film makers appealed successfully to specific attitudes and actions with profound influence upon the course of events. The primary goal of the course is to provide students will a refined sense of some rhetorical principles and techniques by which their own future discourse is more effective persuasively. Please note: “rhetoric” is not a pejorative word. In its current and inaccurate usage, the word often is prefaced with the adjective “empty” to disparage what “other” people say or write ostensibly as groundless emotional appeal in contradistinction to discourse that presumably only “tells it like it is.” But accurately, “rhetoric” refers to those means by which discourse “adjusts ideas to people and people to ideas.” So rhetoric is the art of persuasion, and rhetorical criticism identifies and assesses what was done with words (and other factors) to achieve persuasion.

Students will write five short papers (2–3 typed pages), four of which will summarize and expand briefly upon assigned readings, films, or group projects (the fifth paper is the enthymemic persuasion of me, an assignment that will be described in week six). I will accept these papers co-signed by all group members that participated. A longer final paper (8–10 typed pages) will report research about some topic suggested by the course (the focus of that paper must be developed in consultation with me). The course will have four very short quizzes during the semester as well as a “take home” final exam. Please understand that your group projects will require meetings with your student peers outside regular class periods. Students also are required to view some films outside of class. The textbook is Halford Ryan, Contemporary American Public Discourse: A Collection of Speeches and Critical Essays. It is available at Goerings Book Store, next to Bageland.

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