Undergraduate Courses, Spring 2004

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Upper Division (3000–4000) Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

AML 3031

American Literature I: Contact to 1865

David Leverenz

This course will begin with short stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan Poe (you may be wearing a large scarlet “A” around your neck if you misspell his middle name as “Allen”!). We’ll look at quite a variety of them, from the two Library of America editions of their tales. In the next part of the course, we’ll use Classic Slave Narratives (Signet ed.) to compare three narratives by Olaudah Equiano, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Jacobs. We then will consider three novels, two extremely popular and one not so popular: Susannah Rowson’s Charlotte Temple (1793, Oxford UP ed.), Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852, Harper Classics ed.) and Herman Melville’s Moby Dick (1851, Penguin ed., probably excerpted). Most students balk at reading that formidable text, but I’ll try to convince you that it’s a jazz riff in prose, and funny too. We may also read essays by Emerson and Thoreau, or perhaps Cooper’s Last of the Mohicans, if students are interested. The course will probably conclude with various poems by Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. I usually change the syllabus at least a little after the first week, when the introductory questionnaires tell me what you’ve already read and what you want to read.

The course will emphasize close readings and informal discussions. Work required: attendance, a short close-reading exercise in the first two weeks (2 pp., 5%), three comparative close readings (4–6 pp., 25% each), and weekly take-home quizzes/responses (20%). No final exam. I give A’s to essays using an original and spirited argument to illuminate complexities of language as well as theme. I give B+’s to well organized, well developed, relatively error-free essays with sparks of originality or daring, and B’s to competent essays needing more complex development and/or clearer focus. Lower grades usually imply greater problems with development, focus, structure, grammar, and excessive summarizing. Recurrent grammatical errors lower the grade; spelling errors and typos don’t, within reason. The best essays sustain complex and/or audacious arguments; a good “B” essay capably compares themes.

Grades will be based entirely on students’ writing. I don’t include class participation in the grading because I try to make class sessions non-judgmental and relaxed, so that anyone can try out ideas without feeling silly, weird, or stupid. To find out more, come by my office at 4362 Turlington. My office hours this Fall are Tuesday 3–5 p.m. and by arrangement. Please feel free to call me at home (371-7461, before 9:30 p.m.) or at the office (392-6650 x283), or e-mail me, at <Ldavid@english.ufl.edu>.

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AML 3270

African-American Literature I: Beginning to 1946

LaMonda Horton Stallings

African-American Literature: Beginning to 1946 will provide a survey of the most significant writings of Black Americans from 1760 to 1946. It is meant to introduce students to a variety of authors, genres, and periods. This course will emphasize the development, continuities, and discontinuities within the literary tradition. We will pay special attention to issues of fictional representation of the black experience, including issues of heritage, identity, feminism, sexuality, and the idea of the African diaspora. Literature to be supplemented with film, art, and critical readings

Required texts:

Requirements:

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AML 3271

African-American Literature 2

Mark A. Reid

This course extends the definition of African American literature to include visual narratives by well-known artists as well as those whose works have been overlooked for various reasons. Readings and film screenings will cover such playwrights as Amiri Baraka, Lorraine Hansberry, Adrienne Kennedy, novelists as Paule Marshall, James McBride, Toni Morrison, John A. Williams, poets as Bob Kaufman, Audre Lorde, Pat Parker, and visual artists as Cheryl Dunye, Spike Lee, Darnell Martin, Michelle Parkerson, and Marlon Riggs. Lectures and class discussions will explore how artists, using black vernacular and various other literary and visual strategies, dramatize contemporary social and psychological conflicts that occur when individuals and groups resist societal pressures to conform to hegemonic beliefs about race, sexuality, and gender. (To describe a hegemonic belief formation is not to say that a majority supports this belief system about race, sexuality, and gender, but to say that there appears to be no other alternative to this singular racialized-sexualized-gendered vision of society.)

Course requirements:

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AML 4225

America In Print

Stephanie Smith

In 1846, critic and writer Margaret Fuller published an essay titled, “American Literature: Its Position in the Present Time, and Prospects for the Future,” in which she surveyed the field, as it were, of her time and made predictions for the future – our future. Returning to that essay as a launching point, this class is going to re-examine an “American” literary heritage, what it is, what it might mean, and where it went after 1846, with a particular focus on the publishing industry and its role in the making of American print culture.

Readings will likely include:

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AML 4242

The Poetics of Democracy in Twentieth Century America

Glenn Freeman

This course will examine a variety of ways that twentieth century poets have approached issues of representation: of self, of community, of nation. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which poets have negotiated – and productively used – the tension between individual “self-expression” and group affiliation or identity. As Walt Whitman said, “One’s self I sing, a simple separate person / yet utter the word Democratic, the word en-masse.” This tension effectively makes the “poetic” voice an embodiment of the paradox of democracy. Through shifting poetics, then, we will attempt to trace evolving visions of American democracy as they arise out of Enlightenment and Romantic models of individuality and personal liberties, accommodating or resisting new possibilities. In many ways, this will inevitably trace, then, an ongoing conversation with Whitman and his attempt to create a new, “American” poetics of inclusion, egalitarianism and personal freedom. We will focus on longer poems or poetic sequences, reading works by Jean Toomer, William Carlos Williams, Hilda Doolittle, Allen Ginsberg, John Berryman, Sylvia Plath, and Adrienne Rich among others. There will be three essays – a close reading, a comparative analysis, and a final research project – and an oral teaching report.

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AML 4282

“Black Is Beautiful!”: The Cultural Politics of Gender & Sexuality in the Black Power Era

Amy Abugo Ongiri

From the first proclamation “Black Is Beautiful!” to attempts to institutionalize “the natural” as an authentic expression of Black Power, African Americans have sought to express power and freedom through cultural interventions. This class will begin with an examination of the Black Arts movement – called the “sister to the Black Power movement” by Larry Neal – and end with Blaxploitation film in order to consider the ways in which visual culture and the arts provided powerful mediums for contesting existing racial politics. We will view films such as Shaft, Super Fly, and May Day Panther, examine the cultural interventions coming from Black radical political groups such as the Black Panther Party and the US Organization and read the poetry and fiction of writers such as Amiri Baraka, Don L. Lee, Larry Neal, and Caroline Rodgers in order to examine the ways in which constructions of subjectivity within Black nationalist discourse and practice is both reliant on and subversive of rigid constructions of gender and sexuality that come out of African American cultural traditions. We will also explore contemporary challenges to the Black cultural politics scripted in the Black Power era from Black Queer and Feminist theory and practice. We will investigate the ways in which contemporary understandings of the categories of gender and sexuality potentially alter the paradigm of Black nation created in a Black Power discourse.

Texts examined may include:

Films include:

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AML 4311

Emily Dickinson

Richard Brantley

AML 4311 (The Poetry of Emily Dickinson) will focus on such stylistic traits as her famous dashes and nonrecoverable deletions and on such characteristic themes as love, death, God, and nature. The text is The Poetry of Emily Dickinson (edited by Thomas H. Johnson). The midterm and final (twenty percent each) will emphasize essay-writing. Two six-page papers (twenty-five percent each) are required. Attendance counts 7% and participation 3%. The approach is historical, interdisciplinary, biographical, and formalisitc.

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AML 4453

American Protest Literature

Patricia Schmidt

This course explores the period of American history during which boundaries of propriety were challenged, new tolerance for individual rights blossomed, and Robert Kennedy’s plaintiff question “Will the center hold?” aptly captured both the rate and intensity of social change. Through novels such as Catch 22 and One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, selected films, as well as various works of non fiction, we shall probe for the underlying factors that fueled the period. The course will require a long research paper, as well as shorter and more personal papers that will provide the opportunity for synthesis and reflection.

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AML 4685

Contemporary African American & Latino/a Prison Literature

Amy Abugo Ongiri

This course explores contemporary African American and Latino/a prison literature in relationship to an international tradition of prison writing. It will explore the ways in which contemporary literature by African American and Latino/a authors works out of this tradition but also works against the growing crisis of incarceration in the United States. Readings cover a range of genres from true crime, mystery, poetry, and the political essay in order to complicate thinking about what it means to live in a country that currently incarcerates more people than any other country in the world. Some issues we will examine include: historical visions of the prison industrial complex, constructions of criminality, gender and the politics of punishment, juvenile justice, and the relationship between art and politics.

Texts examined may include:

Readings will also include the poetry of Caroline Baxter, Raul Salinas and Jimmy Santiago Baca, and the theoretical work of Joy James, H. Bruce Franklin, Angela Davis, Leonard Peltier, Black Prison Movements USA, and Ward Churchill among others.

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CRW 3110

Reading & Writing Short Stories

David Leavitt

What is a short story? No genre has so consistently eluded definition. Stories can range from eighty pages (Thomas Mann’s “Death in Venice”) to a single sentence (Amy Hempel’s “Housewife”). The purpose of this seminar will be to explore the parameters of this seductive and evasive form, from the standpoint both of the practitioner and the reader.

The seminar will be built around the idea that writers learn by reading. Therefore you may find the reading load heavier than is typical for a fiction workshop. Each week you will be asked to read a selection of stories by an English or American writer, and to arrive in class prepared to discuss them cogently. This conversation will take up roughly a third of our allotted time; the other two-thirds will be devoted to discussion of your own work (presented according to a pre-arranged schedule) and occasional in-class exercises.

For the first several weeks, I’ll be giving you assignments of a vaguely experimental nature – for instance, to tell a story from the viewpoint of an historical figure of your own choosing (Janis Joplin, Jack the Ripper). You’ll then set to work on stories of your own devising, which may have evolved from these exercises. The requirement of the class, in terms of writing, is that you complete two stories, the first by midterm and the second by term’s end. (The second may be an outgrowth of the first.) It goes without saying that attendance is mandatory, and that failure to show up (along with failure to do the reading) will have an adverse effect on your final grade. Grading will be based on your informed participation in the seminar, the critical acuity you show when judging other students’ writing, and your willingness to work hard: to be the best writer you can be, and to emerge at the end of the semester a better writer than you were at the beginning.

The reading many include stories by John Cheever, William Trevor, Alice Munro, Flannery O’Connor, Grace Paley, Deborah Eisenberg, Allan Gurganus, Amy Hempel and W.G. Sebald.

Final note: although flexibility is essential to any writing workshop, so is structure. The same can be said – and must be said – of the writing process.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.).

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by October 17, 2003.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

Jill Ciment

This course will be run in the ‘traditional’ workshop fashion with occasional lectures on structure, metaphor, plot, etc. Writing exercises will be assigned at the beginning, but the primary emphasis is on self generated work. Each student will be expected to write two short stories, as well as complete a final draft of each.

Optimally, students will turn in stories that they have taken as far as they can on their own. The workshop should be a venue to test the waters, to try new things, to present first drafts as well as polished works, but only after the writer has struggled with it to the nth degree. The idea is for students to rigorously challenge themselves. Everyone not presenting work should take their jobs as critics and editors as seriously as they take their own writing.

Required reading:

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.).

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by October 17, 2003.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry

William Logan

“I have two acting styles. With and without a horse.”
– Robert Mitchum

“I suppose you want me to go to night school and read poems.”
– James Cagney, The Public Enemy

In this workshop we will submit to the various bellows, roars, whispers, and seductions of modern poetry. You will read a broad selection of poems, from Walt Whitman to Gjertrud Schnackenberg, and write a poem a week. Every week the workshop will consider for discussion poems from the past and poems from students. We will attempt to find a place for frivolity and fecklessness within the seriousness of verse, and hope that within our studies cheerfulness will keep breaking in. The workshop will include readings in the poetry of the past century as well as the poetry of the age, and we will spend a few weeks on versification.

This is an advanced workshop in poetry, for students who have already taken the intermediate workshop (CRW 2300) and want to press their understandings of poetic language even further. Early admission is by manuscript. Please submit the manuscript, using the guidelines boxed below, to the instructor’s mailbox or by email to <wlogan@english.ufl.edu>.

Required reading:

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.).

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by October 17, 2003.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 4905

Advanced Seminar in Fiction Writing

Jill Ciment

This course will be run in the ‘traditional’ workshop fashion with occasional lectures on structure, metaphor, plot, etc. Writing exercises will be assigned at the beginning, but the primary emphasis is on self generated work. Each student will be expected to write two short stories, as well as complete a final draft of each.

Optimally, students will turn in stories that they have taken as far as they can on their own. The workshop should be a venue to test the waters, to try new things, to present first drafts as well as polished works, but ONLY after the writer has struggled with it to the nth degree. The idea is for students to rigorously challenge themselves. Everyone not presenting work should take their jobs as critics and editors as seriously as they take their own writing.

Required reading:

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.).

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by October 17, 2003.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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CRW 4906

Advanced Seminar in Poetry

Debora Greger

We read.
We write.
We talk.
We revise.
We rock.

Among cavers, it is bad form to discuss the furthest limits too openly. If you bring too much equipment, the cave will be scared, and stop. So the [depth] record was only almost openly discussed. Alexander Klimchouk [an authority on limestone aquifers and Senior Scientist of the Geological Institute at the National Academy of the Ukraine] had told us it could be a record.

First we create a cave in our imagination. Then by our efforts we create it to correspond… In mountaineering you know your goal – the peak is on the map. Cavers have not so much preliminary information – this comes with exploration. So, when we descend, we have no horizon we are making for – there is only an apparent horizon.

– Yuri Kasian, Ukrainian caver

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.).

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by October 17, 2003.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

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ENC 3310

Advanced Exposition

Wayne Losano

This is a standard, traditional (old-fashioned) composition course focusing on familiar rhetorical modes of development (narrative, description, analysis, etc.) with a heavy emphasis on style and rhetorical effectiveness and perhaps a nod towards “creative nonfiction.” Grammatical competence will be assumed although helped along a bit as necessary. The course is primarily intended for those who plan to teach writing or who will need to write as part of their graduate or professional studies or their later careers. It is not, however, as immediately practical as Professional Communication (ENC 3250) for those considering positions in industry. Usually five papers are required along with analysis of selected essays and assorted in-class writing activities.

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ENC 3312

Advanced Argumentative Writing

Patricia Schmidt

No course description is available at this time.

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ENC 3414

Hypermedia

Greg Ulmer

ENC 3414 treats the World Wide Web in particular, and the Internet in general, as an object of study worthy of the same critical and theoretical attention as that given to cinema and television. We will be concerned not only with the new forms of art and entertainment emerging online, but also with the internet as a new “public sphere,” a new site in which citizens participate in the making of collective as well as of personal meaning and identity. We will gain some perspective by placing the invention of the web in the context of the cultural transformations associated with film and print (the screen and the page). The projects for the semester focus on the similarity among the features of digital media, creative thinking, and entertainment narratives. ENC 3414 is taught in a computerized classroom, and all assignments involve making websites. No previous experience with computing (other than word processing) is required.

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ENC 4956

Overseas Studies

Undergraduate Coordinator

Prerequisite: This course must be approved by the Undergraduate Coordinator before the student travels overseas. It may be repeated with a change of topic up to a maximum of 15-credit hours.

This study, which may count towards the English major, involves course work taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

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ENG 3010

Modern Criticism

James Paxson

Modern Criticism (and Literary Theory) provides an introduction to some of the major theoretical schools in twentieth-century literary criticism. Central to our study will be the historical trajectory of structuralism, phenomenology, and deconstruction. Also of importance will be psychoanalysis, myth or archetypal criticism, and various forms of historical criticism or historicism. Students will learn how approaches in critical theory are themselves historically derived. With that end in mind, we will use as our main text the Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism (Vincent Leitch, general editor). We will also develop this theoretical knowledge with practical application by studying a small group of poems, films, and novels (such as Bram Stoker’s Dracula) intensively for the term. Two papers and a final examination. Attendance is required.

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ENG 3011

Theorists: Jacques Derrida

Julian Wolfreys

Focusing on the questions of aesthetics and art, moving from painting and drawing to the visual arts in general, this seminar will focus principally on one text by Jacques Derrida, The Truth in Painting, although it will also have occasion to consider other publications considered to be related, however tangentially or elliptically. Pursuing a close reading of The Truth in Painting, we will also be reading those texts referred to or addressed by Derrida. These will include books and essays by Immanuel Kant and Martin Heidegger, amongst others. The course will seek to elucidate concepts and quasi-concepts in Derrida’s writing such as subjectile, trace, writing, parergon, and différance. In approaching Derrida through such concerns and the textual relations that are therein implied, the purpose of this course will be to examine what we understand, and what we think we mean, by terms such as ‘art’, ‘aesthetics’, ‘perception’, ‘representation’, ‘mimesis’, and so on. In doing so, it is hoped that students will come to reflect on the ways in which Derrida transforms irreversibly the possibilities of seeing, reading, and thinking.

Course requirements: two 10–15 page research papers, properly documented; evidence of thorough preparation for class; regular contribution to in-class discussion.

Principal reading will include:

*The essays indicated will be included in a photocopy packet, along with other relevant material

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ENG 3063

Advanced Grammar: Analysis & Application

Wayne Losano

This course is intended primarily for students planning to be writing teachers or professional editors and who will need to know essential terminology and reasons for grammatical changes to enhance their credibility as teachers and editors. We will cover as many aspects of formal grammar as we can cram into one semester, covering topics ranging from parts of speech and sentence patterns to diagramming, modification, and rhetorical grammar. No exams or major papers are required but some work – take-home or in-class exercises, editing work, reading tests, etc. will be required for every class and the final grade will be based simply on the success of these accumulated activities.

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ENG 3115

Introduction to Film: Theory and Criticism

Renuka Bisht

This course offers an intensive study of film theories, criticisms and their relationship to critical practices.

In the first part of the course, we will view American films in relation to canonical theorizing on questions of the auteur, the gaze etc. Our discussions will attend to both the contextual specificities of these films and the conceptual paradigms of Psychoanalysis, Marxism, Feminism and so on that are deployed in the writings about these films. In the second part of this course, we will put on a global lens to attend to the brilliant diversity of international cinematic approaches. This class does not claim to offer an all-inclusive coverage of the theory and practice of film, but it introduces students to some of the major conversations – such as those about spectator agency and generic hybridity – animating Film Studies today.

This class has a demanding reading schedule. We will read many lengthy and difficult theoretical texts and view a challenging variety of films. Students must keep up with readings and discussions to make theoretically rigorous and contextually alert arguments about films.

Books (Available at Wild Iris Bookstore)

Course Requirements: Two essays of 8–10 pages each (35% and 35%), four quizzes (5 % each), and class participation (10%).

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ENG 3122

History of Film 2

Mark A. Reid

This course covers the international film history and several major artistic movements that make up this history. Lectures and class discussions will apply various critical approaches as Marxism, feminism, postcolonial, reception theory, and genre criticism to analyze international cinema. Students are expected to learn and correctly employ film and theoretical terminology when they discuss and write about film. The course covers the history of sound films, roughly from 1929 to the present. In this particular course offering, the class screenings and discussions survey various types of sound films (narrative, documentary, avant-garde and experimental) produced in the United States and elsewhere which address questions concerning film aesthetics, nation, gender, ethnicity, race and class issues as they relate to particular historical moments and movements.

Course Goals:

Students analyze how various types of films from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia imitate, appropriate, and/or resist dominant representational regimes and popular film genres. Students must employ film terminology, a combination of one or two critical approaches, and film history when analyzing and comparing various films and filmmakers. Students should leave this course with a sharpened critical understanding of the many ways to discuss film history and the filmmakers who have shaped this history.

Course Requirements and Grading:

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ENG 4015

Psychological Approaches to Literature: Lacan’s Poe

Terry Harpold

French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan’s decision to place the text of his 1955 “Seminar on ‘The Purloined Letter’”at the head of his collected essays, Écrits (1966), suggests that Lacan considered his analysis of Poe’s famous short story a signal example of his method. Debate concerning Lacan’s appropriation (misappropriation?) of Poe, initiated by philosopher Jacques Derrida’s 1975 response to the “Seminar,” has generated significant discussions of psychoanalytic concepts of truth and exemplarity, and of the relations of psychoanalysis to literary method.

In this course, we will undertake close readings of Poe’s short story and of Lacan’s “Seminar” and several of the most important critical responses to it. We will read Poe’s text and Lacan’s “Seminar” twice: as bookends to the critiques of Lacan (and responses to them); or – in another formulation of this relation – as repetitions or versions of a problematic in psychoanalytic literary theory and method. Parentheses within parentheses.

No prior familiarity with Lacanian psychoanalysis is assumed. Students should have some basic knowledge of Freudian psychoanalysis. Familiarity with contemporary literary and critical theory will be helpful.

Assigned readings for the course will include several short stories, poems and essays by Poe; Lacan’s “Seminar;” short texts or excerpts of longer works by Sigmund Freud; and several critical texts oriented by Lacan’s readings of Poe, including Derrida’s essay “The Purveyor of Truth” (his longest sustained critique of Lacan), and short texts by Marie Bonaparte, Bruce Fink, Irene Harvey and Barbara Johnson. Writing requirements include three take-home essay exams.

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ENG 4060

History of the English Language

Kevin McCarthy

The objective of the course is to study the origins and development of the English language, from Indo-European times to the present. We will study the syntax, pronunciation, semantics, and morphology of the language as it has evolved to the present.

Requirements: 3 tests and 1 term paper.

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ENG 4133

Post-National Film & the Infidelities of History

Richard Burt

Renaissance Remakes will focus on the Renaissance as a site where the (in)fidelities of film to history are played out and thematized by plots about adultery, betrayals, and transgressive sex; images of bodily leaks, wounds, and wastes serve as metaphors for the high-(in)fidelities – hearsay, noise, static, interruptions, and silences – inevitably produced as history gets remade through the media of film and print. In addition to the films mentioned above, we will examine a number of critical essays by film critics, historians, feminist critics, and we will view films made in the U.K., U.S., France, Italy, Poland, and Germany, mostly from the late twentieth century, that “remake” the Renaissance, including two music videos by Sting and R.E.M.; Caravaggio, Dangerous Beauty; Artemisia; Cyrano de Bergerac; and Elizabeth. For more information, go to the course website at <http://www.clas.ufl.edu/~rburt/remakingrenundergrad/>.

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ENG 4133

The ABCs of Cinema

Robert Ray

This course will study four Classic Hollywood movies: Grand Hotel (1932), The Philadelphia Story (1940), The Maltese Falcon (1941), and Meet Me in St. Louis (1944). Students will produce two 12-page papers totaling 26 entries, one for each letter of the alphabet, triggered by specific details that provoke speculations about Hollywood filmmaking and the cinema itself. In other words, the course requires close reading and careful writing.

Assignments: two 12-page papers; one or two oral reports; daily reading quizzes.

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ENG 4134

Women & Film

Maureen Turim

This course will examine how women have been represented in film, how they have participated in film production and how they consume film images. We will look at several feminist approaches and the range of debates as to how to address these issues.

The course will have several goals; to introduce you to the history of women in film, to increase your skills in reading film, in reading critical writing about film, and in understanding the relation between writing critical analysis and feminist theory.

Emphasis will be on such basic issues as viewer identification, social values and cultural context as currently formulated through various feminist and post-structuralist methodologies. We will explore how feminism intersects with psychoanalysis, ideology, deconstruction and related approaches. We will examine the conjuncture of theoretical issues with an experience of specific texts, and the function of these texts in the past and present workings of history.

Course Requirements: two papers of 8 pages each (35% and 35%), plus class discussion and miscellaneous assignments (30%); participation in class discussion is essential.

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ENG 4135

French Cinema

Sylvie Blum

The class provides you with the opportunity to acquire a general and sometimes specific knowledge of the history of French sound cinema (1930s-1990s) with examples from earlier silent films. In this class, you will learn to read film by using appropriate terminology and film language, and by acquiring a theoretical approach to film analysis. You will acquire knowledge of contemporary French socio-political and cultural history as represented through cinema, skills in reading film as a visual medium, and knowledge of history of French cinema 1895-1990s with a few extra-territorial excursions. The films covered include a wide variety of genres, and styles (film noir, melodrama, colonial films, women’s films, documentary films etc.) Weekly screenings and attendance of a University of Florida/France-Florida Research Institute French Film festival (FACSEA) will be compulsory, as well as attendance to the screening of a specific francophone film (selected dates indicated on syllabus).

Teaching methods: lectures and group presentations on films, serious discussion of assigned readings, six analytical papers, a mid-term and a final. Individual creative projects are welcome and must be accompanied by an analytical paper describing the project. Prerequisites required: ENG 2300, ENG 3115, ENG 3121, and ENG 3122.

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ENG 4135

European Cinema

Maureen Turim

European cinema today narrates images of a much changed continent in the process of unification, while still sorting through the aftermaths of WWII, the process of decolonialization, and the history of Communism. This course will treat the national traditions of Western, Central, and Eastern Europe comparatively. Each European cinematic tradition was always highly aware, receptive to and competitive with the productions of the various component countries of Europe. The interaction between French and Polish filmmakers, or Swedish and German filmmakers, for example, was always significant. Spanish filmmakers made films with a French audience in mind, and sometimes in exile in France; this is just one example of the ways nations as political boundaries are only one way of considering the map of Europe. Now that European production often involves co-productions (for example France and Italy) and Europe has formed an economic union, the question of the European cinema as an interactive tradition is more important than ever. This course will concentrate on films that engage this dialogue between nations, and films that found their reception far beyond the national identities of their filmmakers. For those students who already have taken courses in various national cinemas, this course will allow you to expand your knowledge of how those traditions work internationally and historically. This course will also provide an introduction to several key stylistic movements of European cinema and the social and political contexts of these films. It will concentrate on the cinema of the nineties and the first years of the 21st century.

Course Requirements: two papers of 8 pages each (35% and 35%), plus class discussion and miscellaneous assignments (30%); participation in class discussion is essential.

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ENG 4146

Advanced Video Production – Editing/Found Footage

Roger Beebe

This course will focus on experimental editing practices using found footage. For 15 weeks we will explore the practice, theory and history of editing and more specifically of found footage filmmaking through a combination of screenings, readings, and hands-on production work. The course is designed to return initially to the very basic elements of editing (sequence, duration) in order to develop new approaches to editing from the ground up, as it were. As these new approaches come into focus, we will slowly add additional components (sound, motion) with each additional project. The ultimate aim is to produce work that meaningfully intervenes at the current moment in the historical evolution of the found footage tradition.

No previous experience in video production or non-linear editing is necessary, but the course will require an extensive use of Final Cut Pro (a non-linear editing program for the Mac), so some familiarity with Macs and/or Final Cut would certainly be an asset. Of more importance, however, is a willingness to experiment and to leave behind all preconceptions about what video is or might be.

The assignments for the course will be a series of three short video pieces (less than 3 minutes each) and one short film exercise (less than 100’) that will incrementally explore the basic elements of editing followed by a final project that will be slightly longer (5 min. max). Each assignment will also be coupled with a short paper in which the student will explain the theory behind his or her work.

Admission to the course is by consent of the instructor only. Interested students should contact Roger Beebe at <rogerbb@english.ufl.edu> before or during pre-registration in order to receive an application form.

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ENG 4905

Independent Study

Faculty Member of Choice

An Independent Study course may be taken for 1- to 3-credit hours and will count as credit toward the English major. This course may be repeated with a change of topic up to a maximum of 9 credits.

This course is for advanced students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The student must find a faculty member who is willing to supervise the semester-long study, and together, the two create a project. The student must meet with the professor at designated times, agreed upon in advance, and complete all assignments in a timely manner.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: The Brain & the Book

Norman Holland

I plan to open up issues like: What is going on when we are “rapt” or “absorbed” in a literary work? Why do we so easily accept the unrealities of fantasy, science fiction, or fairy stories? How are literary characters like and unlike real people? What is the effect of sitting in an audience? How do we acquire a style of reading and writing? Do cultural materials have an evolutionary effect? All cultures do literature – is literature something in our human genes? This is an exploratory seminar in a relatively new field, the application of cognitive science to our understanding of literary creation and response.

We will not be reading literature as such – I assume you have done a lot of that – but we will be discussing your experience as readers. We shall be reading such people as: Noam Chomsky, George Lakoff, Mark Johnson, Hanna and Antonio Damasio, Jerry Fodor, Heinz Lichtenstein, Steven Pinker, Mark Solms, John Tooby and Leda Cosmides. And we will be reading some people who have begun to apply these ideas to literary and aesthetic questions: Patrick Hogan, Mark Turner, Ellen Dissanayake, Ellen Winner, and myself.

Because a term paper is not appropriate for this level of this subject, I will give an hour exam and a final exam. Grades will be based on those plus reports on outside reading plus participation in online and class discussion.

This seminar comes out of the last three decades’ explosion of knowledge about the brain. In 1998, for example, there was a large, multi-session Forum at the MLA devoted to this topic, and there are several web sites continuing to develop it and also, of course, books and articles. I believe literary people will find the topic more and more relevant to thinking about literature.

Norman Holland is Marston-Milbauer Eminent Scholar in English. He is a leading figure in the discipline of literature-and-psychology in the U.S. and the world. He has written thirteen books and over 150 articles, many of them dealing with psychoanalytic or reader-response criticism. You can find out more about him at <http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/nnh>, where you can also look at the syllabus for an earlier version of this seminar.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Transgression

Julian Wolfreys

What do we imagine we mean when we speak of transgression? The Oxford English Dictionary defines transgression as the act of overstepping a limit or boundary, yet Michel Foucault has argued that only in the motion of crossing the boundary does transgression take place. Once we are the other side of the line, as it were, there is no longer transgression, only another location, another identity, which, although apparently illicit is, nonetheless as stable as that from which we have departed, from which we have deviated, and which we may or may not have subverted. The idea of transgression is, then, the idea of a certain motion or movement, rather than having or alluding to a stable meaning. In this seminar, we will be looking at the possible motions, the articulations, the performances, and events of transgression. We will seek to address whether transgression is ever truly possible, what an ideology of transgression might be, what political purposes it serves, and why what appears obviously ‘transgressive’, ‘deviant’, or ‘subversive’ is never truly so, but merely a variant acknowledged, tolerated, and therefore recuperated by dominant, so-called ‘normative’ hegemonic positions and the cultures that these support. This critical rejection of the conventional assumptions concerning transgression will, it is hoped, lead us to other definitions, more provisional, riskier, in and of themselves transgressive.

The reading load for this seminar is what might best be described as heavy. You will be required to stay on top of this at all times, to be disciplined and organized. Most importantly, however, you will be expected to come to this seminar leaving all your prejudices, assumptions, and bigotries at the door. Only those with an open mind and the ability to read carefully will do well.

Course requirements: three 10–15 page research papers, properly documented and researched: one is to be on fiction or poetry, one on theory, one on film; evidence of thorough preparation for class; regular contribution to in-class discussion. There will be films every other week. Attendance at film screenings is mandatory.

Principal Reading:

Fiction (Please note, this is a provisional list to be finalized, depending on availability):

Theory

There will also be a photocopy packet, with essays and extracts by Michel Foucault, Sigmund Freud, Julia Kristeva, the Marquis de Sade, Jacques Lacan, James R. Kincaid, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, amongst others.

Films

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Jane Austen and the Culture of Romanticism

Judith W. Page

This seminar will place Austen’s novels in the context of Romantic theory and literature, with particular attention to the concepts of landscape, imagination, domesticity, gender, and history. In addition to reading Austen and recent critical and theoretical texts, students will read selected authors from the period 1780–1830, including the canonical Romantic poets as well as such women authors as Anne Radcliffe, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Mary Shelley. We will also critique the aesthetic and ideological assumptions of several recent film versions of the novels.

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ENG 4940

Internship

Undergraduate Coordinator

The English Department at the University of Florida offers three* credit hours of internship to its majors who provide the following to the Undergraduate Coordinator for approval:

Once the Undergraduate Coordinator has approved the internship requested by the student, the department will register the student for the internship credits.

Upon completion of the internship:

*For two credit hours, the student would need to work 8 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 16 hours per week for Summer A or B.

*For one credit hour, the student would need to work 4 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 8 hours per week for Summer A or B.

Please note the following limitations on the English Internship:

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ENG 4953

Shakespeare: Feminist/Gender-Oriented Approaches

John Perlette

This course will focus on the dramatic works of Shakespeare, from which we will read as large a selection as time allows. We will also be reading a large amount of critical commentary on the plays and the contexts in which they were written. Shakespeare criticism is (literally) massive and incredibly varied. From the vast array of possibilities, I have chosen to attempt to impose some coherence by selecting recent criticism written from what might be called a feminist/gender perspective. In my opinion, some of the most interesting and innovative work on Shakespeare is being done in this mode. Our objective, then, will be not only to read Shakespeare, but also to investigate the particular contribution made by feminist/gender criticism to our understanding of Shakespeare’s texts and his times.

Texts:

The required primary text (ordered exclusively at Goerings) is The Norton Shakespeare, ed. Stephen Greenblatt, et al. (1997). Required secondary texts will be available in Xerox form.

Tentative reading list of the plays, in the order of reading:

(A play may be deleted and other titles may be substituted for or added to the above; you should expect some, though not much, change.)

Prerequisites:

Technically, none. I do not expect you to know, in advance, anything about Shakespeare, the early modern period, or literary critical theory, but I will expect you to know how to write a focused, organized, well-developed essay with a minimum of mechanical (i.e., spelling, grammar, punctuation) errors.

Requirements:

The most basic requirement is that you do all the reading with enough care and attention that you can remember key elements of both the primary and secondary texts. You will need to have a strong command of this material in order to do well on the mid-term and final (in-class) essay exams. In them you will be given substantial passages from the primary texts and asked, first, to identify text and context and, second (and most importantly), to analyze these passages, explaining the significance and implications of the statements, including the applicability of concepts from the secondary readings. This will require intensive initial readings of the texts, and some re-reading and review as well. You will also need to know and understand the particular critical approach we will be taking to these texts. Therefore, it will be important that you be actively engaged in the classroom sessions. Your understanding of the critical approach we employ will also be fundamentally important to the term paper you will write during the term. This essay will require that you do supplemental critical reading and apply (on your own) critical concepts from the secondary readings and class discussion to one of Shakespeare’s plays. (You will need to be able to write decently, as was mentioned above).

Attendance:

In the absence of a university-wide policy, each instructor sets his or her own. I expect you to be here – every day.

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ENG 4970

Honors Thesis Project

Faculty members (2) of Choice

Students must have have completed at least one semester of ENG 4936, Honors Seminar. Open to English Honors students.

The student must select two faculty members: one to direct the reading, research, and writing of a thesis on a topic of the student’s and director’s chosing, and another as the second reader. An abstract (100 to 200 words) and one copy of the thesis (30 to 50 pages) must be delivered to the CLAS Academic Advising Center on Fletcher Road at least 10 days before graduation.

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ENL 3132

The English Novel 20th Century: Fantasy & the English Imagination

Julian Wolfreys

The success of J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter books has been read by some as a renewed interest in children’s books and in reading itself. Yet this is only part of the story. So popular have the books been that, in Great Britain at least, ‘adult’ versions have been published, thereby indicating a broader readership beyond the category of children’s fiction. What this suggests is that the ‘English’ imagination or psyche (if we can speak of such a thing) has a strong investment in narratives of fantasy and the fantastic, an investment which this course will explore as a particular cultural phenomenon crossing all genres and age groups, serving in part to mediate and define a particular projection of Englishness. Therefore, we will be reading novels from the 20th century belonging to both ‘adult’ and ‘children’s’ literature to explore what these might share in terms of their foci, their interests, and concerns. We will be asking questions such as: how do narratives of fantasy and the fantastic figure national identity? How might they be read as mediating ideological fears and interests? What are the dominant hegemonic concerns manifested in such narratives? To what extent is fantasy a peculiarly ‘English’ phenomenon and what are the signs of this cultural identity? In order to explore these questions we will look at images of the grotesque, the bizarre, the surreal, and the transgressive as figures for opening to analysis from other locations politics, history, and culture.

Course requirements: three 10 page research papers, properly documented; evidence of thorough preparation for class; regular contribution to in-class discussion. There will be films every other week. Attendance at film screenings is mandatory.

Principal reading may include:

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ENL 3154

Modern British Poetry

Marsha Bryant

Responding to the violent aftermath of Ireland’s Easter Rebellion of 1916, W. B. Yeats wrote of a time in which “All changed, changed utterly.” The poets we will assess in this course reflect the onslaught of cultural changes that shaped “the widening gyre” of the 20th century. We begin with Yeats and then move to Wilfred Owen, the most famous poet of the Great War that would kill him in 1918. In Eliot’s long poem The Waste Land, modernist innovation and postwar disillusion combine in a vivid simulation of cultural decline. W. H. Auden’s work of the 1930s captured the sense of impending crisis that would erupt at the outbreak of WWII, while Stevie Smith’s darkly comic poems and drawings challenged changing gender roles in the years between the wars. Philip Larkin’s post-war vision cast a cynical eye on modern romance and Britain’s international status. For Ted Hughes, violence became the defining feature of our relationships with one another and with the natural world. In 80s and 90s, Carol Ann Duffy wrote alternative voices into British poetry through monologues spoken by women and immigrants, and through lesbian love poems. Finally, Michael Hofmann reconfigures poetic diction through a postmodern sensibility in which gender, family, and nation are all dislocated.

Written assignments will include analytical and creative papers.

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ENL 3210

Medieval English Literature

James Paxson

Medieval English Literature is a general introduction to the thought and culture of the Middle English period (c. 1100–1500 CE). It will thus serve mainly as a resource or backgrounds course designed to prepare students for Chaucer as well as for Renaissance authors. Much energy will thus be devoted to the influence of classical culture on the medieval imagination, while special attention will be paid to the institutions of medieval interpretation and allegory. We will study key genres including epic, romance, the allegorical dream vision, the philosophical debate, and the travel narrative not only to appreciate their literary or aesthetic dimensions but also to take into account medieval systems of psychology, ethics, history, theology, rhetoric, poetics, and semiotics; issues of gender and sexuality will figure prominently. Students should thereby develop knowledge in the various critical, literary, or cultural theories that have come to shape contemporary medieval studies in particular and English studies in general. Authors include Virgil, Ovid, St. Augustine, the Beowulf Poet, the Pearl Poet, William Langland, and John Mandeville. Two papers plus a final examination. Attendance is required.

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ENL 3231

The Age of Johnson

Patricia Craddock

In the history of British literature, the second half of the “long eighteenth century” – roughly 1740–1810 – has been called by several titles, such as the Enlightenment, the Pre-Romantic period, the Georgian age, and the Age of Johnson. Others that might be used include the Age of the Literature of Everyday Life, the Age of Classical Prose, the Age of Revolutions, the Age of Expansion – we might go on and on. Why, then, do we settle on “The Age of Johnson”? Samuel Johnson wrote only one novel, only one play, only a small volume of poems – and some of those were in Latin. How can such a man give his name to an “age”? Essentially, he did so by his intellectual range and influence, especially his extraordinary contributions in a wide variety of nonfictional genres, including the oral genre, conversation, as recorded by his friend and biographer, James Boswell.

Author of the first great English dictionary (and inventor of the idea of a dictionary that traced the usage and change of usage of words by quotations from significant writers), famous throughout the English-speaking world as an essayist, and notable as a great editor and critic, as well as for his original works, he will be represented by several works in this course. But we will also read the works of many of his friends, male and female, and some of his enemies. Whenever Johnson undertook a new form of writing, he tried to think out what that form of writing ought to be – and therefore, he was not only experimental and original in his own works, but encouraged similar responsible innovation in others.

We will see that originality in poems by “canonical” writers such as Goldsmith, Blake, Thomson, Gray, Johnson himself, Cowper and Crabbe, but also in poems by women writers and the Scots “plowboy” Robert Burns. We will also see it in surprising literary forms such as travel books, biographies, letters, diaries and autobiographies, philosophical dialogues, political speeches, and history, considering writers such as Piozzi and d’Arblay, as well as Boswell, Gibbon, Burke, Goldsmith, Johnson, Reynolds, Wollstonecraft, and Hume.

In drama, emerging from the lachrymose period of sentimental “weeping” comedy, we will enjoy two masterpieces that have remained in the standard repertory until this day, Goldsmith’s She Stoops to Conquer and one of Sheridan’s “greatest hits,” either The Rivals or The School for Scandal.

Finally, we will explore at least two short experiments in fiction, probably either Johnson’s Rasselas (comparable to Voltaire’s Candide) or the ancestral Gothic novel, Walpole’s Castle of Otranto, and Edgeworth’s influential Castle Rackrent, which introduced both regional fiction and saga novels and a new kind of unreliable narrator.

Obviously the outline above includes more than we can do in one semester, but even so, it does not do justice to the riches available to the student of “The Age of Johnson.” Remarkably, it is also the first great period in the history of the English novel, but the major novels are lengthy and the subject of another course. Even without the major works of Fielding, Richardson, Sterne, Austen, and d’Arblay, however, this relatively unfamiliar period offers many riches to the modern reader.

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ENL 3241

The Romantic Period

James Twitchell

This is an undergraduate survey of English romantic writers. It is roughly divided into nine parts: an introduction to romanticism, and then eight sections on individual writers. There is, relative to other English courses, little outside reading, as the main concern of the course is a careful reading of selected representative works. This is deceptive, for students might assume that the course will therefore be easy. There will be weekly quizzes (embarrassingly objective for an English course) and two short papers (not necessarily research papers). The quizzes give me a chance to get answers to questions I think are important; the papers give you a chance to form answers to questions you think are important. The class is informal and relaxed, but the quizzes and papers are not. The quizzes stress material covered in class and so it might be suggested that you take good and careful notes.

Texts

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ENL 3241

The Romantic Period: Early British Romanticism

Judith W. Page

This course will focus on selected authors from the first generation of British Romantic writers, including:

We will discuss various questions in literature and culture from the 1780s until around 1814, including the relationship between literary and popular culture (particularly gothic and folk traditions), revolutions in politics and in poetic genres and styles, practical and theoretical problems of canon formation, as well as questions of gender and sexuality. Students will be expected to read texts closely and carefully.

Students will write at least two papers and take midterm and final exams.

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ENL 3241

The Romantic Period

James Twitchell

This is an undergraduate survey of English romantic writers. It is roughly divided into nine parts: an introduction to romanticism, and then eight sections on individual writers. There is, relative to other English courses, little outside reading, as the main concern of the course is a careful reading of selected representative works. This is deceptive, for students might assume that the course will therefore be easy. There will be weekly quizzes (embarrassingly objective for an English course) and two short papers (not necessarily research papers). The quizzes give me a chance to get answers to questions I think are important; the papers give you a chance to form answers to questions you think are important. The class is informal and relaxed, but the quizzes and papers are not. The quizzes stress material covered in class and so it might be suggested that you take good and careful notes.

Texts

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ENL 3251

Victorian Literature

Lisa Hager

This course will seek to define the contours of Victorian literature – its obsessions, tensions, particulars, and world views. Since literature reveals the workings of culture, we shall endeavor to create an ongoing conversation on the nature of those workings as we piece together the conversation in which the work itself participates through both in-class discussions and weekly written responses. We will focus on a number of issues that were vitally important to the Victorians and continue to be debated in our own time such as the Woman Question, class conflicts, Crisis of Faith, and degeneracy/decadence.

The goal of this course is to encourage an understanding of each individual work within the larger context of Victorian literature and, by doing so, to learn how to read poetry, drama, and fiction critically. The goal in this enterprise is to construct essays that write about these genres in a thoughtful, convincing, and effective manner.

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ENL 4220

Renaissance Literature: Elizabethan Prose

John Perlette

Course Description: In the realm of Elizabeth I, in the era of Shakespeare and Spenser, in the Golden Age of English lyric, epic, and dramatic poetry, prose fictions formed a large, popular, and important component of the literary production of the time. Highly varied in form and style, these stories and tales also served a variety of ideological functions. The course will concentrate on prose fictions written and/or published during the reign of Elizabeth I (1559–1603). Specifically, we will focus on the interplay between text and society in terms of developments such as the impact of print, the persecution of witches, the decline of the aristocracy, the emergence of individualism and the transvaluation of labor. Our fundamental concern will be with the textual production and/or subversion of ideologies of gender and of status and class. My goal is to provide a course useful not only to students interested in the Renaissance, but also for those interested more generally in narrative fiction (or the novel) and ideological critique, in feminist/gender approaches, and in the relationship of literature to society.

Required primary texts

Tentative reading list, in the order of reading

Other titles may be substituted for or added to the above. This primary list will be supplemented by a secondary list of brief critical analyses or theoretical discussions (in xerox copy).

Prerequisites: Technically, none, though you should bear in mind that this is an upper division course in which you may be competing with people who have had some experience in thinking about and analyzing literary texts. I do not expect you to know anything about Elizabethan England or its literature, but I will expect you to know how to write a focused, organized, well-developed essay with a minimum of mechanical (i.e., spelling, grammar, punctuation) errors. Requirements will include two in-class essay exams and a course paper.

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ENL 4221

Renaissance Literature: 17th Century Poetry

Ira Clark

In this course we will be reading Milton’s Paradise Lost plus what are often regarded as the greatest lyrics in English. We will attend first to understanding the poems, and second, to establishing contexts within which and approaches from which to read and write about poetry, especially poetry of the era. After Paradise Lost we will focus on traditions of secular lyric; then we will view theological and devotional contexts of sacred lyrics.

Students will be responsible for contemplating as well as reading every work assigned before the class meets to discuss it, so that you can listen profitably to the lectures on the backgrounds and participate knowledgeably in discussions of the works. The course should develop from lectures towards discussions, with students gaining independence and proficiency in understanding the period, interpreting the poems, and arguing articulately both orally and in writing for readings.

Grades will be based on eleven unannounced quizzes or brief take-home assignments and three papers. The brief unannounced quizzes/take-home assignments will occur intermittently and take a variety of forms (40% of the grade); one may be dropped. The three papers will come due at the end of each of the three sections of the course. Paper I will answer a take-home question about some issue in Paradise Lost (about 2500 words, 20% of the grade). Paper II should present your close reading of any secular lyric or cluster of secular lyrics in the text (about 2500 words, 20% of the grade). Paper III should present your close reading of any sacred lyric or cluster of sacred lyrics in the text (about 2500 words, 20% of the grade). All three papers should be tightly argued, fully exemplified and interpreted, and stylishly written. They must be typed.

This course abides by the University’s policies on plagiarism and academic honesty. Except for grave illness or death in the immediate family, I neither accept late work nor grant incompletes. For a student to earn credit for the course, that student must complete all work.

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ENL 4273

Twentieth Century British Literature

Roselinde Supheert

This course offers a chronological survey of twentieth-century British literature in its historical and cultural context. We will examine literary movements such as Modernism, the Movement, Postmodernism and Postcolonialism, but we will also see that some work escapes strict classification. Every week we will read interesting and representative texts that illustrate the developments and fluctuations in British literature in the twentieth century. The novels, poems and the play will be analysed using content and formal aspects. Authors include Wilfred Owen, T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Graham Greene, John Osborne, Philip Larkin, Ted Hughes, Jean Rhys, Angela Carter, Patricia Duncker, Derek Walcott and J.M. Coetzee. Although there will be some lecturing, the basic class format is discussion so all students will be expected to come to class prepared to contribute to the discussions.

Texts:

Format:

Class sessions include lectures and discussions.

Assessment:

Students will write a library report (20%) and research paper (20%) in the first half of the course. They will also take a final exam (40%). Quizzes and participation will contribute towards the final grade (20%).

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare, Transnational Cinema & Mass Media

Richard Burt

This course will examine Shakespeare’s adaptation, appropriation, circulation, and citation in cinemas and other mass media such as novels, comics, and popular music from the US to the UK, Europe, India, and Japan. We will discuss the film and other media adaptations and citations not in terms of their fidelity or infidelity to Shakespeare print versions of the plays but as films in their own right. Our focus will be a consideration of what Shakespeare enables various films and mass media to do that they could not otherwise do without him. Rather than compare and contrast the films to the texts, we will analyze them from the varied perspectives of film theory, cultural studies, post-colonial studies in relation to the wider context of generic trends, industrial strategies, new technologies, stardom, the auteur, the transationalization of cinema, and so on. Films will include Kurosawa Akira’s Throne of Blood and Ran, Olivier’s Henry V, Michael Almereyda’s Hamlet, Michael Hoffmann’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and The Emperor’s Club, Richard Loncraine’s Rihcard III, J. Nair’s Kannagi and Othello, among others. Prerequisites: a prior course on Shakespeare and a course in film studies are both highly recommended. For more information, go the course website at http://www.clas.ufl.edu/~rburt/engENL4333Sh.

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare

Mel New

We will read twenty plays, divided among Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances. This is a course that will concentrate on reading the plays, as opposed to enacting them, watching film-versions, or using them as sounding boards for whatever political or social hobby-horse one happens to be riding this month. Students who don’t like to read, and who have difficulty meeting daily assignments will not do well in this class, since we will be reading two or three acts every class period. There will be daily quizzes to ensure timely reading and written work as well. I am most interested in appreciating Shakespeare for the same reasons he has been appreciated by 400 years of readers, rather than finding reasons for his relevance to the 21st century, which, I fear, is becoming more and more irrelevant to Shakespeare. We will strive to recapture whatever it was that, in the past, made human beings relevant to him, so that generations of readers could feel he was as astute an observer of them as of the men and women in his own time and place. In other words, we will treat Shakespeare as a poet, and his plays as literature, and we may even use words like beauty, truth, and, in wilder moments, mellifluous.

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LIN 4605

World Englishes

Roger Thompson

The English language has more than one billion speakers world wide. Many millions speak English as a native language, many more speak English as a second language, but most speak it as a foreign language. However, English is more than a language that people learn to express their thoughts. It is also a social phenomenon that promotes and reinforces certain types of social behavior. Some say that English is a deadly virus that is permeating the world and destroying local cultures. Others say it is a benevolent medicine that will cure the ills of the world as it promotes social and economic advancement. Whatever the case, we will take note of the linguistic differences among the various versions of English used around the world and look at the sociolinguistics that surrounds English in various settings.

Resources

Required textbooks:

WWW-based resources:

<http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/rthompso/worldenglishresources.html>

Journal readings:

World Englishes (online and PE1128.A2 W67)

Grades

Total is divided by 400 and grades are assigned 90–100 A, 87–89 B+, 80–86 B, 77–79 C+, 70–76 C, 67–69 D+, 60–66 D, 59 and lower E.

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LIT 3031

Readings in Contemporary Poetry

Debora Greger

Texts:

You say you are ‘reading about wasps’– in reference to my poem ‘Santarém.’ Now if I’d written ‘beehive’! – I have read about bees, but know nothing of wasps except for being stung once. ‘Santarém’ happened, just like that, a real evening & a real place, and a real Mr. Swan who said that – it is not a composite at all.

Your piece about my ‘Recent Poems’ fascinates me. I never dreamed of Alice in Wonderland in connection of ‘Crusoe in England.’ I don’t believe I ever read The Little Prince & when I wrote the poem I hadn’t re-read Robinson Crusoe for at least 20 years.

I never heard of Katherine May Peek and many other writers you mention – or haven’t read them, not even Virgil’s Eclogues! You reduce me to illiteracy! In the Duxbury poem (‘The End of March’) the water was the color of mutton-fat jade; I wasn’t aware of any echo until you pointed it out. And my feelings are hurt by your thinking I’d gulp ‘grog à l’americaine’!

Well, it takes an infinite number of things coming together, forgotten, or almost forgotten, books, last night’s dream, experiences past and present – to make a poem. The settings, or descriptions, of my poems are almost invariably just plain facts – or as close to the facts as I can write them. But, as I said, it is fascinating that my poem should arouse in you all those literary references!

—the poet Elizabeth Bishop to the critic Jerome Mazzaro,
April 27, 1978

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LIT 3031

Modern Poet Laureates

Marsha Bryant

This course will assess various relationships between the poet and society through the figure of the 20th century poet laureate in the U.K. and U.S. John Masefield, Cecil Day-Lewis, and Sir John Betjeman will provide examples from the British side, and Ted Hughes an in-depth study. From the U.S. we will cover Robert Frost, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Mark Strand, with Rita Dove providing in-depth study. In addition, we will read Raymond Williams’s Culture and Society: 1780–1950, Rita Dove’s A Poet’s World, and Robert Pinsky’s Democracy, Culture, and the Voice of Poetry. Writing assignments will address poetic and critical material, as well as poet laureates’ presence in the media.

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LIT 3041

Studies in Drama: Citizen Comedy & Domestic Tragedy in the Age of Shakespeare

Robert Thomson

A study of a group of plays unified by being set in the contemporary London and environs of their authors in the late sixteenth century or the opening decades of the seventeenth century. The main focus will be upon the texts and their social, political, historical and cultural contexts.

It has been suggested that City Comedy (however we define it) moved to the center of the Elizabethan Stage when Londoners started to reflect upon their new social roles and their urban setting. Social mobility with its attendant pretensions, hypocrisy, greed, pathos etc, arose in the midst of the new middle class society of trade and commerce and gave substance to these plays, as did the threatened state of an increasingly impoverished and newly dependent gentry.

The plays to be studied will be:

Two essays will be set (ca. 2000 words) and in addition there will be a number of in-class tests and oral reports There will be no final exam.

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LIT 3043

Studies in Modern Drama

Sid Homan

We will explore the medium of the theatre in two practical and immediate ways. One will be by “doing it” – rehearsing and performing scenes with a partner, and thereby experiencing the full dimensions of a play. After all, the play as performed is not just the text on the page but a variety of non-verbal, visual, spatial, and temporal elements: the subtext (what the character is feeling beneath the actual dialogue), blocking and stage movement, gestures, a host of non-verbal sounds at the actor’s option, along with lighting, costumes, and sound. To this end, we will use Pinter’s The Lover and Old Times, Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, and Shepard’s True West and Curse of the Starving Class.

We will also explore the theatre by involvement with the people staging plays. We will meet with the director and attend rehearsals of the brilliant Chilean play Secret Obscenities, where Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud have been reduced to elderly flashers sitting on a park bench outside a girls’ school in Santiago. We will do the same with Professor Homan’s own production of the internationally famous musical The Threepenny Opera by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill. We will also attend rehearsals and performances, as well as meeting the playwright, of the premier of a new work, The Jesus Spiders of Central Park. And we will attend and then critique two evenings of theatre: “An Evening with William Shakespeare” and “An Evening with Tom Stoppard.” Performance in the scene work and papers assessing the experience with the theatre are required.

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LIT 3374

Bible as Literature

Richard Brantley

The emphasis is on such major genres of the Hebrew Scriptures as narrative, prophecy, poetry, and wisdom literature. The approach is historical and formalistic. Directions for both the midterm and the (non-cumulative) final are as follows: “Identify the following fifteen passages (60 points). Comment on two them (for a total of 60 points). In commenting, take class discussion into account and go beyond it.” Twenty typed, double-spaced pages of critical response are required, though not all at the same time. The text is the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible.

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LIT 4183

Tourism, the Caribbean & Literature

Leah Rosenberg

Documenting the devastating effects of globalization and tourism on the Jamaican economy and autonomy, Stephanie Black’s 2001 film Life and Debt puts in sharp relief the contrast between tourists’ vision of Jamaica and that of Jamaicans in the late 20th century. It reveals the most recent developments in a long cultural and economic history. From Shakespeare’s The Tempest to Terry McMillan’s How Stella Got Her Groove Back and Walt Disney’s The Pirates of the Caribbean, travel and tourism to the Caribbean have been surprisingly prominent and spectacular in European and U.S. culture. This strong and changing image of the Caribbean has in large part been a consequence of the economic position of the Caribbean vis-à-vis first world nations – first a wondrous new world, then a site of slave and sugar factories, now a pleasure destination. Not surprisingly, Caribbean writers have also given a significant place to tourism and travel in their work, often exposing the sharp disjunction between Caribbeans’ experiences and those of tourists. This distinction has become complicated since the late 20th century when the many Caribbeans living outside the region visited their homelands as tourists to carnival and other events like Reggae Sunsplash. This course examines the economic and literary history of tourism in the Caribbean through an analysis of theoretical and literary texts which will likely include works by Shakespeare, Jamaica Kincaid, V.S. Naipaul, Anthony Trollope, Anthony Winkler, Paule Marshall, Terry Mcmillan, Colin Channer, Dean MacCannell, Cynthia Enloe, James Clifford and Kamala Kempadoo.

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LIT 4188

Anglophone Caribbean Novels of Nationhood

Leah Rosenberg

Between 1900 and 1940 national literatures and political nationalism emerged across the British West Indies. Since its emergence, Anglophone Caribbean national literatures have self-consciously produced images of national identity and incorporated cultural practices and historical events in order to do so such as calypso, obeah, legend as well as slave rebellions, labor uprisings, and revolution. This course explores the complex connections between literature, history, and culture. Nationalism in the Caribbean has been largely defined by the fact that whether they chose to immigrate or were forced to by slavery or circumstance, nearly all the peoples of the Caribbean arrived from elsewhere, Africa, Asia, and Europe. Groups from these regions interacted to create Caribbean culture and society. This process of social development has been defined as creolization by many Caribbean intellectuals. Creolization posed a challenge to novelists and nationalists who sought to produce unifying images of their countries. Which groups would be represented in politics and in literature? Which roles would they serve? This course examines Caribbean literature’s engagement with creolization and nationalism throughout the 20th century by placing literary texts in the context of historical events and cultural practices they present such as the Haitian Revolution, carnival, and reggae. Authors will likely include: Kamau, Brathwaite, Nigel Bolland, C.L.R. James, Claude McKay, V.S. Naipaul, Patricia Powell, and Michelle Cliff.

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LIT 4188

World English Language Literature

Roselinde Supheert

Ireland has produced a truly astonishing number of interesting writers and literary highlights. What precisely makes Irish literature Irish is a question that was and is open to debate. This course will provide you with the tools to decide for yourself. It offers a representative survey of twentieth-century Irish prose, poetry and drama in a cultural and historical context. The magnificent new anthology by David Pierce will be our major source. Topics that will be dealt with are the War of Independence and the Irish Revival, the big house, the city and the country, the impact of World War II, the Irish language, the North and gender. Authors include G.B. Shaw, James Joyce, W.B. Yeats, Elizabeth Bowen, Frank O’Connor, Samuel Beckett, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland and Patrick McCabe. Students will be expected to arrive in class prepared to discuss the texts.

Texts:

Format:

Class sessions include lectures, discussions and presentations.

Assessment:

Students will keep a journal in the first half of the course (30%) and will write a research paper in the second half (30%). They will give one presentation (20%). Quizzes and participation will also contribute towards the final grade (20%).

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LIT 4194

African Literature in English: The Drama of Africa

Apollo Amoko

This course will focus on canonical texts of modern African drama. High canonical prose fiction has long dominated the field of African literary studies. In what ways might placing drama center stage alter the critical and theoretical terrain of African letters? In a sense, the high profile enjoyed by the high cultural African novel merely reflects the overall (but perhaps temporary) decline of poetry and drama in contemporary literary studies. But it provides for specific distortions in the African context where the high canonical novel is restricted in its production and circulation to a small intellectual class, what Kwame Anthony Appiah has contemptuously termed the “comprador intelligentsia.” According to Appiah, high cultural African art inhabits and reflects the world of “a relatively small, Western style, Western-trained group of writers and thinkers, who mediate the trade in cultural commodities of world capitalism at the periphery.”

The preoccupations of that rarified academic universe are fundamentally at odds with the practices and politics of everyday life in contemporary Africa. Appiah’s critique seems valid with regard to the high canonical novel but it may not fully account for the instrumental role that performance plays in the dramatic aesthetic. As Simon Gikandi contends plays can perform an important mediating function in contemporary African culture: “Conceived as an instrument for change, drama, more than the novel, could be formalized to overcome the historical and social gap between intellectuals and workers, between popular culture and elite forms of artistic expression.” The course will turn on a critical engagement with Gikandi’s provocative contentions against the backdrop of Appiah’s sweeping critique. We will likely focus on such landmarks in the history of African theater as the First and Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture (the Festac Festivals held in Algiers in 1969 and Lagos in 1977), the various national theater movements established in postcolonial Africa with particular emphasis on the Kenya National Theatre controversy of the 1970s, the Kamiriithu Theatre Experiment, the Popular Theater Movement, the Theatre for Development Movement and the anti-apartheid drama of the Market Theatre (and elsewhere) in South Africa.

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LIT 4322

The Folktale

Robert Thomson

For the purposes of this course, the term folktale will be held to encompass all forms of orally transmitted prose narratives including myths, legends, memorates and wonder-tales. No knowledge of the folktale or of the general field of folklore studies is assumed by the instructor. The first week or so of the course will attempt to orient all students to the place of the folktale in folklore studies. The three required texts have been chosen to give a representative collection of all types of prose narrative. While covering the major aspects of the familiar European tradition the texts will also bring to our attention the ethnic traditions of the United States, particularly the oral narratives recorded from Native Americans in Wisconsin at the turn of the nineteenth/twentieth centuries and African Americans in Eatonville, Florida in the 1920’s and ’30’s. In addition, we will address those issues that have for half a century kept theorists and analysts struggling with the complexities of these “simple forms.”

Texts (available from Goering’s Bookstore):

In addition to the study of tales within the texts above, we will address the following topics:

There will be 3 tests given at roughly three week intervals during the course. In addition two reports, each of about 2500 words will be required. Grades will be based upon the tests (10% each test) the reports (30% each report) and class participation etc.

I will be available on class days between 9.00 and 10.00 am. In addition I can arrange appointments if you phone me at 392-6650, ext267. My office is in Turlington Hall – Rm.4342. Email: <rthomson@english.ufl.edu>.

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LIT 4331

Children’s Literature

James Haskins

The course will examine picture books, board books, counting books, video and audiotapes, as well as a history of each genre, with special emphasis on classism, racism and sexism. Reports on reviewing services and the major awards in children’s literature will be assigned, as well as class discussion and reports on multi-ethnic literature, with emphasis on African American, Asian, Latino and Native American literature.

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LIT 4332

Literature for Young Children

John Cech

This course is meant to be an introduction to and an exploration of the child’s earliest experiences with literature, from birth until his/her first years in school. We will be interested in the relationships between children’s books and oral literature and the imaginative, aesthetic, moral, and psychological growth of their young audiences. The course is designed to involve you actively, analytically, and creatively in the study of this subject. You will be encouraged to develop a first hand sense of how some forms of children’s literature are created; you will be asked to look at works for children with a critical eye; and you will be urged to do your own field work, testing assertions, questions, and ideas that are raised in the course. Literature for Young Children is intended for the children in your classrooms, the children in your home, and the child who still lives somewhere within you.

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LIT 4333

Literature for the Adolescent

Kenneth Kidd

This course examines literature for, by, and about adolescents in the twentieth century, across a range of genres and with attention to the political and social history of adolescence as a concept and as a lived experience. We’ll concentrate on what’s now called “young adult” literature from the 1960s forward, but we will read and discuss that material in light of earlier narrative traditions. The modern adolescent is of course intimately connected to material culture in particular ways; being a so-called “teenager” means watching TV, driving cars, and buying lots of cool stuff. It also means being a social problem, and many of our selections are problem novels in the new realism mode of young adult literature. In this particular section, we will concentrate heavily on contemporary literature in the hopes of assessing what’s happening in young adult publishing and media culture. We’ll probably also screen a teen film and/or episodes of TV programs. The course will be conducted as a seminar and participation is crucial.

Texts (Check with me before you buy books, as titles are subject to change):

Requirements:

Your grade will be determined by your writing and participation, and of course I’ll work closely with you.

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LIT 4333

Adolescent Literature

James Haskins

The course will examine literature appropriate for adolescent and young adult audiences, with special emphasis on the sociopolitical and psychological interpretations of the various genres. Genres to be explored will include nonfiction, historical and modern fiction, and literature for the young-adult audience dealing with contemporary themes of interest, as well as the problem novel. Issues such as censorship, religious themes, intercultural and interracial dating, abortion, and substance abuse will be discussed. Group discussions will be emphasized, and individuals as well as groups of students will be assigned reports and asked to lead class discussions on authors and book topics.

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LIT 4483

Post-History & Visual Culture

Scott Nygren

This is an experimental course in Media and Cultural Studies, an area in the process of being invented. The course will consider film and the visual arts in relation to a rethinking of history in a postmodern context. Film and Media Studies intersects here with Cultural Studies, as an approach to visual representations and their social, political and psychological contexts and effects.

A postmodern rethinking of history, or post-history in a word, reconfigures history as a frontier and laboratory, rather than as a set of materials imagined as if fixed, already known, and obsolete. History in these terms questions disciplinary boundaries, chronological sequence and familiar narratives in order to investigate the often unconscious assumptions that drive the information environment that we now inhabit. A point of departure will be Lyotard’s argument that determining figures inhabit media discourses, that shape their possibilities and limits, and that we can best approach these figural assumptions by way of visual media and the arts.

Accordingly, we will look at a series of engagements between the visual arts and cinema, linking together disparate periods and disciplines, in order to better understand the operation and effects of visual discourses that surround us today. One such engagement will be the relation of cubism to early cinema, as a theoretical response in visual terms that helps us unravel the implications and effects of moving images. Another will be the question of what classicism means in relation to “Classic Hollywood Cinema,” which we will approach by way of Maya Deren’s avant-garde films, the Japanese theorist Kojin Karatani’s work on “Architecture as Metaphor,” and the role of Neoclassicism in the European and American traditions. We will then consider a series of links across historical periods informed by theoretical readings from Lyotard and Deleuze, including the early Renaissance in relation to avant-garde film, baroque imaging and Peter Greenaway’s digital layering, Asian landscape scrolls and Japanese films, Byzantine anti-realist representation and the politics of video, and so on.

Students will be asked to similarly experiment with history and media, and will read Daniel Milo’s “Toward an Experimental History” to guide the process. The issue is not always a ‘correct’ reading, in the sense of a single, absolute, essential truth of a text, but a serious if playful engagement on methodological terms nonetheless, which may vary, conflict and contest with others. These engagements may take the form of a paper, a project, or one of each, for a total of two during the semester.

Books will include

Capstone

This course will include an optional Capstone segment for one additional credit, as a week of intensive study in Paris during spring break, March 5–13. The Capstone will provide a rare opportunity to study this densely layered urban environment as a model for historical thought. For further information, contact Scott Nygren at <nygren@ufl.edu>, or Gayle Zachmann of the Paris Research Center at <gzachuf@aol.com> or Barbara Dyer of the France Florida Research Institute at <bhdyer@rll.ufl.edu>.

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LIT 4930

Introduction to Queer Theory

Kim Emery

A general introduction to major concerns, methodologies, and texts in queer theory, this course offers tools useful in the investigation of cultural organizations of gender, sex, and sexuality. Students will read widely in the field and be asked to consider various approaches to difficult questions about historicity, nature, privacy, consent, and the political implications of diverse sexual representations and practices. More than simply the study of theory (i.e., of other people’s theories), however, the class is an incitement to theorize.

Readings will be drawn from founding texts by theorists such as Michel Foucault, John D’Emilio, Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, and Gayle Rubin. Thorough preparation and active engagement will be required of all participants, along with two exams, two formal papers, a class presentation, and frequent shorter, informal assignments, both in and outside of class.

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LIT 4930

Advertising & Culture

James Twitchell

Although there are courses in advertising and advertisements, this course attempts to chart the history of a culture – our popular culture – as it has been defined and conveyed by commercial speech. We will discuss the history and changing definition of advertising; the effects of commercial discourse on our sense of self, time, and place; and essentially argue that advertising has become, like religion, one of the primary institutions of our “sociosphere.” The course is not a criticism but an exploration. “Advertising and Culture” is not a course intended to teach advertising techniques and practices to professional or pre-professional students.

Texts

Requirements

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LIT 4930

Shakespeare’s Theater of Likeness

R. Allen Shoaf

In the more than 40 works he wrote in roughly 20 years, Shakespeare uses the word like and various forms thereof nearly 2400 times (he uses imitate and forms thereof 22 times). With this word, his native English word that derives from the Anglo-Saxon word for “body,” he examines as he dramatizes one of the inescapable questions of human being: what shall I (be) like? When, for example, King Henry V asks Katherine of France, “Do you like me, Kate?” her response serves, in effect, as a figure of the ontological condition of the Shakespearean protagonist – “Pardonnez moi, I cannot tell vat is ‘like me’ “ (Henry V 5.2.107–8). Though, obviously, she means she has trouble understanding the English words “like me,” she also says, what every Shakespearean protagonist also says at one time or another, I do not know what I (am) like.

“Shakespeare’s Theater of Likeness” will study a wide range of the writings (plays and poems both) with a view to devising a method for analyzing and expressing the work of the word like in the corpus. In the process, a number of other methods – psychoanalytic criticism, “new historicism,” and “WerkImmanente Bedeutung” (“work-immanent meaning”), to name a few – will also be studied and tested.

Each student will be responsible for reporting on the work of like in one play and for writing two short essays, one based on the report, and another, at the end of the term, on a related topic of his or her own choosing.

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SPC 3605

Speechwriting

Ron Carpenter

Speechwriting is an advanced composition course. In SPC 3605, students acquire stylistic prowess by which their sentences have increased potential for memorability and quotability, ease and accuracy of comprehension, as well as overall persuasiveness. The course is called Speechwriting because models of eloquence to be imitated are in sentences of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, John Kennedy, and Martin Luther King, Jr., for examples. Although you practice these stylistic skills while writing speeches, the acquired prowess is applicable in virtually any future communication endeavors, as speakers or writers, regardless of profession.

SPC 3605 is not about supporting arguments or organizing them into broader discourse. If you seek those skills, other courses are more appropriate. Speechwriting is about how to select the best words and arrange them in their best orders—within sentences—to achieve optimal impress of your ideas upon readers or listeners. These stylistic skills are practiced and perfected in drafts that you aloud among peers (and for me) during our “lab” periods, wherein you should acquire a refined sense of how to achieve the final product desired at the semester end. Thus, present drafts when due; listen carefully to other students’ drafts, comparing yours with theirs; participate in rewriting others’ sentences; and heed my commentary about all drafts. Do not assume that “participation” means simply presenting your drafts and listening only to commentary about them.

How a draft is presented, vocally and physically, has no bearing on your grade (for help with delivery skills other courses are appropriate; I may make suggestions about how to improve your platform presence, however). The important point is that Speechwriting is an advanced composition course, wherein you read drafts aloud as bases of discussion by which all students understand how and why some sentences are better than others. For initial and final drafts, I require word processing available in computer labs on campus (if you do not have your own computer). Revision on your disk is easier; spelling is accurate; and word lengths of drafts are known.

From past experience, I know that reasonably diligent students achieve a substantial measure of the stylistic skills taught in this course. Final grades are higher, however, as you (1) demonstrate refined prowess as the competent stylist on exams and in final drafts, (2) understand course precepts derived from readings and lecture materials, as tested by exams during the semester (the course has no final exam), and (3) produce a final research paper about style as defined in this course (research paper options will be explained during a lecture relatively early in the semester and will require additional library reading). Final grades are determined one–half by the average of your exam scores and one–half by the quality of your final notebook with polished drafts of speeches and the research paper—all typed, double-spaced, and turned in during exam week at the time and date listed in the University Timetable as the course final exam period. The textbook for the course is Ronald H. Carpenter, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works; it can be purchased at Goerings’ Book Store at Bageland.

Although this is a writing course, I also am impressed—for grading purposes—by how much you know about style as defined in this class. Please appreciate the fact that this composition course is unlike virtually all other persuasive writing courses at the University of Florida, for the expertise and confidence in the precepts being taught are derived from your instructor’s own published research in four scholarly press books, several book chapters, and numerous research journal articles (all of which informed my writing of your textbook). Furthermore, from my experience as a communications consultant for organizations outside the university (such as corporate executives, lawyers, civic leaders, hospital administrators, public relations professionals, and officers attending the U.S. Naval War College), I know that skills taught in this course are useful in the “real” world.

In conclusion, teaching you to be eloquent stylists gives me great personal satisfaction. For I can make positive changes in your behaviors as communicators. If you join me in this endeavor, which admittedly entails some substantial effort on your part, I promise you will acquire valuable skills that will be admired by others as well as be useful for the rest of your life, no matter what your later profession might be. The only prerequisite for the course is that you can write grammatical sentences that are punctuated correctly.

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SPC 4680

Rhetorical Criticism: Masterpeices of Rhetoric

Ron Carpenter

During the Spring Semester, 2004, Rhetorical Criticism has as its focus several “masterpieces of rhetoric.” Although several of these are in the realm of political and presidential discourse, another focus this semester will be upon rhetorical efforts to persuade Americans to engage in armed conflict with other nations. Thus, students will examine how some speakers, writers, and film makers appealed successfully to specific attitudes and actions with profound influence upon the course of events. The goal of the course is to provide students will a refined sense of some rhetorical principles and techniques by which their own future discourse is more effective persuasively. Please note: “rhetoric” is not a pejorative word. In its current and inaccurate usage, the word often is prefaced with the adjective “empty” to disparage what “other” people say or write ostensibly as groundless emotional appeal in contradistinction to discourse that presumably only “tells it like it is.” But accurately, “rhetoric” refers to those means by which discourse “adjusts ideas to people and people to ideas.” So rhetoric is the art of persuasion, and rhetorical criticism identifies and assesses what was done with words (and other factors) to achieve persuasion.

Students will write six short papers (2-3 typed pages) that summarize and expand briefly upon assigned readings, films, or group projects (one of these must be the enthymemic persuasion of me). I will accept these papers co-signed by all group members that participated. A longer final paper (8–10 typed pages) will report individual library research about some topic suggested by the course (the focus of that paper must be developed in consultation with me). The course will have a “take home” final exam. Please understand that your group projects will require meetings with your student peers outside regular class periods. Students also are required to view some films outside of class. The textbook is Halford Ryan, Contemporary American Public Discourse: A Collection of Speeches and Critical Essays. It is available at Goerings Book Store, next to Bageland.

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