Undergraduate Courses, Spring 2005

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Upper Division (3000–4000) Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

AML 4242

The American Nightmare: Race, Place, Gender and Family in American Horror After World War II

Robin Nicks

What cultural work does American horror perform? In this course we will begin with Jane Tompkins’ assertion that “novels and stories should be studied not because they manage to escape the limitations of their particular time and place, but because they offer powerful examples of the way a culture thinks about itself.” Employing various literary theories (Marxist, feminist, post-colonial, etc.) we will examine the messages that horror texts offer about race, place, gender, and the family in the second half of the twentieth century. We will explore both novels and film, with a horror comic thrown in the mix, and we’ll discuss how form affects message.

Written assignments include a midterm exam, a final research project, quizzes and various homework assignments. In addition to the primary texts we’re discussing, we will read historical and theoretical texts, and you should be prepared to connect these secondary readings to the fiction, as well as offer your own interpretations of our texts.

Texts include:

toptop

AML 4242

Modernity and Money

Stephanie A. Smith

Ezra Pound’s modernist injunction, “Make it new,” situates the whole so-called modernist project as a response/rejection of the past, and yet, of course, that past is a condition of novelty: to make a new object, something people will buy – and sets limits to the modernist project. In fact, the question of whether or not a distinctly American literature could arise in a country where making a buck was more important than self-realization, compassion, understanding or community was an anxious question of anticipated failure and has haunted American writings. To lack an accesible “American” voice would be to fail, but without transcending crass, popular American standards, one also fails to be properly literary.

In this course, we will re-examine the so-called modernist project as one deeply implicated in the construction of a nationalist and capitalist identity, and so limited by its own imperatives.

Requirements will include a mid-term project and a final paper.

Required readings will include works by Herman Melville, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, Jean Toomer, and Sylvia Plath.

toptop

AML 4242

Hollywood and the Novel

Susan Hegeman

This course is for advanced English majors interested in American literature and its relationship to film, cultural studies, and theory. In the class, we will explore the challenge that the emergence and eventual global influence of American popular movies presented to practitioners of an older art form, the novel. For some novelists, the popular influence of movies and the success of the film industry represented a frightening degradation of culture. For others, movies offered an exciting new vocabulary and subject matter, and new possibilities for intertextuality and experimenting with the novel’s form. We will address both social and aesthetic questions related to the emergence of the film industry. Though this is primarily a course on the American novel, we will also be viewing films and discussing the adaptation and use of “literary” materials in film.

Assigned novels may include

Films may include

Students will also be expected to read historical and theoretical essays related to the course material.

Grades will be based upon class participation and three take-home exams.

toptop

AML 4282

Race and Ethnicity in Film

Amy Abugo Ongiri

Visual culture has long defined that which is not white, not queer, and not male as deviant from the visual norm. This course will explore the way in which film culture has traditionally positioned people it defines as deviant from the racial, ethnic, gender or sexual norm and the ways in which filmmakers have responded to that positioning. We will begin by examining the ways in which characters of color have been positioned within a history of visual representation in US culture and look at how this reflects the construction of racial norms in a wider context as well. We will give particular attention to the ways in which constructions of characters viewed as deviant have operated to contain the potential social, political and cultural threat they are assumed to pose. We will then explore the consequences of normative and deviant positioning for questions of identification, spectatorship, subversive aesthetics, and filmic fantasy. Particular attention will be given to the ways in which a discourse of racial deviance interacts with a discourse of sexual deviance. The films we will examine range from international films, experimental short films to feature length Hollywood and independent films. We utilize the work of Manthia Diawara, Kaja Silverman, Laura Mulvey, Trinh T. Minh-Ha, Essex Hemphill, Sander Gilman, Marlon Riggs and bell hooks among others.

toptop

AML 4311

Major Author: Philip Roth

Andrew Gordon

Philip Roth is one of the most accomplished American novelists since WW II. He has been publishing fiction for over forty years and garnered popular attention, major literary awards, critical praise, and fierce condemnation. He is best known as the author of the controversial Portnoy’s Complaint (1969), but he has written many other innovative novels. Even as he continued to focus on Jewish-American male identity in the period since World War II, he has grown from realist to postmodernist, conducting daring explorations across the boundary lines between fact and fiction, investigating both “real life” and the stories we construct about it and live by.

Goals:

We will consider Roth in a number of contexts: as Jewish-American author, as American author, as writer about contemporary sexuality, as realist, and as metafictionist.

This course aims to improve your understanding of post-WW II American fiction, American gender identity, and Jewish-American culture through extensive reading and writing about the works of a single major author.

Readings:

Requirements:

  1. Attendance and participation.
  2. Ten short response papers (one page each) to the readings.
  3. Two longer papers:
  1. One oral report to the class.

Summary:

Note: There will be no midterm or final exam.

toptop

AML 4453

American Protest Literature

Patricia Schmidt

This course explores the period of American history during which boundaries of propriety were challenged, new tolerance for individual rights blossomed, and Robert Kennedy’s plaintiff question “Will the center hold?” aptly captured both the rate and intensity of social change. Through novels such as Catch 22 and One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, selected films, as well as various works of non-fiction, we shall probe for the underlying factors that fueled the period. The course will require a long research paper, as well as shorter and more personal papers that will provide the opportunity for synthesis and reflection.

toptop

AML 4453

The Novel in the Early Republic

Emily Garcia

The publication of novels written by U.S. authors increased immensely after the adoption of the Constitution. The passage of a federal Copyright Act in 1790 further influenced the composition and distribution of novels in the U.S.

In this course we will read six novels that speak to the anxieties and complexities of the early republic. We will pay attention to style and form (the novels emerge from the gothic, picaresque and sentimental traditions) as well as notions of early American identity. Readings will address questions of authorship, the history of the book, political discourse, print culture, citizenship, personal freedom, and the cultures of American Indians, slaves and women in the republic.

Despite their historical and social implications, class discussions and assignments will always be grounded in the process of close reading, reading that is rigorous and yet subtle. The course aims to develop each student’s ability to conduct such reading and express it coherently and persuasively.

Assignments and discussions will most often concern short passages in a text; arguments will evolve from the comparison of several passages or from the situation of a passage (or passages) in a critical framework. We will read one novel every two weeks. Some critical essays (available on reserve) will also be assigned.

Required Texts (in order of the reading schedule):

Texts will be available at Wild Iris Books, 375-7477.

Assignments and Grading:

Attendance policy: Each unexcused absence after four will lower your final grade by one step (a B becomes a B- for example).

Feel free to email me at <egarcia@clas.ufl.edu> if you would like more information about the course.

toptop

AML 4453

American Immigrant Literature

Alison Van Nyhuis

This special topics course on American literature and culture will focus on providing some answers to the question “What is American Immigrant Literature?”– that is, who is an “American,” what is “ America,” what is “immigrant literature,” and what are the specific problems and concerns associated with identifying a literary tradition associated with American immigrants? The course will primarily focus on 20th century literature written by Caribbean-born authors, such as Claude McKay and Christina Garcia. The first part of the course will focus on writers’ treatment of the American Dream and the concept of Diaspora. The second part of the course will also focus on writers’ presentation of the American Nightmare. The assigned contextual and theoretical material should enhance analyses of the fictional works.

toptop

AML 4453

Reading Popular Texts for Women

Rochelle Mabry

No course description is available at this time.

toptop

CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

Mary Robison

No course description is available at this time.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For LIT 4930, submit one of the following: a memoir, personal essay, or short story (5–10 pp.)

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by October 15, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

toptop

CRW 3110

Reading and Writing Short Stories

David Leavitt

What is a short story? No genre has so consistently eluded definition. Stories can range from eighty pages (Thomas Mann’s “Death in Venice”) to a single sentence (Amy Hempel’s “Housewife”). The purpose of this seminar will be to explore the parameters of this seductive and evasive form, from the standpoint both of the practitioner and the reader.

The seminar will be built around the idea that writers learn by reading. Therefore you may find the reading load heavier than is typical for a fiction workshop. Each week you will be asked to read a selection of stories by an English or American writer, and to arrive in class prepared to discuss them cogently. This conversation will take up roughly a third of our allotted time; the other two-thirds will be devoted to discussion of your own work (presented according to a pre-arranged schedule) and occasional in-class exercises.

For the first several weeks, I’ll be giving you assignments of a vaguely experimental nature – for instance, to tell a story from the viewpoint of an historical figure of your own choosing (Janis Joplin, Jack the Ripper). You’ll then set to work on stories of your own devising, which may have evolved from these exercises. The requirement of the class, in terms of writing, is that you complete two stories, the first by midterm and the second by term’s end. (The second may be an outgrowth of the first.) It goes without saying that attendance is mandatory, and that failure to show up (along with failure to do the reading) will have an adverse effect on your final grade. Grading will be based on your informed participation in the seminar, the critical acuity you show when judging other students’ writing, and your willingness to work hard: to be the best writer you can be, and to emerge at the end of the semester a better writer than you were at the beginning.

The reading many include stories by John Cheever, William Trevor, Barry Hannah, Denis Johnson, Flannery O’Connor, Grace Paley, Deborah Eisenberg, Allan Gurganus, Amy Hempel and W.G. Sebald.

Final note: although flexibility is essential to any writing workshop, so is structure. The same can be said – and must be said – of the writing process.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For LIT 4930, submit one of the following: a memoir, personal essay, or short story (5–10 pp.)

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by October 15, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

toptop

CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

Jill Ciment

This course will be run in the ‘traditional’ workshop fashion with occasional lectures on structure, metaphor, plot, etc. Writing exercises will be assigned at the beginning, but the primary emphasis is on self-generated work. Each student will be expected to write two short stories, as well as complete a final draft of each.

Optimally, students will turn in stories that they have taken as far as they can on their own. The workshop should be a venue to test the waters, to try new things, to present first drafts as well as polished works, but only after the writer has struggled with it to the nth degree. The idea is for students to rigorously challenge themselves. Everyone not presenting work should take their jobs as critics and editors as seriously as they take their own writing.

Reading will be assigned.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For LIT 4930, submit one of the following: a memoir, personal essay, or short story (5–10 pp.)

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by October 15, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

toptop

CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry

Michael Hofmann

No course description is available at this time.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For LIT 4930, submit one of the following: a memoir, personal essay, or short story (5–10 pp.)

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by October 15, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

toptop

CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry

Brandon Kershner

Text: The only text for this course is Ellmann and O’Clair’s Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, the latest edition. It is available at Goering’s Bookstore.

Mechanics: The course is essentially a workshop; that is, the emphasis will be upon improving your own creative work. You are expected to turn in a poem of moderate length (say 1/2 page, typed in dark ink on white paper) or a substantially rewritten version of an earlier poem each week during class, to be discussed during the following week’s class. Submit the poems to my mailbox (TUR 4012) before 4:00 on the Friday preceding class. About half of these poems will be prescribed exercises. You may, if you wish, turn in several poems each week; in fact, I encourage this. Failure to turn in your work when it is due will adversely affect your grade.

From among the submissions each week I will prepare a worksheet of poems to be discussed during the next class. You must purchase this worksheet at University Copy, across from campus, before class. I will expect you to annotate the poems you read with questions, comments, suggestions, and so forth, before class begins. There should be enough of these so that everyone would have plenty to say if called upon. Of course, you will also be expected to have looked up words of whose meaning you are unsure and allusions with which you are not familiar. Although not everyone’s poem will be discussed each week, I will try to ensure that everyone’s work appears regularly. I prefer that each poem be discussed before the author is identified; only after discussion has finished will the author be identified and allowed to respond to the comments or questions. In any case, I will make written comments on the original submitted copies of everyone’s poems each week. Save these copies; I will want to see them at midterm, when I will meet with everyone to give an assessment of your progress in the course, and again at the end of the term. If you have a particular reason to request that the poem you turn in for a particular week not be discussed in class, or be discussed anonymously, please make a note to that effect on the poem you turn in to me.

In the first half of class we will discuss poems by the writers assigned for that week, and we will discuss the particular writing assignment or exercise (if any) for the following week. You should be familiar with the poems from Ellmann and O’Clair assigned that week; unless I state otherwise, read all the selections for each poet. Your own work will be a mixture of specific assignments (sonnet, sestina, sustained metaphor) and open assignments.

Absences: You are allowed two absences, which must be cleared in advance with me; call me at the office or at home. Any uncleared absence (including lateness over 1/2 hour) lowers your grade by half a letter. If you miss a class, your work for the following week should still be in my box in the English Department by Friday afternoon.

Grades: I will try to give you an idea of the grade you might expect (assuming you continue working at the same level) when we meet around midterm; at the end of term I will collect from you a notebook with copies of all your work, including my comments, and your own revisions of whichever poems you wish. The more poems you revise successfully, the more positively I am impressed. There are no papers and no exams. Your final grade will be determined by the quality and/or improvement in your writing; by your attendance and participation in class; and by the wit, passion, and seriousness you bring to writing. My quantification of these elements may be somewhat subjective.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For LIT 4930, submit one of the following: a memoir, personal essay, or short story (5–10 pp.)

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by October 15, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

toptop

CRW 4905

Advanced Seminar in Fiction Writing

Mary Robison

No course description is available at this time.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For LIT 4930, submit one of the following: a memoir, personal essay, or short story (5–10 pp.)

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by October 15, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

toptop

CRW 4906

Senior Advanced Seminar in Poetry Writing

William Logan

“Just as the civilization of the Kelts is revealed to us by their dolmens, and that of the Scandinavians by their mounds and kitchen-middens, so will the antiquaries of future times immediately recognise the spots inhabited in India by the English by the piles of soda-water bottles heaped up before the cantonments, and the dwellings of the Americans by their deposits of empty meat tins.”

– Edmond Baron de Mandat-Grancey, Cow-Boys and Colonels, 1887

Poetry must be about hells and heavens, hills and halls, hopscotch and hiphop, and empty meat tins. We will be looking in language for the equivalent of things felt and seen. You will seek this in the words used by other poets, and those you invent for yourself. Be prepared to read until your eyes hurt, to write a dozen poems (one per week), and to find your poems criticized. Each week the workshop will discuss your work and the work of your predecessors.

This is Florida’s most advanced workshop in poetry, for students who hope to become poets and possibly attend an MFA program – or those who have merely developed an obsessive and perverse interest in writing. Students from this class have gone on to The University of Iowa, University of Virginia, Columbia University, University of Michigan, and other programs. Email submissions accepted.

Required reading:

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For LIT 4930, submit one of the following: a memoir, personal essay, or short story (5–10 pp.)

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by October 15, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

toptop

ENC 3254

Professional Writing in the Discipline

Instructor Varies (call 392–5421)

Except for 2 sections that are reserved for Education majors, this course is offered out of the Dial Center for Written and Oral Communication. N.B.: English majors should be aware that because the UF Undergraduate Catalog defines the requirement for the English major as ten courses “offered by the department,” the sections of ENC 3254 offered by the Dial Center for Written and Oral Communication cannot be counted toward the major.

toptop

ENC 3310

Advanced Exposition

Wayne Losano

This is a standard, traditional (old-fashioned) composition course focusing on familiar rhetorical modes of development (narrative, description, analysis, etc.) with a heavy emphasis on style and rhetorical effectiveness and perhaps a nod towards “creative nonfiction.” Grammatical competence will be assumed although helped along a bit as necessary. The course is primarily intended for those who plan to teach writing or who will need to write as part of their graduate or professional studies or their later careers. It is not, however, as immediately practical as Professional Communication (ENC 3250) for those considering positions in industry. Usually five papers are required along with analysis of selected essays and assorted in-class writing activities.

toptop

ENC 3310

Honors: Advanced Exposition

Marie Nelson

No course description is available at this time.

toptop

ENC 3312

Advanced Argumentative Writing

Patricia Schmidt

One purpose of this course is to develop skills which will enable you to frame arguments which carry real weight and to develop confidence in deciding the strength of arguments made by others. To do so requires us to be able to demonstrate clearly the reasons for our beliefs and cogency of logical inference.

What we are “about” is more than that, however. In the words of Wayne C. Booth and Marshall W. Gregory, the authors of the text we shall use for the course, “we are moral agents attempting to do something in or to the world.” Thus, it is hoped that in addition to skills, this course will nourish the quality of thought which underlies good writing through readings selected for the course and through class discussions.

Robert Maynard Hutchins tells a story which nicely addresses the need for this second loftier goal:

My father came home from India about thirty years ago with the story of a British woman who was plagued to death by the questions of her Indian servant. Finally she said to him, ‘Why don’t you use your common sense?’ He replied, ‘Lady, common sense is the gift of God; I have only a technical education.’

Argumentation is a good deal more than a skill. The rhetorical assumptions which undergird it comprise a habit of mind. The course will be informed by an exploration of those rhetorical assumptions.

Texts

Requirements

Papers must be typed and double spaced with title pages. A bibliography and footnotes (or endnotes) should be used where appropriate. If the paper is late, its grade drops one letter grade for every day late. Staple or clip the pages. No binder or covers, please.

This is a demanding course so be prepared to work.

toptop

ENC 3414

Hypermedia

Greg Ulmer

ENC 3414 treats the World Wide Web in particular, and the internet in general, as an object of study worthy of the same critical and theoretical attention as that given to cinema and television. We will be concerned not only with the new forms of art and entertainment emerging online, but also with the internet as a new “public sphere,” a new site in which citizens participate in the making of collective as well as of personal meaning and identity. We will gain some perspective by placing the invention of the web in the context of the cultural transformations associated with film and print (the screen and the page). The projects for the semester focus on the similarity among the features of digital media, creative thinking, and entertainment narratives. ENC 3414 is taught in a computerized classroom, and all assignments involve making websites. No previous experience with computing (other than word processing) is required.

toptop

ENC 4956

Overseas Studies

Undergraduate Coordinator

Prerequisite: This course must be approved by the Undergraduate Coordinator before the student travels overseas. It may be repeated with a change of topic up to a maximum of 15-credit hours.

This study, which may count towards the English major, involves course work taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

toptop

ENG 3011

Theorists: Jacques Derrida

Julian Wolfreys

Jacques Derrida is one of the most important thinkers of the twentieth century. Amongst so many other subjects, his writings, his lectures, his teaching and his involvement in a number of political causes have transformed the ways in which literature can has been taught and the ways in which some of us read and write. However, for as much as Derrida’s writing and thinking appear to have been received in the humanities and social sciences over the past 40 years, there is also the sense that he has not yet been received; he has been resisted, and, in some examples, reviled. The reception and non-reception of Derrida’s writing raises for us a double question, from which this semester’s course will depart and to which it will return repeatedly: what takes place in this scene of writing and in what ways can we open ourselves to receiving this scene and bearing witness to its operations? With these interrogations in mind, and bearing also in mind their inexhaustible, possibly unanswerable condition, we will proceed to pull at certain threads from the vast text of Derrida, exploring in only the most adumbrated fashion the contours of what might be called his thinking and writing.

Course reading:

A photocopy packet of additional material will also be available.

Course Requirements: Three essays 60 %; in-class participation 40%.

toptop

ENG 3063

Advanced Grammar: Theory & Application

Wayne Losano

This course is intended primarily for students planning to be writing teachers or professional editors and who will need to know essential terminology and reasons for grammatical changes to enhance their credibility as teachers and editors. We will cover as many aspects of formal grammar as we can cram into one semester, covering topics ranging from parts of speech and sentence patterns to diagramming, modification, and rhetorical grammar. No exams or major papers are required but some work – take-home or in-class exercises, editing work, reading tests, etc. will be required for every class and the final grade will be based simply on the success of these accumulated activities.

toptop

ENG 3122

History of Film 2

Nora Alter

The second half of the Film History survey begins with the introduction of sound film and extends through the present. We will begin with the way in which sound becomes a significant component in the structuring of narrative. From there we will examine two different systems of film production in the 1930sand 1940s: European and American Cinema. In particular we will focus on films made by directors who had experience working in both systems. The next part of the course will examine various “new waves” of European filmmaking and the emergence of American independent cinema in the 1950 and 19960s. Finally we will conclude with an examination of Non-western films and the development of “Third Cinema” as an alternative that challenges previously dominant modes of production.

toptop

ENG 4015

Psychological Approaches to Literature

Peter L. Rudnytsky

Did Freud have an affair with his sister-in-law, Minna Bernays? We will consider this controversial question, and its implications for the history of psychoanalysis, in light of the available evidence. Readings will include some or all of the following:

Course requirements are a midterm, final, one 8–12 page paper, and a weekly diary.

toptop

ENG 4060

History of the English Language

Kevin McCarthy

The objective of the course is to study the origins and development of the English language, from Indo-European times to the present. We will study the syntax, pronunciation, semantics, and morphology of the language as it has evolved to the present.

Requirements: 4 tests, each worth 25% of the final grade.

toptop

ENG 4110

Animation and Comics

Donald Ault

The class on animation, comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels will meet two periods each day, three days a week, a time-format that should allow video projection screenings and same-day discussions of images and theoretical and historical texts. The format will be kept open-ended throughout the semester.

Requirements: essays, quizzes, productive class participation, and a final project.

Required Text: Course Packet (Xerographic Copy Center, 927 N.W. 13th Street). More may be added.

toptop

ENG 4110

Steven Spielberg

Andrew Gordon

Steven Spielberg is one of the most popular and influential filmmakers in the world today, both as director and producer. Over more than 30 years, there have been many Spielbergs: the Boy Wonder who made blockbuster fantasy adventures such as Jaws, Close Encounters, and Raiders of the Lost Ark; the poet of the suburbs who brought warmth to the science fiction film with E.T.; serious Spielberg, who adapted prizewinning novels and historical dramas to the screen for The Color Purple, Schindler’s List, and Amistad; and, most recently, Spielberg the journeyman director, stretching to try various genres, including the combat film (Saving Private Ryan), the crime drama (Catch Me If You Can), and romantic comedy (The Terminal). He has been both praised as a director of enormous skill and visual flair, a natural storyteller able to entertain and to move mass audiences, and criticized as a slick and shallow popularizer.

Goals: We will consider Spielberg as a major American director who has learned from masters such as Ford, Hawks, Hitchcock, Capra, and Kubrick.. We will consider the development of his career and style and look at some of his persistent themes, such as the ordinary man in extraordinary circumstances, the lost child, and the troubled family. This course should give you a better understanding of American film and American culture.

Films:

Readings:

Requirements:

toptop

ENG 4133

Getting Medieval on Film

Richard Burt

This course will use Monty Python’s Holy Grail (and related films by co-directors Terry Jones and Terry Gilliam) and The Name of the Rose (along with writings about the Middle Ages by Umberto Eco) as competing ways of examining films about the Middle Ages in relation to three key terms: authenticity, anachronism, and allegory. Monty Python’s Holy Grail and The Name of the Rose will serve as two (unstable) poles for discussion, the former tending toward nonsense, childishness, paratextual effects, and allegorical emptiness and the latter tending toward the detection of significance, clues, maturity, palimpsestic depths, and allegorical plenitude. Setting these poles in dialectical opposition and taking into account their self-deconstructing dynamics (surface nonsense becomes deep critique in Holy Grail while Holmesian detection leads to postmodern, labyrithine libraries and book burning in Name of the Rose), we will consider what authenticity means in film, why it is valued, whether it is desirable or even possible. Along similar lines we will consider the multiple facets of historical anachronism (comedy, parody, paratextual effects, palimpsestic traces, topical criticism) and various dreams or allegories of the Middle ages (most often as the age of superstition, sorcery, dirt, and barbarism, or as the age of chivalry, romance, magic, and courtesy). Selected readings from Getting Medieval, The Shock of the Medieval, A Knight at the Movies, The Reel Middle Ages, Cinema Arthuriana, and essays by Stuart Airlie, David Williams, Umberto Eco, Carlo Ginzburg, and Vivien Sobchack, among others. Ranging across a wide of variety of film genres and national cinemas, the films we’ll see complete or in part include Monty Python’s Holy Grail, The Name of the Rose, Braveheart, A Knight’s Tale, Alexander Nevsky, The Navigator, Timeline, Sorceress, The Passion of Beatrice, The Crusades, Andrei Rublev, Les Visiteurs, Just Visiting, Les Visiteurs du Soir, Henry V, The Seventh Seal, The Canterbury Tales, Perceval le Gaullois, El Cid, The Adventures Robin Hood, The Passion of Joan of Arc, The Messenger, Knights of the Round Table, Excalibur, Anazapta, Seven, The 13th Warrior, Kagemusha, Anchoress, The Advocate, The Reckoning, and King Arthur. Some readings will be available online through WebCT at <http://webct.ufl.edu/>. The course website is at <http://www.clas.ufl.edu/~rburt/middleagesonfilm/>.

toptop

ENG 4133

Trash Cinema: Questions of Popular Production and Reception

Amy Abugo Ongiri

This course will explore questions of popular production and reception through a focus on “trash cinema.” “Trash cinema” usually designates film that is made quickly, cheaply or by amateur filmmakers often with the expressed goal of generating revenue by satisfying popular tastes for images and themes that mainstream cinema refuses. We will explore several subgenres of exploitation film, including sexploitation and blaxploitation as well as trash cinema in more traditional categories such as horror, action, science fiction and westerns. Films may include Nudes on the Moon, Sweet Sweetback’s Badass Song!, Enter the Dragon, and Faster Pussycat Kill! Kill! among others. Our examination of these films will be informed by the critical theory of Linda Williams, Carol Clover, Mikita Brotman, Ed Guerrero, Steve Neale, Stephen Prince, Vivian Sobchack, and David Bordwell among others.

toptop

ENG 4135

Points of Contact: Turkish, German, and Turkish-German Cinema

Barbara Mennel

By the time that young Turkish-German director Fatih Akin received the Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival in 2004 for his film Head-On, a generation of Turkish-German filmmakers had been making successful films for a decade in Germany. This course therefore addresses the following questions: What are the points of contact and comparison between Turkish and German cinema? How have West German films of the 1970s represented the “guest workers” from Turkey? How do themes of migration and globalization shape a new cinema in Germany and in Turkey? The course offers an introduction to film analysis, brief surveys of Turkish and German national cinemas, an overview of contemporary Turkish-German films, and a theoretical discussion of minority discourse in Germany.

toptop

ENG 4135

Cinema and Jews

Maureen Turim

(This course is cross-listed with JST 3930/sec. 1660)

The focus of this course will be on three different types of fictional films of Jewish peoples: first, Yiddish cinema prior to World War II, secondly, on cinema’s exploration of the Holocaust, and thirdly, on Israeli cinema. As such the course will trace Jewish expression of selfhood, diversity and community during a period from the Thirties through the present. Issues of the ethnic cultures of Judaism, of the Diaspora, assimilation, anti-semitism, oppression, attempted annihilation, emigration and the formation of a Jewish State (and its internal conflicts as well as conflicts with other nations) will be explored as they emerge in narrative films. What stories do Jews create in the images and sounds of their cinema? Both Ashkenasic (the diasporic Jews of Europe) and Sephardic (the Mediteranean and Middle-eastern Jews) cultures will be explored, as will conflicts upon cohabitation in Israel. Although US Jewish culture will form one frame of reference, this course will not specifically focus on the history of Jews in US films, a course of study in its own right. The films we will see are shaped by traditions of theatrical performance, music, philosophy that combine to create various film aesthetics often rich in humor, style, and dramatic confrontation as they research questions of meaning and identity. Cinema represents for Jews a confrontation with iconography, with images and visual symbols, to which a culture traditionally of the word must adapt. As images have so often been used to caricature Jews, the question of imagistic creation becomes one of a struggle with stereotypes supplied by others, as well as with a traditional iconoclasm and visual reserve. In addition, these films provide a means of critical examination of how Jews have looked at others, particularly how Israeli Jews look at Palestinian Arabs.

This course will be of prime interest to students of Judaic studies, but no prior familiarity with Judaic studies will be assumed. Film, Cultural Studies and Literature majors, but also students of sociology, history, psychology, philosophy, theater and art history should find this course illuminating. Permission to wave prerequisites may be requested of the instructor based on such interests in related fields of study.

Books:

Course Requirements:

Discussion: Participation in class discussion is essential. Since discussions will critically evaluate readings and films, assigned texts must be read prior to scheduled meetings. Unannounced quizzes may test your degree of preparation.

Criteria: There will be two papers, 8 pages each; outlines of each will be turned in for approval before the final drafts of the papers. Your ability to speak and write clearly and effectively, as well as the strength of your theoretical and analytical argument, will be the basis for evaluating discussion and papers. Webct vista material will supplement the class.

 

toptop

ENG 4135

Polish Cinema

Christopher Caes

(This course is cross-listed with PLW 4095/sec. 1082 Polish Cinema)

This course introduces and examines the modern cinema of Poland. Its twin focus is on poetics and politics, and it looks at the visual and narrative techniques that distinguish Polish films from Hollywood and other national cinemas as well as considering the unique role of film in Polish culture as popular memory and public discourse. Screenings will included pictures by the auteurs of Polish cinema, Andrzej Wajda, Krzysztof Kieslowski, and Agnieszka Holland, as well as films associated with important movements in Polish cinematography, such as the neoromantic Polish School of the late 50s and the socially engaged, realist films of the Cinema of Moral Concern of the late 70s.

toptop

ENG 4146

Advanced Film Production

Roger Beebe

This course is designed as an ambitious introduction to film (as opposed to video) production. Work will be exclusively in 16mm. We will explore the process from the most rudimentary ways of putting an image on film (scratching, direct animation, in-camera effects, etc.) to (relatively) advanced approaches to cinematography, processing, and editing. There will be no synchronous sound production in this course, so all films will be dialogue-free, although we will experiment with ways of adding sound (including double-system sound and video transfer). No previous experience with film (or video) production is necessary. What is necessary is a willingness to throw out all of your current ideas about film and to open yourself to experimentation.

Admission is by the consent of the instructor only. Contact him at <rogerbb@english.ufl.edu> for more details about the application process. The application process will begin before the start of advance registration for the spring, so you should contact him at least a week or two before that. Women and students of color should feel especially encouraged to apply. Film, even experimental film, is expensive, so be warned that there will unfortunately be a considerable materials cost for the class (around $300).

toptop

ENG 4905

Independent Study

Faculty Member of Choice

An Independent Study course may be taken for 1- to 3-credit hours and will count as credit toward the English major. This course may be repeated with a change of topic up to a maximum of 9 credits.

This course is for advanced students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The student must find a faculty member who is willing to supervise the semester-long study, and together, the two create a project. The student must meet with the professor at designated times, agreed upon in advance, and complete all assignments in a timely manner.

toptop

ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Your Mind on Media

Norman Holland

This seminar explores a relatively new field, the application of cognitive science and neuropsychology to our understanding of literary creation and response. I plan to open up what I take to be a fundamental question in literary studies: How does your brain make stories, movies, poems, and plays into pleasure? Along the way, we will consider such basic questions as the “willing suspension of disbelief” (why don’t you doubt the reality of Spider-Man?); why you feel real emotions toward people and events you know are not real; the reality of literary characters; how form works; the effect of being in an audience; how readers build “content”; acquiring a style; the nature of creativity; the ethical function of literature; why all cultures do literature – is it genetic?

We will not be reading literature as such – I assume you have done a lot of that – but we will be discussing your experience as readers. We shall be reading such people as: Noam Chomsky, George Lakoff, Mark Johnson, Hanna and Antonio Damasio, Jerry Fodor, Heinz Lichtenstein, Steven Pinker, Mark Solms, John Tooby and Leda Cosmides. And we will be reading some people who have begun to apply these ideas to literary and aesthetic questions: Patrick Hogan, Mark Turner, Ellen Dissanayake, Ellen Winner, and myself. Students will be asked to learn about brains, but I will keep this neuroscience to a necessary minimum.

Because a term paper is not appropriate for this level of this subject, I will give an hour exam (30% of final grade) and a final exam (40%). Grades will be based on those plus reports on outside reading (20%) plus participation in online and class discussion (10%).

This seminar comes out of the last three decades’ explosion of knowledge about the brain. In 1998, for example, there was a large, multi-session Forum at the MLA devoted to this topic, and there are several web sites continuing to develop it and also, of course, many books and articles. I believe literary people will find the topic more and more relevant to thinking about literature.

Norman Holland is Marston-Milbauer Eminent Scholar in English. He is a leading figure in the discipline of literature-and-psychology in the U.S. and the world. He has written fourteen books and over 150 articles, many of them dealing with psychoanalytic or reader-response criticism. You can find out more about him at <www.clas.ufl.edu/users/nnh>, where you can also look at the syllabus for an earlier version of this seminar.

toptop

ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Transnational Cinema

Scott Nygren

By the end of the twentieth century, filmmakers increasingly began to produce postnational narratives that are irreducibly embedded in two or more different cultures, in order to represent cultural displacement, economic migration, and nomadic knowledge. Working from a position of necessary alienation and representational instability, these filmmakers are at best capable of insights absent from either the classic Hollywood system or alternative national traditions. This course addresses the conflicted and potentially generative space between cultures that these films continually reconstitute.

Films to be discussed may include: Mohsen Makhmalbaf’s Once Upon a Time, Cinema (Iran, 1992), in which a Chaplin-like figure introduces cinema to the Persian court; Ye Ying’s Red Cherry (China, 1995), about two Chinese orphans in Nazi-occupied Byelorussia; Scott Hicks’s Snow Falling on Cedars (US, 1999), concerning a US reporter’s affair with an American Japanese woman before WW2; Merzak Allouache’s Salut Cousin! (France, 1996), in which an Algerian black-marketer spends an unexpected week with his neurotic Parisian cousin; Roberto Rossellini’s Socrates (Italy, 1970), which narrativizes the final years and death of the Greek philosopher; and Wong Kar Wai’s Happy Together (Hong Kong, 1997), about the struggle of two gay men from Hong Kong living in Buenos Aires.

toptop

ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: The City as Text: The Writings of Iain Sinclair

Julian Wolfreys

This seminar will examine the ways in which the city is mapped, figured, and represented in poetry, non-fiction prose, and the novel. The city on which we will concentrate is London, the writer on whom we will focus is Iain Sinclair, whose apocalyptic and millennial urban sensibilities place him in a tradition of dissenting urban textuality and figuration that includes William Blake and Charles Dickens. In looking at Sinclair’s writing as polemical and experimental, we will consider the ways in which London does not merely serve as a backdrop to his narratives but is that form or identity which actively gives shape to his writing.

Reading for the course is likely to include:

Course Requirements: Three essays 60%; in-class participation 40%

toptop

ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: The Pleasures of Genre: Fiction and Theory

Phillip Wegner

genre n [F, fr. MF genre kind, gender – more at GENDER] (1816) 1 : KIND, SORT 2 : a category of artistic, musical, or literary composition characterized by a particular style, form, or content

The great literary critic Tzvetan Todorov (whose work we will read this semester) notes, “for nearly two centuries, there has been a powerful reaction in literary studies against the very notion of genre. We write either about literature in general or about a single work, and it is a tacit convention that to classify several works in a genre is to devalue them.” At the same time, however, many of the most influential examples of the novel are in fact genre fictions. This includes rich and brilliant work in the genres of the historical novel, science fiction, the romance, bildungsroman, and the fantastic. Moreover, the category of genre was the site for some of the most important statements in literary theory produced during the preceding century. This course will introduce you to the study of genre, its potential and pleasures, through a careful examination of major works in genre theory coupled with significant examples of each form selected from the canons of nineteenth and twentieth century British literature and popular film. Although the reading list is not set in stone, some likely pairs include, Nancy Armstrong, Desire and Domestic Fiction: A Political History of the Novel and Jane Austen, Emma; Georg Lukács, The Historical Novel and Walter Scott, Waverly; Tzvetan Todorov, The Fantastic: A Structural Approach to a Literary Genre and James Hogg, The Last Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner; essays on science fiction by Darko Suvin, Fredric Jameson, Mark Rose, and H.G. Wells, The Time Machine; Franco Moretti, The Way of the World: The Bildungsroman in European Culture and James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Stanley Cavell, Pursuits of Happiness: The Hollywood Comedy of Remarriage and the films, The Lady Eve and Groundhog Day.

Students will be expected to participate in the seminar discussion; keep an ongoing journal on the readings; and produce a final formal seminar paper.

toptop

ENG 4940

Internship

Undergraduate Coordinator

The English Department at the University of Florida offers three* credit hours of internship to its majors who provide the following to the Undergraduate Coordinator for approval:

Once the Undergraduate Coordinator has approved the internship requested by the student, the department will register the student for the internship credits.

Upon completion of the internship:

*For two credit hours, the student would need to work 8 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 16 hours per week for Summer A or B.

*For one credit hour, the student would need to work 4 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 8 hours per week for Summer A or B.

Please note the following limitations on the English Internship:

toptop

ENG 4953

Issues of Gender and Sexuality in African Literature

Apollo Amoko

This course hinges on vexed questions pertaining to issues of gender and sexuality in modern African literature. Since the inauguration of the field in the late nineteen fifties and early sixties, sex and sexuality have constituted a central creative and interpretative problematic. The representational economies of most of the canonical texts of African literature have been called into question on account of their gender and/or sexual logics. Much of this critique has depended, for its authority, on theories developed in the Western academy. To what extent can such ostensible “western” theories as feminism and queer theory provide critical paradigms and parameters for the study of putatively African aesthetic objects? Are such theories necessarily inappropriate on their account “eurocentricism”? From the perspective of Western feminism and queer theory, is African literature doomed to seem sexist and heteronormative, if not, homophobic (in silent contradistinction, perhaps, to more enlightened Western literature)? Is a critique of sexism and heteronormativity in African letters conceivable outside the bounds of Western theory? Alternately, is it not problematic to conceive of African literature in terms its radical difference from the so-called Western tradition? In the name of contesting eurocentricism, do allegedly nativist theories of African literature risk normalizing historical and contemporary social inequalities, not to mention a certain anti-intellectualism? What accounts for the lingering hostility to feminism and especially queer theory in certain prominent quarters of African studies? Is the opposition pitting Western theory and African literature itself part of the problem it purports to resolve? To what extents are the texts in question “African”; to what extent is the theory in question “Western”? We will seek to answer these questions by looking at a range of canonical African fictions and Western theories of gender and sexuality.

toptop

ENG 4970

Honors Thesis Project

Faculty members (2) of Choice

Students must have have completed at least one semester of ENG 4936, Honors Seminar. Open to English Honors students.

The student must select two faculty members: one to direct the reading, research, and writing of a thesis on a topic of the student’s and director’s chosing, and another as the second reader. An abstract (100 to 200 words) and one copy of the thesis (30 to 50 pages) must be delivered to the CLAS Academic Advising Center on Fletcher Road at least 10 days before graduation.

toptop

ENL 3154

Modern British Poetry

Marsha Bryant

At the end of the 20th century, poet Poet Jo Shapcott observed: “The wars of this century, the end of empire, the aeroplane, the channel tunnel, the World Wide Web, the role of women, the power of multi-national conglomerates, the preponderance of great literature in English from elsewhere, our many changed viewpoints as we enter the new century, all these unite to tell us that the island story of England, little England, is finished.” One way to assess shifting cultural narratives of “Britishness” is through 20th century poetry and its canonical reconfiguration at millennium. This class will use the 2001 Anthology of Twentieth-Century British and Irish Poetry, published by Oxford University Press and edited by American academic Keith Tuma. Aimed mostly toward U.S. college students, the anthology marks the Press’s first updating of the field since Philip Larkin’s 1973 Oxford Book of Twentieth-Century English Verse. We will assess both its poetry and editorial agenda, considering the cultural narratives at work across the whole. You’ll be widening your exposure to a rich variety of poetry from standard modernist and postwar figures (Yeats, MacDiarmid, Owen, Auden, Larkin, Gunn, Hughes, Harrison, Heaney), from more women that one usually sees in a British anthology (not only Sitwell and Smith, but also Mew, Loy, Warner, Adcock, Wickham), from a large selection contemporary poets (Mahon, Boland, Riley, Muldoon, Alvi, Duffy), and from “Black British” poets (Breeze, Dabydeen, Kay, Nichols). Assignments include a panel presentation, an explication paper, a term paper, an exam essay, and a creative assignment.

toptop

ENL 3241

The Romantic Period

James Twitchell

This is an undergraduate survey of English romantic writers. It is roughly divided into nine parts: an introduction to romanticism, and then eight sections on individual writers. There is, relative to other English courses, little outside reading, as the main concern of the course is a careful reading of selected representative works. This is deceptive, for students might assume that the course will therefore be easy. There will be weekly quizzes (embarrassingly objective for an English course) and two short papers (not necessarily research papers). The quizzes give me a chance to get answers to questions I think are important; the papers give you a chance to form answers to questions you think are important. The class is informal and relaxed, but the quizzes and papers are not. The quizzes stress material covered in class and so it might be suggested that you take good and careful notes.

Texts

toptop

ENL 3251

Victorian Literature

Chris Snodgrass

[This course will help fulfill the requirements for any number of the curriculum “tracks” for a department major, including but not limited to the Cultural Studies, British Literature, and British and American Literature tracks.]

This course will attempt to define the world-views, beliefs, doubts, anxieties, and paradoxes of the Victorian Period through a survey of the poetry, fiction, drama, pictures, and critical theory of a few representative artists. We will be reading very few novels; rather, the course is mostly designed to introduce you to many of the other artistic forms – and broad intellectual history – of the Victorian Age, one of the most interesting and influential periods in Western history.

We will try to probe the assumptions which underlie the works of art we will be studying – the “why’s” implicit in the artists’ approaches to their themes as well as the themes themselves – including an investigation of related cultural issues. The material in the course will be grouped under one of four broad thematic categories: the century’s “Crisis of Faith” (Tennyson and Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde); the clash in shifting assumptions between Romanticism and Victorianism (Browning, High Victorian and Pre-Raphaelite painting); the “battle of the sexes,” or issues arising from various drives for “female emancipation” [“The Woman Question”] (women fiction writers and popular drama); and “counter-cultural” fin-de-siècle artistic movements, particularly Aestheticism and the Decadence (Oscar Wilde and Aubrey Beardsley).

By the end of this course, you will be expected to be able to demonstrate that you can (1) read accurately what the work says, and how it goes about saying what it says effectively; (2) establish what the premises of the work seem to be, that is, what the implicit concerns of the writer are, what world-view is implied or assumed; and (3) trace how these thematic patterns and philosophical issues or problems differ from writer to writer during the period. Attendance is mandatory; there is a cut rule.

Basis for final grade: Your grade will be computed as follows: 20%: your average score on the weekly one-page “Questions” (3–5 questions) regarding the week’s assignments, submitted at the first session of each new week; 35%: your average score on the weekly two-page “Themes & Ideas” papers (3–5 “ideas”) in reaction to the week’s assignments, submitted on either the last session of each new week or the first session of the very next week; 10%: your degree of active class participation and general preparedness during each class session; 5%: a group project and presentation; and 30%: a comprehensive final exam. Optional: You will have the option of substituting either a 1000–2500 word detailed poem analysis, or a 1500–3000 analytical term paper for any assignment category or combination of categories, except for the final exam and the “themes & ideas” papers, up to 25% of your final grade.

toptop

ENL 3251

Victorian Literature

Ariel Gunn

This course will introduce students to Victorian literature and the cultural anxieties, interests, and obsessions that shape it. We will familiarize ourselves with some of the cultural conversations occurring in Victorian Britain, particularly those about class and gender. Channeling these conversations through the fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction of the era, the class will engage these issues through in-class discussions and weekly responses. To better understand the workings of Victorian society, we will consider how cultural phenomenon like the Industrial Revolution, the Reform Bill(s), and the Woman Question impacts the Victorian’s conception of class and gender.

The goals of this class include familiarizing ourselves with Victorian texts, learning how to read these texts critically, and constructing essays that are thoughtful, meaningful, and convincing. In addition to weekly responses, assignments will also include two major papers, two exams, and an in-class presentation.

A tentative reading list and schedule will be available at the end of December at <http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/agunn/teaching/>.

toptop

ENL 3251

Victorian Literature

Michelle Sipe

This course serves as an introduction to a rich variety of Victorian texts and the social and cultural contexts that produced them. Class discussions will focus on a number of issues that were vitally important to Victorians including the impact of industrialization and urbanization on personal and social relationships; questions about class and class mobility; the debates over what Victorians referred to as the Woman Question; the effects of scientific and historical discoveries on religion and morality; and attempts to redefine the role of the artist in this complicated and uncertain new world.

The goals of the class include familiarizing ourselves with Victorian texts, learning how to read these texts critically, and constructing essays that are thoughtful, meaningful, and convincing.  In addition to regular written responses, course assignments will also include two 5–7 page papers, two exams, and an in-class presentation.

toptop

ENL 4220

Erotic Politics of Renaissance Culture

Richard Burt

In this course, we will examine the varied relations between eros and power as they emerge in Renaissance culture, beginning with the key Italian figures Aretino and Guilio Romano, and then move more widely into a consideration of Italian courtesans and literary culture (the poetry of Veronica Franco) and Italian and Northern Renaissance painting and models (Caravaggio, Artemisia Gentilescchi, Titian, Vermeer, and Cranach). From there, we’ll go to the English Renaissance poetry of Thomas Nashe and the drama of Christopher Marlowe (Edward II and Doctor Faustus), Thomas Middleton (The Revenger’s Tragedy and The Changeling). We will also examine a number of related films, including Caravaggio, Dangerous Beauty, Artemisia, Girl with a Pearl Earring, Edward II, The Changeling, The Revenger’s Tragedy, and Hotel (a film about the making of a film of The Duchess of Malfi). Requirements: discussion questions, a film clip assignment, two papers, and two presentations in class. The course website is at <http://www.clas.ufl.edu/~rburt/eroticpolitics/>.

toptop

ENL 4221

Milton: Major Works

R. Allen Shoaf

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the major poems and some of the important prose of Milton in such a way as to help them understand the significance of such a poet’s quest for a “fit audience... though few” (Paradise Lost 7.31).

This is a reading-intensive course. You will read a great deal in this course and be expected to read it very closely, very carefully. Hence the following three categories of requirements apply.

One, there will be numerous quizzes, unannounced except for this notice; these quizzes will assess your progress and pace in the reading (and will be graded with a + for “good”; ok for “adequate”; or ? for “needs improvement”).

There will be three essays, in length 5 pages (minimum) each, the first of which will be on a fixed topic, the other two of which, on topics of your choice. I set no upper limit to the length of these essays; however, I know from experience that fewer than 5 pages will not be adequate. From experience also I know that narrower is better – the narrower the topic, the likelier the success of the essay – and therefore you are urged to clear your topics with me.

The final category of requirement is the most difficult: it is called attention – if you do not pay attention to Milton, to every syllable (and I mean that literally), then you will not understand his writing. I will teach you how to employ your attention and where to focus it; but you must bring your attention to the texts we read together.

There will be no examinations.

Class attendance is mandatory and is strictly monitored: the first two (or three) absences (i.e., 150 minutes = 1 week) will be excused, but each absence thereafter, unless excused for extraordinary reasons and in writing, reduces your final mark by 10%.

toptop

ENL 4311

Chaucer

James Paxson

This course will familiarize students with the major narrative poetry of Chaucer. We will devote most of our study to several of The Canterbury Tales and to Chaucer’s great romance, Troilus and Criseyde. We will also examine at least one of Chaucer’s long allegorical poems, The House of Fame, along with Latin and Italian source materials included in our main textbook. Students will learn to read Chaucer’s Middle English (the form of the English language from about 1100-1500 C. E.), and they will be introduced to the principal methodological issues constitutive of contemporary Chaucer studies. That is, they will investigate how Chaucer studies incorporate modern critical theory – especially involving issues of narrative complexity, figurative discourse, and the poetic representation of gender. Particular focus will fall upon the issue of subjectivity, since Chaucer – often seen as the forerunner of modern novelistic art – lays claim to being the first major author in English to cultivate the poetics of the subjective, the personal, and the psychologically realistic. Class meetings will include lectures, discussion, and, especially early in the term, recitation and spot translation of Middle English.

Required texts, which will be available at Goerings’ Bookstore, will include the Norton Critical Edition of The Canterbury Tales (Kolve and Olson, ed.); the Colleagues Press edition of Troilus and Criseyde (Shoaf, ed.); The Cambridge Chaucer Companion (Boitani and Mann, ed.); and The House of Fame in a course packet.

Major course work includes: class participation and regular, unannounced quizzes (20%); translation exam (in late September 2003, 20%); three papers–the first (5–7 pages) on classical myths that served as sources for Chaucer (20%); the second (5–7 pages) on The House of Fame (5–7 pages); the third (5–7 pages) on any critical or thematic problem concerning The Canterbury Tales (5–7 pages). All three papers combine to represent 60% of final grade.

toptop

ENL 4333

Shakespeare

Peter L. Rudnytsky

This course will focus on themes of love and sexuality in plays and poems by Shakespeare from different phases of his career. Works to be read will include All’s Well That Ends Well, Othello, Two Gentlemen of Verona, the Sonnets, Macbeth, and The Tempest, among others. (We will read one play or other comparable assignment per week.) The emphasis will be on developing skills of close reading, rather than on literary theory, but the instructor’s approach will be primarily psychoanalytic and feminist. The course requirements are a midterm, final, and one five-page paper, as well as regular attendance and active class participation.

toptop

ENL 4333

Shakespeare

Mel New

We will be reading some 18 plays by Shakespeare at a rate of a play every 2 or 3 days. Students who do not enjoy reading ought not take this course. There will be quizzes to ensure that students stay up-to-date with assignments, and a take-home, essay-type, midterm and final exam. We will not perform the plays, we will not watch films of the plays, and we will not discuss Shakespeare’s political, economic, social, and gender shortcomings. We will talk about art, ideas, form, beauty, truth, and even, I give fair warning, about poetry. The fundamental theoretical framework of the course argues that students should read a great deal of good literature before being introduced to a plethora of bad criticism and worse theory. The course is, therefore, a theory-free zone – which is, of course, a theory worth contemplating.

toptop

LIN 4605

World Englishes

Roger Thompson

No course description is available at this time.

toptop

LIT 3003

Narratology of New Media

Terry Harpold

A survey of critical and theoretical issues posed by narrative genres and operations of interactive digital media. Critical readings for the course will include print and digital texts in narrative theory, new media theory and criticism, and human-computer interaction. Literary readings for the course will include four classic interactive and hypertext fictions (afternoon, Patchwork Girl, Twelve Blue, Zork) and three computer-based videogames (Civilization III, MYST, Riven). Students should have a basic knowledge of the WWW and other interactive digital media. All students must have access to a desktop computer system (Windows 98 or XP, Mac OS 9 or X) outside of the class meeting times. Course requirements include two take-home exams.

Please take note: This is not a “videogames” course. We will undertake careful, systematic narratological analysis of these representative texts of the emerging digital field. A devotee of videogames will have no more advantage in this course than would an enthusiast of popular films in a course on cinema theory and criticism. Critical readings for the course will be challenging; the digital texts we will discuss will require at least as much of your attention and time as an equal number of long and complex print narratives.

toptop

LIT 3031

Studies in Poetry

Debora Greger

No course description is available at this time.

toptop

LIT 3041

Tudor/Stuart Drama

Ira Clark

In LIT 3041 we will read about one non-Shakespearean play per week from the greatest era for English drama, perhaps the greatest era for drama in any language – from the middle of Elizabeth’s reign to the closing of the theaters in 1642. We will focus on understanding these plays in a number of contexts such as stage conditions; illusion/reality/representation; language, rhetoric, and style; the development of techniques and genres; and social, political, and theological conditions.

The course will proceed along lines of generic development throughout the period. In the first part we will read tragedies by Kyd, Marlow, Webster, and others; in the second, comedies by Dekker, Beaumont, Jonson, and others; in the third, Marston. Throughout the course students will take 11 unannounced brief quizzes (40% of the grade). At the end of each part students will be responsible for a paper: Paper I on a tragedy (about 3,000 words, 15% of the grade) Paper II on a comedy (about 3,000 words, 20% of the grade), Paper III on any non-Shakespearean play of the era not assigned to the class (about 5,000 words, 25% of the grade).

Our focus will be on developing students’ skills and knowledge towards two ends: first, in order to enjoy reading knowledgably and independently such famous plays as The Spanish Tragedy, Tamburlaine I, The Duchess of Malfi, The Shoemakers Holiday, Bartholomew Fair, A King and No King; second, in order to speak and write convincingly.

The full syllabus is posted to my web page. Taking a Shakespeare course alongside this one could prove valuable for both.

toptop

LIT 3173

Jewish Literature

Mel New

(This course is cross-listed with JST 3930/sec. 8134)

We will read six modern Jewish authors representing different modes of discourse (novel, short story, poetry, essay) in an attempt to talk intelligently about the meaning of Israel in the Jewish experience, and why at this time in American intellectual circles (as well as in the sewers of Europe and elsewhere) it has become fashionable, not to say de rigueur, to mask one’s antisemitism under the guise of an attack on the Jewish state. The authors include S. Y. Agnon, Isaac Babel, Paul Celan, Natalia Gizburg, Emmanuel Levinas, and Nelly Sachs. This is a difficult reading list, designed to challenge intellectual students of all religions or no religion at all – it is not a list that would please those seeking an education in ethnicity or the making of latkes. There will be quizzes to ensure students keep up to date with their readings, and a take-home, essay type, midterm and final.

toptop

LIT 3374

The Bible as Literature

Richard Brantley

The Old Testament (Hebrew Scriptures) is emphasized. The approach is historical and formalistic. Topics include: narrative (Samuel, Judges, Ruth, Jonah, Genesis); prophecy (Amos, Hosea, Jeremiah, Isaiah); Poetry (Psalms, Lamentations, Song of Solomon); and wisdom literature (Ecclesiastes, Job). Two six-page papers are required, or one twelve-page paper. Directions for the midterm and the noncumulative final are as follows: “Identify the following fifteen passages in no more than two sentences. Comment on two. Take class discussion into account and go beyond it.” The text is the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible.

toptop

LIT 3383

Contemporary Women’s Literatures of Trauma: Meta-Metropolitan Narratives and Identities

Sophie Croisy

This class will focus on the work of contemporary female authors whose writings on trauma have been largely ignored by theorists of trauma who define and delimit the field of Trauma Studies in sometimes narrow and unproductive ways. Whether they are psychoanalysts, poststructuralist thinkers or historians, most theorists of trauma have looked at trauma fiction for its ethical functions, its performative treatment of the work of memory, its role in combining the factuality of history with the emotions of testimony, etc. However, the tendency in trauma studies has been to rely on Western and metropolitan novels that focus on the traumas “Westerners” know best – the so-called uber-traumas of history. The purpose of this class is not to undermine the conversations that are taking place in trauma studies or dismiss the necessity to keep talking about major traumas such as the Shoah. Our purpose will be to look at certain female authors whose work is part of the process of recuperating erased, non-Western traumas, and re-theorize certain aspects of trauma studies. Through their work, we will try, for example, to think differently about the role of mourning and melancholia in the healing process of a traumatized individual or group. We will try to consider other, non-traditional possibilities for coping with trauma that help us move away from the desire for finality in healing. The books under scrutiny will all participate in the formation of new, productive discourses about trauma which take us away from a conservative, monolithic envisioning of the relationship between trauma and memory, trauma and history, trauma and time, trauma and politics.

Some of the books we will be reading in this class: (list to be revised and completed)

toptop

LIT 4183

Tourism, the Caribbean and Literature

Leah Rosenberg

Documenting the devastating effects of globalization and tourism on the Jamaican economy and autonomy, Stephanie Black’s 2001 film Life and Debt puts in sharp relief the contrast between tourists’ vision of Jamaica and that of Jamaicans in the late 20th century. It reveals the most recent developments in a long cultural and economic history. From Shakespeare’s The Tempest to Terry McMillan’s How Stella Got her Groove back and Walt Disney’s The Pirates of the Caribbean, travel and tourism to the Caribbean have been surprisingly prominent and spectacular in European and U.S. culture. This strong and changing image of the Caribbean has in large part been a consequence of the economic position of the Caribbean vis-à-vis first world nations – first a wondrous new world, then a site of slave and sugar factories, now a pleasure destination. Not surprisingly, Caribbean writers have also given a significant place to tourism and travel in their work, often exposing the sharp disjunction between Caribbeans’ experiences and those of tourists. This distinction has become complicated since the late 20th century when the many Caribbeans living outside the region visited their homelands as tourists to carnival and other events like Reggae Sunsplash. This course examines the economic and literary history of tourism in the Caribbean through an analysis of theoretical and literary texts which will likely include works by Shakespeare, Jamaica Kincaid, V.S. Naipaul, Anthony Trollope, Anthony Winkler, Paule Marshall, Terry Mcmillan, Colin Channer, Dean MacCannell, Cynthia Enloe, James Clifford and Kamala Kempadoo.

toptop

LIT 4192

Anglophone Caribbean Literature: Its History & Debates

Leah Rosenberg

In The Pleasures of Exile, his 1960 analysis of anglophone Caribbean culture, George Lamming asserted that the emergence of “a dozen or so novelists in the British Caribbean... between 1948 and 1958” was one of the three most important historical developments in the region, the other two being “the discovery” of the Americas and the abolition of slavery and the subsequent importation of indentured labor. These new writers, he asserted, invented anglophone Caribbean literature “without any previous native tradition to draw on.” This is a startling claim given the fact that short stories, novels, and poetry written by anglophone Caribbeans were published by local newspapers and by metropolitan presses since the 19th century. The goal of this course is to investigate canon formation in the anglophone Caribbean and in so doing to place Lamming’s claims in the context of a history of debates over the definition and purpose of literature in the Caribbean. In addition to these debates, we will examine a broad variety of canonical and non-canonical literary texts. Authors will likely include: George Lamming, V.S. Naipaul, Merle Hodge, Nalo Hopkinson, and Jean Rhys.

toptop

LIT 4322

The Folktale

Robert Thomson

For the purposes of this course, the term folktale will be held to encompass all forms of orally transmitted prose narratives including myths, legends, memorates and wonder-tales. No knowledge of the folktale or of the general field of folklore studies is assumed by the instructor. The first week or so of the course will attempt to orient all students to the place of the folktale in folklore studies. The three required texts have been chosen to give a representative collection of all types of prose narrative. While covering the major aspects of the familiar European tradition the texts will also bring to our attention the ethnic traditions of the United States, particularly the oral narratives recorded from Native Americans in Wisconsin at the turn of the nineteenth/twentieth centuries and African Americans in Eatonville, Florida in the 1920’s and ’30’s. In addition, we will address those issues that have for half a century kept theorists and analysts struggling with the complexities of these “simple forms.”

Texts (available from Goering’s Bookstore):

In addition to the study of tales within the texts above, we will address the following topics:

There will be 3 tests given at roughly three week intervals during the course. In addition two reports, each of about 2500 words will be required. Grades will be based upon the tests (10% each test) the reports (30% each report) and class participation etc.

I will be available on class days between 9.00 and 10.00 AM. In addition I can arrange appointments if you phone me at 392-6650, ext 267. My office is in Turlington Hall – Rm.4342. Email: <rthomson@english.ufl.edu>.

toptop

LIT 4332

Literature for Young Children

John Cech

This course is meant to be an introduction to and an exploration of the child’s earliest experiences with literature, from birth until his/her first years in school. We will be interested in the relationships between children’s books and oral literature and the imaginative, aesthetic, moral, and psychological growth of their young audiences. The course is designed to involve you actively, analytically, and creatively in the study of this subject. You will be encouraged to develop a first hand sense of how some forms of children’s literature are created; you will be asked to look at works for children with a critical eye; and you will be urged to do your own field work, testing assertions, questions, and ideas that are raised in the course. Literature for Young Children is intended for the children in your classrooms, the children in your home, and the child who still lives somewhere within you.

toptop

LIT 4333

Literature for the Adolescent

Kenneth Kidd

This course examines literature for, by, and about adolescents in the twentieth century, across a range of genres and with attention to the political and social history of adolescence as a concept and as a lived experience. We’ll concentrate on what’s now called “young adult” literature from the 1960s forward, but we will read and discuss that material in light of earlier narrative traditions. The modern adolescent is of course intimately connected to material culture in particular ways; being a so-called “teenager” means watching tv, driving cars, and buying lots of cool stuff. It also means being a social problem, and many of our selections are problem novels in the new realism mode of young adult literature. We will concentrate heavily on contemporary literature in the hopes of assessing what’s happening in young adult publishing and media culture. The course will be conducted as a seminar and participation is crucial. We will at least one YA book per week, plus some criticism and theory. Requirements include weekly response papers, regular participation, and 2 essays to be negotiated later.

Texts (Check with me before you buy books, as titles are subject to change)

toptop

LIT 4431

Literature of Science

James Paxson

Since the publication of Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions in the early 1960s – a book which Richard Rorty has called the single most important text for contemporary academic culture and critical theory – scientists and humanists alike have sought to understand the rhetorical, structural, and literary qualities of scientific writing. The literary genre of science fiction may proffer texts loaded with scientific themes and images, but what of the “literariness,” the rhetoricality, of science writing itself? What can we determine about the figural or imaginative dimensions of the writings of important scientists? What have been the ideological, social, gendered, historical, and institutional implications of such figurations? The Literature of Science will offer primary readings in the work of some major scientists (Galileo, Newton, Kepler, Lord Kelvin, Darwin, Einstein, Bohr, Feynman, Hawking, Penrose) and secondary readings in contemporary science studies. The course will be preoccupied with the theme of modern cosmology and the scientific “poetics” of space-time, although it will also take up the rhetoric or metaphorics of science in general. Resources will be drawn from physics, biology, mathematics, geography, astronomy, psychology, cybernetics, rhetoric, poetry, literary and critical theory, and philosophy.

Assignments will include one short paper (5–7 pages; 25% final grade) on a scientist of your choice (with a focus on the rhetoricality of his or her work) and a term paper (12–15 pages; 50%) on some theoretically central issue in contemporary science studies (the legacy of Complexity or Chaos Theory, the Darwinist heritage, connections between Quantum Theory and poststructural epistemologies, the fallout of the “Sokal Affair,” the phenomenon of the “scientific pipe dream” – such as Cold Fusion or Hollow Earth Theory, etc.). The two papers may be linked. Attendance and participation are expected (more than 6 cuts warrants failure); occasional quizzes and a final exam (totaling 25%) round out course work.

toptop

LIT 4535

Women, Work, and Popular Culture

Susan Hegeman

Arguably one of the biggest changes affecting American women over the last century has been their entry in unprecedented numbers into the public world of wage labor. Meanwhile, polls continue to show that women do a disproportionate share of domestic labor, including housekeeping and childcare. This course will examine women’s labor, both paid and unpaid, through the lens of popular culture including films, popular literature, and fashion. In our discussions we will consider popular cultural materials not simply as evidence of dramatic historical changes involving women and work, but as attempts to make sense of these changes as well. Readings will include historical and critical studies, popular nonfiction, and novels.

Possible texts include

We will also discuss a number of films, possibly including

Grading will be based upon class participation and three take-home exams.

toptop

LIT 4930

Joyce and Cultural Studies

Brandon Kershner

The course will be an introduction both to James Joyce and to the broad field of cultural studies, using Joyce’s fiction as examples of literary texts with particularly rich cultural resonance. We will read Dubliners, Exiles, A Portrait of the Artist, and Ulysses. Our emphases will include the areas of

Although the course obviously will engage with theory, the stress will be upon specific implications of the literary texts rather than upon the theory in and for itself. As an aid in reading Ulysses, we will use Harry Blamires’s guide to that novel entitled The New Bloomsday Book. I will bring in copies of newspapers and advertisements of the time as well as some examples of the popular reading to which Joyce alludes, show slides of Eugen Sandow the bodybuilder and memorial photography of children, and discuss other examples of material culture from turn-of-the-century Ireland. Since I am involved in the production of a hypertext Ulysses, we will discuss aspects of that project throughout the course, as it relates to issues raised by cultural studies.

Texts: The Viking Critical edition of Dubliners (eds. Scholes and Litz) and the Bedford Books edition of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (ed. Kershner); Harry Levin’s Portable James Joyce (for the play Exiles); Hans Walter Gabler’s edition of Ulysses and Harry Blamires’s The New Bloomsday Book. My own Joyce, Bakhtin, and Popular Literature is recommended; my Twentieth-Century Novel: An Introduction would be useful for the broader literary background. All of these are available at Goering’s Bookstore. I will also be distributing a good deal of material as handouts during the course.

Requirements: (1, 2) Two papers, the first 8–10 pages long, the second 12–18 pages. (3) About three or four unannounced quizzes – very simple ones – to make sure we’re all keeping up with the reading.; an additional 15% or so of your grade will be determined by class participation.

toptop

LIT 4930

Creative Nonfiction Workshop

Jill Ciment

Creative nonfiction includes memoir, personal essays, meditations, et cetera – any piece of nonfiction that doesn’t follow the strict guidelines of journalism.

This course will be run in the “traditional” workshop fashion with occasional lectures. Writing exercises will be assigned at the beginning, but the primary emphasis is on self-generated work. Each student will be expected to write two nonfiction pieces, as well as complete a final draft of each.

Optimally, students will turn in essays that they have taken as far as they can on their own. The workshop should be a venue to test the waters, to try new things, to present first drafts as well as polished works, but only after the writer has struggled with it to the nth degree. The idea is for students to rigorously challenge themselves. Everyone not presenting work should take their jobs as critics and editors as seriously as they take their own writing.

Reading will be assigned.

Submissions for Creative Nonfiction:

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For LIT 4930, submit one of the following: a memoir, personal essay, or short story (5–10 pp.)

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors want you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or whether they want you to submit your manuscripts via email. All submissions must be received by October 15, 2004.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

A list of those admitted will be posted outside the Creative Writing Suite, Turlington 4211, at the beginning of advance registration. Students who are admitted and who are free of registration holds will be automatically registered for the appropriate course by the Undergraduate Academic Advisor.

toptop

LIT 4930

Blake, Newton, Disney

Donald Ault

Though it will deal with many additional related texts, this seminar will use the names (and detailed analysis of the works) of Blake, Newton, and Disney as a springboard to study the extent to which academic scholarship has circumscribed and homogenized fields such as Romanticism, the history of science, and popular culture and has thus been complicit with ways these conceptual myths have reductively circulated through world culture.

Requirements: essays, quizzes, productive class participation, and a final project.

Required Text: Course Packet (Xerographic Copy Center, 927 N.W. 13th Street). More may be added.

toptop

LIT 4930

Booker Prizewinners

Robert Thomson

A study of a number of novels, unified by having won the prestigious Booker Prize for fiction written in English by authors from Britain or one of the former territories of Empire excluding the USA. We will find that these works, written between 1971 and the present day, range from modernist to post-modernist in style and form. While we will be particularly concerned with the manner in which they address issues of multi-culturalism, nationalism, hybridity, the post-colonial experience &c., other more general features of the genre will be a part of our discussions.

Among the many issues we might address, the problem of knowing the past seems almost unavoidable. Can we know the past? – Is such an act possible or is the past irretrievable and other. How may we know the past? – Can we be objective in our representation or as New Historicists suggest do the limitations of our historical embeddedness necessarily impede our ability to escape the ideologies of today – etc.

Nothing is closed to our consideration in our readings of these novels. Reading itself is a creative act and in this respect we shall be limited only by imagination — yours and mine. The seven novels I select, almost at random from past prize winners, are, supposedly among the finest novels written in English outside the United States in the final decades of the twentieth century. We might even question this evaluation, asking – to what degree are we enmeshed in the mechanics of production and marketing? Are these really the best books or are we continually subjected to bizarre/arcane canons of taste?

Texts will be selected from:

A list of recommended and required secondary readings will be made available. In addition I will periodically suggest web-sites of relevance to our readings. Assignments will be a number of short reaction papers addressing texts plus a longish (10–15 pp) research paper due towards the end of the semester. In addition regular oral assignments should be expected.

toptop

LIT 4930

Advertising & Culture

James Twitchell

Although there are courses in advertising and advertisements, this course attempts to chart the history of a culture – our popular culture – as it has been defined and conveyed by commercial speech. We will discuss the history and changing definition of advertising; the effects of commercial discourse on our sense of self, time, and place; and essentially argue that advertising has become, like religion, one of the primary institutions of our “sociosphere.” The course is not a criticism but an exploration. “Advertising and Culture” is not a course intended to teach advertising techniques and practices to professional or pre-professional students.

Texts

Requirements

toptop

LIT 4930

Shakespeare: Rhetoric

R. Allen Shoaf

This course will examine representative works from the poems (lyric and narrative), the tragedies, the comedies, and the histories to observe and analyze the resources of language – puns and tropes, in particular – that Shakespeare exploits to invent his art.

Students will write two long essays (7–10 pages) on topics they first clear with me. There will be no examinations.

Class attendance is mandatory and is strictly monitored: the first two (or three) absences (i.e., 150 minutes = 1 week) will be excused, but each absence thereafter, unless excused for extraordinary reasons and in writing, reduces the final mark by 10%.

toptop

SPC 3605

Speechwriting

Ron Carpenter

Speechwriting is an advanced composition course. In SPC 3605, students acquire stylistic prowess by which their sentences have increased potential for memorability and quotability, ease and accuracy of comprehension, as well as overall persuasiveness. The course is called Speechwriting because models of eloquence to be imitated are in sentences of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, John Kennedy, and Martin Luther King, Jr., for examples. Although you practice these stylistic skills while writing speeches, the acquired prowess is applicable in virtually any future communication endeavors, as speakers or writers, regardless of profession.

SPC 3605 is not about supporting arguments or organizing them into broader discourse. If you seek those skills, other courses are more appropriate. Speechwriting is about how to select the best words and arrange them in their best orders – within sentences – to achieve optimal impress of your ideas upon readers or listeners. These stylistic skills are practiced and perfected in drafts that you aloud among peers (and for me) during our “lab” periods, wherein you should acquire a refined sense of how to achieve the final product desired at the semester end. Thus, present drafts when due; listen carefully to other students’ drafts, comparing yours with theirs; participate in rewriting others’ sentences; and heed my commentary about all drafts. Do not assume that “participation” means simply presenting your drafts and listening only to commentary about them.

How a draft is presented, vocally and physically, has no bearing on your grade (for help with delivery skills other courses are appropriate; I may make suggestions about how to improve your platform presence, however). The important point is that Speechwriting is an advanced composition course, wherein you read drafts aloud as bases of discussion by which all students understand how and why some sentences are better than others. For initial and final drafts, I require word processing available in computer labs on campus (if you do not have your own computer). Revision on your disk is easier; spelling is accurate; and word lengths of drafts are known.

From past experience, I know that reasonably diligent students achieve a substantial measure of the stylistic skills taught in this course. Final grades are higher, however, as you (1) demonstrate refined prowess as the competent stylist on exams and in final drafts, (2) understand course precepts derived from readings and lecture materials, as tested by three exams during the semester (the course has no final exam), and (3) produce a final research paper about style as defined in this course (research paper options will be explained during a lecture relatively early in the semester and will require additional library reading). Final grades are determined one-half by the average of your three exam scores and one-half by the quality of your final notebook with polished drafts of speeches and the research paper – all typed, double-spaced, and turned in during exam week at the time and date listed in the University Timetable as the course final exam period. The textbook for the course is Ronald H. Carpenter, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works; it can be purchased at Goerings Book Store at Bageland.

Although this is a writing course, I also am impressed – for grading purposes – by how much you know about style as defined in this class. Please appreciate the fact that this composition course is unlike virtually all other persuasive writing courses at the University of Florida, for the expertise and confidence in the precepts being taught are derived from your instructor’s own published research in four scholarly press books, several book chapters, and numerous research journal articles (all of which informed my writing of your textbook). Furthermore, from my experience as a communications consultant for organizations outside the university (such as corporate executives, lawyers, civic leaders, hospital administrators, public relations professionals, and officers attending the U.S. Naval War College), I know that skills taught in this course are useful in the “real” world.

In conclusion, teaching you to be eloquent stylists gives me great personal satisfaction. For I can make positive changes in your behaviors as communicators. If you join me in this endeavor, which admittedly entails some substantial effort on your part, I promise you will acquire valuable skills that will be admired by others as well as be useful for the rest of your life, no matter what your later profession might be. The only prerequisite for the course is that you can write grammatical sentences that are punctuated correctly.

toptop

SPC 4680

Rhetorical Criticism: Masterpieces of Rhetoric

Ron Carpenter

Rhetorical Criticism has as its focus several “masterpieces of rhetoric.” Although several of these are in the realm of political and presidential discourse, another focus this semester will be upon rhetorical efforts to persuade Americans to engage in armed conflict with other nations. Thus, students will examine how some speakers, writers, and film makers appealed successfully to specific attitudes and actions with profound influence upon the course of events. The primary goal of the course is to provide students will a refined sense of some rhetorical principles and techniques by which their own future discourse is more effective persuasively. Please note: “rhetoric” is not a pejorative word. In its current and inaccurate usage, the word often is prefaced with the adjective “empty” to disparage what “other” people say or write ostensibly as groundless emotional appeal in contradistinction to discourse that presumably only “tells it like it is.” But accurately, “rhetoric” refers to those means by which discourse “adjusts ideas to people and people to ideas.” So rhetoric is the art of persuasion, and rhetorical criticism identifies and assesses what was done with words (and other factors) to achieve persuasion.

Students will write five short papers (2–3 typed pages), four of which will summarize and expand briefly upon assigned readings, films, or group projects (the fifth paper is the enthymemic persuasion of me, an assignment that will be described in week six). I will accept these papers co-signed by all group members that participated. A longer final paper (8–10 typed pages) will report research about some topic suggested by the course (the focus of that paper must be developed in consultation with me). The course will have four very short quizzes during the semester as well as a “take home” final exam. Please understand that your group projects will require meetings with your student peers outside regular class periods. Students also are required to view some films outside of class. The textbook is Halford Ryan, Contemporary American Public Discourse: A Collection of Speeches and Critical Essays. It is available at Goerings Book Store, next to Bageland.

toptop