Undergraduate Courses, Spring 2007

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Upper Division (3000–4000) Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

AML 3285

What is Native American Literature?

Susan Hegeman

This survey of literature by Native American authors from the 19th and 20th centuries will focus on providing some answers to the question “What is Native American literature?” – that is, who is a “Native American,” what is “literature,” and what are the specific problems and concerns associated with identifying a literary tradition associated with a diverse group of indigenous peoples? We will be discussing films, transcriptions of oral materials, and novels and memoirs by such writers as Sherman Alexie, Charles A. Eastman, Louise Erdrich, N. Scott Momaday, John Rollin Ridge, Leslie Marmon Silko.

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AML 3673

Introduction to Asian-American Studies

Malini Schueller

This course is an introduction to the central critical debates in Asian-American studies as well as to major cultural and literary texts. Accordingly, the readings span a temporal range of Asian-American cultural production as well as the debates generated by the institutionalization of Asian-American studies to the present moment. The course includes writings by Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, and Filipino Americans, but the point is not simply to emphasize the cultural and national multiplicity of Asian-American writing. Rather, the readings are organized according to major questions that recur in Asian-American writing across different national boundaries: the narration of cultural conflict; colonial stereotypes and cultural identity; racial difference; redefining feminism; transnational and postcolonial identities. Our goal will not be to arrive at some definition of what it means to be Asian-American but rather to interrogate and scrutinize this category, to understand the complexities of being interpollated as such or in choosing such a marker of self definition in the US. Possible texts might include the following:

…as well as a number of critical essays.

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AML 4170

Re-Reading the American Novel

Julie Kim

What is the novel, and what makes a novel ‘American’? How should we read and interpret novels? The answers to such questions may seem obvious, but in this course, we will interrogate standard assumptions about genre and national literature by examining the range of novels Americans read and wrote in the eighteenth century. As we will see, some but not all of these novels addressed uniquely American topics, such as the American Revolution and the formation of the new United States. Furthermore, British novels, popular throughout the eighteenth century among American audiences, continued to be read and emulated by American authors after the Revolution. How can we claim that certain novels were American when they borrowed heavily from British literary conventions and themes? Additionally, once we consider that the eighteenth-century novel was a profoundly experimental genre that authors used to write history, romance, travelogue, science, science fiction, horror, and philosophy, can we even say that we know what a novel is? To deal with the challenges posed by the eighteenth-century novel in America, we will read, in addition to the novels, theoretical and critical works about the novel. In this sense, this course will introduce you not only to the eighteenth-century novel but also to key strategies for reading the novel and related narrative forms.

Readings may include Samuel Richardson’s Pamela, Laurence Sterne’s Sentimental Journey, William Hill Brown’s The Power of Sympathy, Hannah Webster Foster’s The Coquette, Susanna Rowson’s Charlotte Temple, Royall Tyler’s The Algerine Captive, William Godwin’s Caleb Williams, and Charles Brockden Brown’s Edgar Huntly, as well as critical works by Michael McKeon, Nancy Armstrong, Mikhail Bakhtin, Fredric Jameson, and Franco Moretti. Assignments will include weekly responses, two short papers to be turned in during the course of the semester, and a final, longer paper.

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AML 4213

Transatlantic Circulations: Early ‘American’ Bodies, Borders, Texts

Jodi Schorb

Since the American Revolution, American literary historians have had a tendency to posit a distinctly national literary history, overlooking the transatlantic contexts of American literature, particularly the ways that Britain continued to shape the literary culture of the Americas. This class will explore the ways England, Europe, and Africa (in particular) helped to develop the literary landscape of the Americas, resituating “classic” early American texts within their transatlantic contexts, while introducing less canonical texts that benefit from being read within this wider perspective. We’ll explore the production and reception of early American figures (from Pocahontas to the Puritans to Phillis Wheatley and Olaudah Equiano), and a range of literary genres (the Barbary captivity narrative, the novel of sentiment, the slave narrative, early national drama) whose influence and meanings are forged through transatlantic crossings and contexts. How did the literary landscape of the Americas develop and evolve in response? What forces (social, political, economic) helped shape American literary history? How do travel and forced migration shape cultural identity? How do they contribute to emerging ideas about gender and race? How does cultural crossing afford new modes of narrative self-fashioning? Overall, the course will provide an understanding of the more diverse origins of the early American literary tradition.

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AML 4225

American Fiction to 1865

David Leverenz

This course will begin with slave narratives by Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and perhaps Olaudah Equiano. Then we’ll turn to a variety of short stories by Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, partly to explore how white writers represent blackness, partly to showcase the range of their narratives, and partly because their stories are wonderful. Then we’ll consider Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin and Herman Melville’s Moby Dick. We’ll probably close with at least one or two essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson, then poems by Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. Everyone should already have read Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter.

We won’t be using an anthology: texts are likely to be Emerson’s essays (Dover ed.), Melville’s Moby Dick (Penguin ed.), Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (Harper Classics ed.), Douglass’s 1845 Narrative, and Jacobs’s Incidents (both in the Mentor edition of Classic Slave Narratives, ed. Henry Louis Gates, along with Equiano’s), various stories familiar and unfamiliar by Poe and Hawthorne in their Library of America editions, and Whitman’s poetry, along with Dickinson handouts. Depending on students’ interests and backgrounds, I may change the syllabus to add some Thoreau or perhaps another Hawthorne romance or Melville’s crazy Pierre or “Bartleby, the Scrivener” or Benito Cereno or Billy Budd, or some Cooper, perhaps The Last of the Mohicans, or Margaret Fuller’s “The Great Lawsuit.”

Writing required: three comparative close readings, 4–6 pp. (90%, or 30% for each, with a little more weight for the better essays), and one initial exercise (10%). No final exam. If classroom discussions flag and the assigned e-mailings don’t work, I’ll institute weekly take-home quizzes. Grading will be based entirely on your writing, with three exceptions:

  1. Late essays will have their grades get a lower grade for each class period.
  2. I require attendance. Missing more than four classes without a valid excuse will lower your final grade, proportionate to the number of absences.
  3. E-mailed discussion topics. I’ll ask 8 to 10 of you, in rotation, to e-mail me the night or early morning before each class to state topics you’d like to discuss that day. Those who fail to do that more than once will find their grades docked.

Grading: I will give an A if the essay makes a complex and/or surprising and spirited argument, and supports that argument – not three or four arguments! – with well-developed analysis of language as well as themes and not many grammatical problems. I will give a B+ if the essay is relatively well-focused, organized, and developed, with sparks of analytic originality or daring, but has some grammatical errors and lacks complexity or analytic zing. I will give a B if the essay is relatively well-focused but needs more ample development, tends to summarize themes, and has recurrent grammatical errors or lapses. Lower grades indicate greater problems with development, organization, and grammar. Recurrent grammatical errors lower the grade; spelling errors and typos don’t, within reason. The best essays sustain complex and/or audacious arguments; a good “B” essay will capably compare themes. I encourage “prewrites,” if handed in a week before the assignment is due.

I grade your writing, not your contributions to class discussions. I try to make class sessions relaxed, a place where all of us can try out ideas without feeling silly, weird, or stupid. It’s often the case that what seems obvious or off the wall to you is exactly what needs to be said, and I hope you say it.

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LIT 4242

The “Movement of Movements:” Frontism and Revolution at the End of the Century

Michael Rowley

In this course, we will examine how the logic of recent capitalism has influenced the representation of revolution in contemporary art, literature, and cultural documents. Readings may include selections from the following theorists: Paolo Virno, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri, Donna Haraway, Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Slavoj Žižek, Manuel Castells, and Fredric Jameson, among others. In particular, we will explore exodus, swarm intelligence, lines of flight, refusal of work, network struggle, frontism, post-humanism, the cyborg, and other revolutionary concepts and techniques in our own moment that differ both tactically and strategically from those available during the first half of the twentieth century – the period that coincides with literary Modernism.

To explore these abstract concepts in an English department course, we will engage in the study of theories and methods of the interpretations of texts—i.e., in standard hermeneutics. We will read the fiction of David Foster Wallace, John Barth, and Ana Castillo, among others. We may also read the Porto Alegre Manifesto, several texts surrounding Tute Bianchi (White Overalls), F*cking Furious Theatre’s The Girls of May, Rage Against the Machine’s music video for “Sleep Now in the Fire,” and some texts surrounding the black bloc, among others.

Weekly readings will never exceed one hundred and fifty pages, and will rarely exceed one hundred pages. However, like most department courses, this one requires regular attendance and participation (during panels, presentations, and discussions) and approximately a three-hour weekly devotion outside of class. Assignments will include A) ten (250-word) responses for the theory readings and questions for the hermeneutic texts, B) a revised writing project (of at least 4500 words) and its presentation during one of the first sessions on Thursdays, and C) three group panels on Tuesdays during which students will lead discussion once (for ten to fifteen minutes), and will support other group members twice. For more information, contact mrowley@english.ufl.edu.

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AML 4311

The Poetry of Emily Dickinson

Richard Brantley

The approach to Dickinson’s 1789 poems and 1049 letters is historical, interdisciplinary, biographical, and formalistic. Topics included are: tones, voices, punctuation, meters, metaphors, controlling ideas; dashes, compression, nonrecoverable deletions, verbs, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, variant words and phrases; rhymes; riddles; fascicles (or manuscript books); biographical criticism (an overview); the issue of morbidity; love; nature and consciousness; God and self; death, pain and aftermath; creativity; the enigma of self and other; feminist perspectives on recurring questions; gender and multiple meaning; Dickinson as comic poet; and biographical/cultural contexts. Fifteen-to-twenty pages of critical/scholarly response are required, together with a twenty-minute oral report on these pages.

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AML 4311

Major Author: Philip Roth

Andrew Gordon

Philip Roth is one of the most accomplished American novelists since WW II. He has been publishing fiction since 1959 and garnered popular attention, major literary awards, critical praise, and fierce condemnation. He is best known as the author of the controversial Portnoy’s Complaint (1969), but he has also written many other innovative novels, including the recent best-seller The Plot Against America. Even as he continued to focus on Jewish-American male identity in the period since World War II, he has grown from realist to postmodernist, conducting daring explorations across the boundary lines between fact and fiction, investigating both “real life” and the stories we construct about it and live by.

Goals:

We will read some of Roth’s major fiction. Time permitting, we will also view some film adaptations, such as Goodbye Columbus and The Human Stain. We will consider Roth in a number of contexts: as Jewish-American author, as an American author deeply concerned about American history, politics, culture, race, and gender, as a realist, and as a metafictionist.

This course aims to improve your understanding of post-WW II American fiction and Jewish-American culture through extensive reading and writing about the works of a single major author.

Readings:

About Philip Roth:

Requirements:

  1. Quizzes = 20%.
  2. Attendance and participation = 10%.
  3. Two papers: Paper 1= 25%; Paper 2= 35%. Paper 1 should be five pages and deal with one novel from Weeks 1–6. Alternatively, for Paper 1 (but not Paper 2), you may use the fiction to create your own short story: for example, “Further Adventures of Portnoy.” You may revise Paper 1 if it receives a grade less than B (but not if it is a late paper). Paper 2 should be a research paper (cite at least four critical sources) of seven pages dealing with a work read in Weeks 7–16.
  4. Oral report = 10%.

Note: There will be no midterm or final exam.

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AML 4453

Modernism: New York City

Stephanie Smith

New York City established itself as a significant “metropolitan” seaport, particularly during the 19th century. Although Boston remained a powerful seaport, from which both goods and a burgeoning American literary culture were exported, New York came to dominate such trade and, by the 20th century, took its place as a “world trade center.” In the early part of the 20th century, the cultural experiment called “modernism” found a home in this city, and this course is designed to take an in-depth look at New York through the eyes of the artists and writers who throve there – even when they went abroad.

Readings will include both poetry and prose, work by William Dean Howells, Edith Wharton, Theodore Dreiser, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Hart Crane, and more.

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AML 4685

Race and Ethnicity: Sounds of Blackness/Signs of Self

LaMonda Horton Stallings

Blackness is a narrative conveyed through various mediums and genres. This class will investigate the writing of blackness and the sounds of blackness from the 20th and 21st century. We will note the influence of African-American musical aesthetics on African-American fiction, poetry, and drama, as well as the influence of African-American literary tradition on African-American music. Emphasis on the literary use of jazz/blues/be-bop, soul/neo-soul/ hip-hop, gospel/spirituals, funk, and go-go.

Emphasis on musical use of autobiographical techniques, folk traditions, nationalist thought, afrocentricity, science fiction, and pulp fiction aesthetics. Literary, musical, and cinematic texts to be supplemented with literary theory and ethnomusicology criticism.

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AML 4685

Race and Ethnicity in Twentieth-Century American Literature: Jewish-American Fiction

Andrew Gordon

This course traces the development of Jewish-American fiction within the context of twentieth-century American literatures and cultures and deals with the role of ethnic literatures within our multiethnic nation. Though diverse in form and style, most of the works we will read deal with problems of assimilation of Jews into American society and the quests of the protagonists for identity as both Americans and Jews.

We begin with the influence of Eastern-European Yiddish literature (stories in translation) and then read a selection of Jewish-American stories and novels from the beginning of the twentieth century up to the present. We will also view a documentary on the history of the Jews in America and a few fiction films (Hester Street and Daniel).

We will study how Jewish-American authors contributed to traditions of naturalism, realism, modernism, and postmodernism in twentieth-century American fictions. We will also study such topics as anti-Semitism, literary responses to the Holocaust and to the state of Israel , and the rise of Jewish feminism.

Although we will consider how Jewish religion and culture contributed to the literature, this is not a course in religion and you need not be Jewish to take it. An interest in American literature, history, and culture or in the issues of ethnic identity and assimilation is sufficient.

I hope this course will make you a more sensitive interpreter of American culture and a better writer.

Texts:

At Goering’s Books, 1717 NW 1 st Ave, next to Bageland:

At Orange and Blue Texts, 309 NW 13 St, across from Krispy Kreme:

Requirements:

  1. Attendance and participation = 10%.
  2. Quizzes= 20%.
  3. Two papers: Paper 1= 25%; Paper 2= 35%. Paper 1 may be analytic or take the form of a brief fiction parodying the style or extending the narrative of one of the works we read. Paper 1 may be revised if the grade is less than B. Paper 2 is a research paper.
  4. Oral report = 10%.

Note: There will be no midterm or final exam.

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CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

Mary Robison

Course description not available at this time.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 16, 2006 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Poetry

Debora Greger

Text: The only text for this course is Ramazani, Ellmann and O'Clair’s Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, vol. 2 (contemporary). It is available at Goering’s Books and Bagels. The book is required; please do not depend on your fellow students to loan you the text during class.

Course objectives: The course is essentially a workshop; that is, the emphasis will be upon improving your own creative work. The goal of the course is to improve your writing, in terms of the standards by which poetry published in nationally recognized journals is judged. In addition, you should emerge with better critical skills for improving both your own work and that of your classmates. We will work on the assumption that a poet writes for both herself and others.

Turning in work: During the first class, we will all exchange e-mail addresses. Each week I will go over the assignment for the following week. No later than the following Tuesday at noon , each student should send the other students and me a copy of his or her poem by e-mail. If you send the poem by attachment, please also paste a copy into the body of the message. I will comment on each poem and return it during the following class. Save these copies, because I will want to see them again at midterm and at the end of the course as well, when you turn them in along with your notebook. You may occasionally wish to turn in a poem or two in addition to the assignment, perhaps only for my comments, and that is perfectly okay; but, as a rule, only one poem by each student will be discussed each week; some weeks we will not be able to cover all the poems, in which case I will try to make sure we discuss the work of the persons whose poems were missed as soon as possible. This does not apply to students who consistently turn in work late, and students who do this more than a couple of times will have their grade adversely affected. If you have a reason to request that the poem you turn in for a particular week not be discussed in class, or remain anonymous, please make a note to that effect on the poem you turn in to me.

After you have received your classmates’ poems, you should read them carefully, prepare some useful comments, look up any unfamiliar words or allusions, and otherwise do your best to become the ideal reader. Everyone should have plenty to say about any poem if called upon, and I will ask everyone to give the poet their annotated copies including the reader’s name. You should not, however, ask the poet to explain or comment on his or her poem before we do so in class. In general, we will first discuss each poem without the participation of the poet, only afterward turning to the writer for clarification, discussion, or help. This is not a game where prizes will be awarded to the first person to guess the meaning of a particularly obscure piece of writing.

In the first part of class, we will discuss poems by the writers assigned for that week, and we will discuss the particular writing assignment or exercise (if any) for the following week. You should be familiar with the poems from the anthology assigned that week; unless I state otherwise, read all the selections for each poet. From time to time we will have in-class exercises designed to help your writing and explore technical possibilities.

Absences : You are allowed two absences, which must be cleared in advance with me; e-mail me or call me at the office and leave a message. Any uncleared absence (including lateness over 15 minutes) lowers your grade by half a letter. You are responsible for finding out the details of any assignments you miss. If you miss a class, your work for the following week is still due at the ordinary time.

Grades: I will give you an idea of the grade you can expect (assuming you continue working at the same level) when we meet around midterm; at the end of term I will collect from you a notebook with copies of all your work, including my comments, and your own revisions of whichever poems you wish. Up to a point, the more poems you revise successfully, the more positively I am impressed. There are no papers and no exams, and poems and exercises will not be graded individually. Your final grade will be determined by the quality and/or improvement in your writing; by your attendance and participation in class, including your demonstrated preparedness; and by the wit, passion, and seriousness you bring to writing. My quantification of these elements may be somewhat subjective.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 16, 2006 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry

Michael Hofmann

A workshop-cum-poetry-reading class, book or books still to be determined.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 16, 2006 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 4905

Advanced Seminar in Fiction Writing

Jill Ciment

This course is an advanced fiction workshop. Basically, it will be run in the ‘traditional’ workshop fashion with occasional lectures on structure, metaphor, plot, etc. Some writing exercises will be assigned at the beginning, but the primary emphasis is on self-generated work.

Optimally, students will turn in stories that they have taken as far as they can on their own. The workshop should be a venue to test the waters, to try new things, to present first drafts as well as polished works, but only after the writer has struggled with the work to the nth degree. The idea is for students rigorously to challenge themselves. Students not presenting work should take their jobs as critics and editors as seriously as they take their own writing.

Required reading TBA.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 16, 2006 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 4906

Advanced Poetry Writing

Debora Greger

“He is currently writing a book, a sort of saltwater poet travel guide for the coast from Homosassa to Pensacola. ‘It’s going to have the information that poets really need – how wide is the boat ramp? Is there fuel? Is there enough room in the motel parking lot to park your trailer? Can you turn the car and trailer around in the restaurant parking lot? Do you need to wear socks?’ he said.

“But it will also include tackle and techniques, good spots and hazards. Thompson will also operate a concurrent website, because conditions – and property – along the coast can change and information will need to be updated.

“‘Hurricanes come and go,’ he reasoned.”

Prerequisite: CRW 3310 or permission of instructor.

No manuscript submission required.

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ENC 3310

Advanced Exposition

Wayne Losano

This is a standard, traditional (old-fashioned) composition course focusing on familiar rhetorical modes of development (narrative, description, analysis, etc.) with a heavy emphasis on style and rhetorical effectiveness and perhaps a nod towards “creative nonfiction.” Four or five papers plus analysis of selected essays and assorted in-class writing activities.

No one who has missed the first three hours of class will be permitted to take this class.

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ENC 3310

Advanced Exposition

Brian McCrea

Course description not available at this time.

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ENC 3312

Advanced Argumentative Writing

Raúl Sánchez

This course offers precept and practice in written argumentation.

In the beginning, we will meet thrice weekly to read and discuss a major treatise on rhetoric (possibly Aristotle’s contribution to the subject).

After this period, and for the remainder of the semester, we will meet twice weekly to discuss specific issues of composition, including invention and prose style. In addition, the class will be apportioned into groups of two or three students, and these groups will meet with me each week to review each person's writing.

Assignments may include the following:

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ENC 4956

Overseas Studies

Undergraduate Coordinator

Prerequisite: This course must be approved by the Undergraduate Coordinator before the student travels overseas. It may be repeated with a change of topic up to a maximum of 15-credit hours.

This study, which may count towards the English major, involves course work taken as part of an approved study abroad program.

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ENG 3011

Roland Barthes

Ed White

The career of Roland Barthes offers a fascinating overview of contemporary cultural theory, ranging from structuralism and narratology, to materialist semiotics, to postructuralism and queer theory, to cultural studies of music, fashion, and photography. In the words of one reader, “Barthes interests us precisely because he is stimulating, and it is hard to separate what engages us in his work from his perpetual attempt to adopt new perspectives, to break with habitual perceptions. A lasting commitment to particular projects would have made Barthes a less productive thinker.”

This course will provide an introduction to critical theory through the work of Barthes (emphasis on introduction: no great familiarity with theory is assumed or expected). This will also be a writing intensive course, with weekly writing assignments rather than one or two concentrated projects; a central goal of the course is the improvement of your critical writing skills.

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ENG 3063

Advanced Grammar: Theory and Application

Wayne Losano

This course is intended primarily for students planning to be writing teachers or professional editors who will need to know essential terminology and reasons for grammatical changes to enhance their credibility as teachers and editors. We will cover as many aspects of formal grammar as we can cram into one semester, covering topics ranging from parts of speech and sentence patterns to diagramming, modification, and rhetorical grammar. No exams or major papers are required but some work – take-home or in-class exercises, editing work, reading tests, etc. – will be required for every class, and the final grade will be based simply on the success of these accumulated activities.

No one who has missed the first three hours of class will be permitted to take this class.

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ENG 3122

Film History II

Maureen Turim

We will examine the international history of film from the introduction of sound through the sixties. The goal is to awaken an understanding of the historical use of film form by exploring changes that have taken place in film industries and technologies. Each week, we will view a film, examine its form of expression (looking closely at editing, set design, acting styles, dialogue, and narration). This will lead to our discussion of the film’s place in film history, as well as social history. We will look at issues of industry and audience, considering representations of gender, race and political change. Students will learn how to see films with a greater depth of visual understanding. Films to be screened include genres of Hollywood filmmaking, Independents, European, and Japanese films. We will look at directors whose talent shaped the development of cinema; we will also examine the role of actors and actresses, screenwriters, designers and producers in shaping the history of film.

Goals: A greater understanding of film history, form, and analysis, and increased knowledge of the US and international film industries. Greater knowledge of social context and history will also be a goal.

Course Requirements: One paper of 8 pages, using historical analysis of film, and short answer exams on readings, lecture material and scenes from films. Participation in class discussion will also be required, as will WebCT participation.

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ENG 4015

Psychological Approaches

Peter L. Rudnytsky

The course will focus on the theme of memory through a close reading of two works: William Wordsworth’s The Prelude and Nobel-prize winner Eric Kandel’s In Search of Memory. Both works, one literary and the other scientific, combine autobiography with theoretical reflection on the nature of mind and memory. In addition to studying each of these texts for its own sake, we will consider how their convergence of perspectives provides a context for understanding psychoanalysis, as exemplified by Freud’s paper, “Screen Memories.” Course requirements include a midterm, final, and one eight- to twelve-page term paper.

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ENG 4060

History of the English Language

James Paxson

The History of the English Language traces the origins and development of English from prehistoric times to the present. About a third of the course will therefore treat the emergence and structure of Old English (with grammatical study adequate to read some Old English prose) and Middle English. However, because the linguistic study of English leans more towards preparation in the study of modern texts, the course will concentrate on the development of early modern literary English and on contemporary (and especially American) literary or dialectal forms. Main texts will therefore include C.M. Millward’s A Biography of English and Bill Bryson’s Made in America: An Informal History of the English Language in the United States. Course work will include three projects – the first involving training in the use of the Oxford English Dictionary; the second, a take-home midterm detailing phonological, grammatical and semantic changes in a specimen of Middle English prose translated by you into Modern English; and the third, a work in philological criticism on a literary text of your choice.

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ENG 4110

Children’s Film

Anastasia Ulanowicz

While, as adults, we occasionally watch children’s films in the company of young children, or as an exercise in nostalgia, or “just for fun,” we seldom think about how such films are produced, or what a surprisingly enormous role they play in shaping the culture in which we live. In the course of this semester, we will pay close attention to both the formal elements of children’s films and the ways such elements function and interact in order to transmit and sustain dominant cultural values. Our semester will be divided into three parts. During the first part of the semester, we will study animation – the form that is perhaps most conventionally associated with children’s film. How, we will ask, does animation “work”? How is it produced? What are its key elements? Why do we associate it with children and childhood, and what do we make of those animated films (such as Spirited Away or the Triplets of Belville) that seem to be aimed more toward adult audiences than toward child audiences? During the second part of the semester, we will analyze key elements of both animated and live-action film – such as sound, color, mise-en-scene and editing – as we study how such elements work together to produce narrative and to disseminate ideological assumptions regarding gender, race, class, and sexuality. Finally, in the third part of the semester, we will discuss film in relation to various audiences and aesthetic forms. For example, what might we make of films featuring child actors and protagonists that are produced for decidedly adult audiences? How might we evaluate film adaptations of children’s books? And what relationships might we observe between children’s film and the “teenpic”?

The texts for this class include Paul Wells’s Understanding Animation and David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson’s Film Art; there will also be a course-book that will include various critical and theoretical readings. We will watch a number of films in class, including (but not limited to) Fantasia, Cinderella, Spirited Away, The Littlest Rebel, Annie, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, and Dirty Dancing.

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ENG 4110

Jacques Tati

Sylvie Blum

“In a world of increasing conformity, the modern eccentric can be seen as a contemporary hero and guardian of individualism.” (Schulman)

The course as designed examines Tati’s career and contribution, his cinematic antecedents and heirs. Topics cover France’s culture at the time of the production of his films, i.e. post-World War II France of the late 40s, 50s and 60s. Readings, discussion and analysis will bear on contemporary literature and cultural production, everyday life, the use of space and architecture in film, the use of technology, the function of music and sound or silence in film, comedies, the representation of the male hero in French cinema, rural cinema and what I propose to read as a “Tati moment.”

Tentative Required Reading

  1. A comprehensive course pack including essays by André Bazin, Philip Brophy, Kristin Thompson, Lee Hilliker, John Fawell, Lucy Fischer, Henri Lefèbvre, Peter Schulman, Pierre Sorlin, and Jacques Tati. (etc.)
  2. Michel Chion. The Films of Jacques Tati. Trans. Antonio D’ Alfonso Toronto: Guernica, 2003.
  3. David Bellos. Tati: His Life and Art. London: Harvill, 1999. PN 1998. 3 T374 B45

Requirements: Bi-weekly reading quizzes, bi-monthly reaction papers and a final 15–20 pp. research project.

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ENG 4133

Screenwriting

Mary Robison

Course description not available at this time.

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ENG 4133

Polish Science Fiction and Fantasy: Fiction, Films, Artwork

Christopher Caes

This course is crosslisted with PLT 3930 (6802) – Special Topics in Polish Studies and with EUS 3100 (6752) – Special Topics in European Studies. General Education Credit H & I pending.

This course introduces and examines one of the most imaginative and currently vibrant artistic currents of modern Polish culture – fantastyka, or “the fantastic,” in two of its most popular guises: science fiction and fantasy.  Our focus in the course will be twofold. Firstly, developing a conceptual “tool kit” from the writing of Polish science fiction grandmaster Stanisław Lem, we will inquire into (and experience) the pleasure-giving dimensions of these genres, attempting some structural definitions and highlighting the peculiar blend of cognitive or metaphysical ambition and horror that defines the Polish fantastic. Secondly, considering representations of other worlds as unique reflections of this world, we will attempt to identify and investigate specific historical and social factors – from wartime catastrophe and communist censorship to the commercialization of publishing and availability of new computer technologies – that have led Poles to practice the genres of the fantastic.

Selected works will be drawn from three different media: fiction, film, and artwork. We will begin with tales by two classic practitioners of the fantastic – the supernatural fiction of Stefan Grabiński and the science fiction of Stanisław Lem. Later, we will turn to works of science fiction and fantasy by current authors – the metaphysical horror fiction of Marek Huberath, the Tolkienesque world of Andrzej Sapkowski, and the science fiction of Jacek Dukaj. We will also be viewing film adaptations of Lem’s fiction by Maetzig, Tarkovsky, and Soderbergh, as well as screening works from the dark existential sf cinema of Andrzej Żuławski, the oneiric cinema of Wojciech Has and the sociological science fiction films of Piotr Szulkin. Finally, we will look at the nightmare painting of Zdzisław Beksiński, the “fantastic hyperrealism” of artist/illustrator Wojtek Siudmak, the Escheresque fantasy painting of Jacek Yerka, the neobaroque fantasy painting of Tomasz Sętowski, as well as at digital sci-fi art by a number of contemporary Polish artists – Czarny, Drozd, Jasiczak, and Wojtowicz.

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ENG 4133

Son of Psycho-Cinem-analysis

Richard Burt

Why did the Enlightenment fail? Why is politics beyond the reach of reason? We will pursue these and similar questions by dialectically reading pyschoanalytic and media theory in relation to a series of films that engage fantasies of national (in)security and communications breakdowns or failures – along with their consequent catastrophes and disasters – in terms of analogies these films draw between media (the telephone, audio recording devices, silent film, automatic writing, and so on) and psychic processes (memory lapses, amnesia, slips of the tongue, telepathy, hypnosis, resistance, repression, the unconscious, deja vu, the uncanny, repetition compulsion, and so on). Our focus will be on the ways in which intrapsychic rather than interpsychic dynamics primarily block a passage from fantasy to understanding, and we will explore the close relationship between stupidity and wisdom, the desire not to know as much as the desire to know. For more information, please go to: <http://www.clas.ufl.edu/~rburt/sonofpsychocinemanalysis/>.

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ENG 4133

Medievalism on Film

Richard Burt

We will examine the Middle Ages on film in relation to medieval media that have been regarded as proto-cinematic.  For more information, please go to: <http://www.clas.ufl.edu/~rburt/Medieval_Film_and_Media/>.

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ENG 4134

Women and Film

Maureen Turim

This course will examine how women have been represented in film, how they have participated in film production, and how they consume film images. We will look at various feminist approaches and the range of debates as to how to address these issues.

The course will have several goals: to introduce you to the history of women in film, to increase your skills in reading film and in reading critical writing about film, and to enhance your understanding of the relation between writing critical analysis and feminist theory.

Emphasis will be on such basic issues as viewer identification and cultural context as currently formulated through various feminist and post-structuralist methodologies. We will explore how feminism intersects with psychoanalysis, ideology, deconstruction and related approaches. We will examine the conjuncture of theoretical issues with an experience of specific texts, and the function of these texts in the past and present workings of history.

Course Requirements: Two papers of 8 pages each (35% and 35%), plus class discussion and miscellaneous assignments (30%). Participation in class discussion is essential. WebCT participation as well. Students must attend scheduled screenings.

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ENG 4135

New German Cinima

Barbara Mennel

An introduction to “New German Cinema” from its inception in the 1960’s to its demise and its subsequent legacy, both in filmmaking and criticism.

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ENG 4905

Independent Study

Faculty Member of Choice

An Independent Study course may be taken for 1 to 3 credit hours, but will only count toward the fulfillment of the 10-course requirement for the English major if a student registers for 3 credit hours.

This course is for advanced students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The student must find a faculty member who is willing to supervise the semester-long study, and together, the two create a project. The student must meet with the professor at designated times, agreed upon in advance, and complete all assignments in a timely manner.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: The Brain and the Book

Norman Holland

I plan to open up what I take to be a fundamental question in literary studies. How does your brain make stories, movies, poems, and plays into pleasure? Along the way, we will consider other basic issues like the “willing suspension of disbelief” (why don’t you doubt the reality of Spider-Man?); why you feel real emotions toward people and events you know are not real; the reality of literary characters; how form works; the effect of being in an audience; how readers build “content;” how writers acquire a style; the nature of creativity; the ethical function of literature; why all cultures do literature – is it genetic?

This seminar comes out of the last three decades’ explosion of knowledge about the brain. It will explore a relatively new field, the application of cognitive science and neuropsychology to our understanding of literary creation and response. We will not be reading literature as such – I assume you have done a lot of that – but we will be discussing your experience as readers. We shall be reading such people as Noam Chomsky, George Lakoff, Mark Johnson, Hanna and Antonio Damasio, Jerry Fodor, Heinz Lichtenstein, Steven Pinker, Mark Solms, John Tooby and Leda Cosmides. And we will be reading some people who have begun to apply their ideas to literary and aesthetic questions: Nancy Aiken, Ellen Dissanayake, Patrick Hogan, Mark Turner, Ellen Winner, and Norman Holland. Students will be asked to learn a certain amount about brains, but I will keep this neuroscience to a necessary minimum.

Because a term paper is not appropriate for this level of this subject, I plan to give an hour exam and a final exam. If the seminar so votes, I will also assign reports on outside reading. Grades will be based on those plus participation in online and class discussion.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Black Female-Centered Film

Mark A. Reid

This course employs a comparative approach to study narrative and non-narrative films made about black women in the Americas, Europe, and Africa. Most of the film screenings cover films made by black women directors and screenwriters. However, the course also includes a few films made by non-black and/or male filmmakers.

Lectures and discussions will consider how the films explore generational, gendered, racial, religious, and class conflicts that result from immigration, globalization, and western education. Ideas about ethnicity, race, nation, class, gender and sexuality will be discussed in relation to how they transform notions about Africa and its diasporas in Europe and the Americas. Students are expected to learn and correctly employ film and theoretical terminology when they discuss and write about black female-centered film.

Students will analyze how various types of films imitate, appropriate, and/or resist the dominant representational regimes that determine black female subjectivity. The course introduces cultural theory and contemporary film history. Students will leave this course with a sharpened critical understanding of how black female filmmakers and video artists visually imitate, appropriate, and or resist certain dominant representational paradigms

Requirements:

  1. Ten submissions of a two-page, typed single-space reaction paper on the weekly readings, class discussions, and films due weeks 2-11. 20%
  2. Moderate two 15-minute discussions on a weekly reading and film screening. 20%
  3. Submission of a typed 15-18-page research paper and two-page bibliography-filmography. After obtaining the written approval of the instructor, a 15-minute video project may be submitted in lieu of the 15-18-page research paper. All students are responsible for a two-page bibliography-filmography. 40%
  4. Present a 15-minute oral presentation on the 15-18-page research paper or the 10-15-minute video project. 20%

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Sympathy and the Politics of the Body

Julie Kim

Today, we tend to think of sympathy as a well-meaning, relatively harmless, and even insipid feeling of pity or compassion. In eighteenth-century Britain and the Americas, however, it had a far more complex and curious set of associations that shed light on theories of feeling, emotion, and the body, past and present. In this course, we will explore some of these theories, which included a quasi-magical belief in magnetic and animal attractions between individuals, as well as the idea that feelings could be transfused or passed through the blood from one person to another. Writers on sympathy also invented the concept of the nervous system, which came to be seen as the conveyor of both physical and emotional feeling and thus the central organ of the body. Simultaneously, the nervous system became a prominent metaphor for society as a whole, and political theories of sympathy became popular, as various writers posited that problems ranging from national fragmentation to slavery, class conflict, and gender inequality could be solved if people’s feelings and bodies could only be controlled properly. We will think about how this politics of the body worked and impacted specific individuals and their bodies, including those of women, men, slaves, and members of different socioeconomic classes. We will also compare eighteenth-century and present-day notions of sympathy and emotion to think about how our own politics of the body have changed or remained the same.

Eighteenth-century readings will include

We will also read critical works by Markman Ellis, Julia Stern, Michelle Burnham, Michel Foucault, and Elaine Scarry, among others.

Assignments will include weekly responses, a midterm paper, and a final research project.

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ENG 4940

Internship

Undergraduate Coordinator

The English Department at the University of Florida offers three* credit hours of internship to its majors who provide the following to the Undergraduate Coordinator for approval:

Once the Undergraduate Coordinator has approved the internship requested by the student, the department will register the student for the internship credits.

Upon completion of the internship:

*For two credit hours, the student would need to work 8 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 16 hours per week for Summer A or B.

*For one credit hour, the student would need to work 4 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 8 hours per week for Summer A or B.

Please note the following limitations on the English Internship:

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ENG 4953

Department Seminar: Joyce and Cultural Studies

Brandon Kershner

The course will be an introduction both to James Joyce and to the broad field of cultural studies, using Joyce’s fictions as examples of literary texts with particularly rich cultural resonance – both representationally and as artifacts. We will read Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist, and Ulysses in conjunction with a cultural studies reader. Our emphases will include the areas of

Although the course will engage with theory, the stress will be upon specific implications of the literary texts rather than upon the theory in and for itself. As an aid in reading Ulysses, we will use Blamires’s guide to that novel entitled The New Bloomsday Book. I may bring in copies of newspapers and advertisements of the time as well as some examples of the popular reading to which Joyce alludes, show slides of Eugen Sandow the bodybuilder and memorial photography of children, and discuss other examples of material culture from turn-of-the-century Ireland. Since I am involved in the production of a hypertext Ulysses, we will discuss aspects of that project throughout the course, as it relates to issues raised by cultural studies.

Texts: The Norton Critical edition of Dubliners (ed. Norris) and the Bedford Books second edition of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (ed. Kershner); Hans Walter Gabler’s edition of Ulysses and Harry Blamires’s The New Bloomsday Book; I will also be distributing a good deal of material as handouts during the course. All books are at Goering’s Books and Bagels.

Requirements: (1, 2) Two papers incorporating literary-critical research, the first 8–10 pages long, the second 10–12 pages. (3) A final exam, including objective and essay sections. (4) About three or four unannounced quizzes – very simple ones – to make sure we're all keeping up with the reading. These four requirements will weigh roughly the same in determining 85% of your grade; an additional 15% will be determined by class participation.

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ENG 4953

Department Seminar: The Journal

Debora Greger

“On Michaelmas day I went to see the Collection of a Noble Venetian Signor Rugini: . . . a Cabinet of Medals both Latine & Greeke, with divers curious shells, & two fair Pearles in 2 of them: but above all, he abounded in things petrified, Walnuts, Eggs, in which the Yealke rattl’d, a Peare, a piece of beefe, with the bones in it; an whole hedg-hog . . .”

– the diary of John Evelyn, 1645

“Should you wish to make sure that your birthday will be celebrated three hundred years hence, your best course is undoubtedly to keep a diary.”

– Virginia Woolf, no mean diarist herself, on John Evelyn

This course will be an exploration, via reading and writing, of the diary and the journal. Why are most blogs boring? Who will be the great diary- and journal-keepers of the twenty-first century? You?

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ENG 4970

Honors Thesis Project

Faculty members (2) of Choice

Students must have have completed at least one semester of ENG 4936, Honors Seminar. Open to English Honors students.

The student must select two faculty members: one to direct the reading, research, and writing of a thesis on a topic of the student’s and director’s chosing, and another as the second reader. An abstract (100 to 200 words) and one copy of the thesis (30 to 50 pages) must be delivered to the CLAS Academic Advising Center on Fletcher Road at least 10 days before graduation.

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ENL 3112

18th Century British Novel

Brian McCrea

The theme for this semester will be good sex/good families. In the past twenty-five years, influential historians and literary scholars have described the eighteenth century as a period that witnesses the rise of “companionate marriage” and new versions of masculinity. We will look at a wide range of eighteenth-century British novels and analyze how they portray male and female roles in courtship and marriage.

We will read seven novels, one of them being Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa. Because of the length of Clarissa, we will take it in sections, reading roughly one hundred pages per week. We will study how these novels reflect and speak to changes in British society described by Aphra Behn in her late seventeenth-century prose narratives Oroonoko and The Fair Jilt. Most particularly, we will analyze the changing role of social status (which these writers typically use the word “quality” to reference) in courtship and marriage, as economic and social changes create new kinds of wealth. But we also will observe how these novels repeat plots and characters of earlier literature, notably the birth-mystery plot. By the end of the semester, students should have a full sense of these novels as, at once, products of a specific culture and of a long-enduring literary tradition.

Students will write two papers (between six to eight pages each) on topics that I offer. They also will keep a response journal in which they record their reactions to their daily readings. If the class is small enough (under twenty students), that journal will provide the basis for a one-half hour final oral examination. Should the class enroll more than twenty students, a written final examination will be offered. Students will be expected to participate in a Clarissa study group and to contribute to class discussions.

All papers must be word-processed. I am happy to read and comment upon early drafts of papers and encourage e-mail submission of them via attachments in richtext format.

Books:

All books will be available at Goering’s Books and Bagels, 1711 N. W. 1 st Avenue.

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ENL 3122

19th Century British Novel

Pamela Gilbert

This is a tentative description.

The Course:

This course samples key developments in the British novel through the nineteenth century. We will examine the novels within three contexts: historical, literary-historical, and critical. If you have not had English 2022, you should plan to familiarize yourself with the period: the Norton Anthology introduction to the period is a good place to start. Gilmour’s and Houghton’s books are also very useful and are on reserve in the library.

The Victorian period was the great age of the novel’s emergence as a dominant popular form within a newly extensive literary marketplace, and Victorian novelists were consummate entertainers driven to sell widely and well. They were also preoccupied with the condition of their own culture; to paraphrase Richard Altick, rarely is the Present so much present in literature as it is in the novel of this period. Victorian novelists considered it their duty and pleasure to criticize, praise and generally comment upon current issues, and they developed new forms and genres to accommodate their purposes. These issues represent the formative phases of social concerns which we have inherited and which still define us: the role of mass media, the ethics of capitalism, gender roles, the responsibilities of liberal government, the welfare state, pollution, the role of nation in the global community, etc. We will read a range of representative genres and consider them not only in the light of the emergence of the novel as a dominant form, but as documents of a culture’s attempts to represent and work out these issues of contemporary importance – aesthetically and ethically – and consider the ways in which Victorian ideas resonate for us today.

This course provides upper-division credit in the major, and will be taught with that in mind; therefore, students will be expected to know how to do research in the field and to attempt the application of critical frameworks. Due to the nature of the material, there is a considerable amount of reading. Carefully consider your reading speed and the expectations of the other courses you are taking before committing to this course.

Attendance and Participation:

The most important “materials” in any class are the insights and knowledge that the class members bring to the information being discussed. In a sense, if a class member does not participate in discussion and related activities, that person is depriving the rest of the memembers of the class of one of the most important components of their education. Your participation is very important to everyone here.

If you must miss class, be sure to arrange to get the notes from a classmate. Poor participation or attendance will affect your grade; given that every absence is a week missed, more than one absence or two latenesses will lower your grade.

Grading:

Grading will reflect University standards, and will be based largely on the papers and the quizzes, as well as timely completion of non-graded activities. Poor attendance will lower your course grade, as will poor performance on quizzes and non-graded activities. Plagiarism is an automatic “F” in the course. You are responsible for understanding the definition of plagiarism – “ignorance of the law” is not an acceptable excuse.

Papers:

There will be two essays. The first will be approximately six pages. The second will be approximately twelve pages. You are expected to do reading/research beyond the assigned reading for these papers, which should demonstrate an original and critical engagement with a research topic. Papers should NOT re-present material from lecture or discussion, although they may use that material as a point of departure. Late papers will receive grade penalties. Essays will be typed, double-spaced, with one inch margins in a normal typing font (e.g. Times New Roman), with a point size of 10 (Courier)-12 (Times New Roman).

Discussion:

Because of the nature of the class and its upper division status, this class will be based on discussion and in-class activities. Each student is expected to participate – to speak in class, to answer and ask questions and to come prepared each day. I may call on students as a normal part of the class process. It is acceptable to make mistakes or not to know the answer to questions; it is not acceptable to give up or refuse to try.

Please do not underestimate the value of class participation. I don’t grade separately for discussion because it is a basic requirement of the course, like coming regularly or turning in papers on time. However, as with those other basic requirements, your responsible completion of them can push a “split grade” higher, whereas failing to take those responsibilities seriously will result in a substantially lowered grade, regardless of your performance on graded exercises.

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ENL 3154

Modern British Poetry

Marsha Bryant

The poets we will assess in this course reflect the onslaught of cultural changes that shaped the 20th century. We begin with Yeats, who responded to Irish nationalism and revolution, and then move to Wilfred Owen, the most famous poet of the Great War, which would kill him in 1918. In Eliot’s long poem The Waste Land, modernist innovation and postwar disillusionment combined in a vivid simulation of cultural decline. W. H. Auden’s work of the 1930s captured the sense of impending crisis that would erupt at the outbreak of WWII, while Stevie Smith’s darkly comic poems and drawings challenged restrictive gender roles in the years between the wars. Philip Larkin’s poems cast a cynical eye on modern romance and Britain’s diminished role on the world stage after WWII. For Ted Hughes, violence became the defining feature of our relationships with one another and with the natural world. Craig Raine portrayed an alien domesticity in the late 1970s, reflecting the tensions of changing gender roles during the rise of career women. In the 1980s, Carol Ann Duffy revitalized the dramatic monologue to give voice to women and immigrants. Course assignments include an explication and term paper, a sonnet, parody, and a panel presentation.

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ENL 3241

The Romantic Period

James Twitchell

This is an undergraduate survey of English romantic writers. It is roughly divided into nine parts: an introduction to romanticism, and then eight sections on individual writers. There is, relative to other English courses, little outside reading, as the main concern of the course is a careful reading of selected representative works. This is deceptive, for students might assume that the course will therefore be easy. There will be weekly quizzes (embarrassingly objective for an English course) and two short papers (not necessarily research papers). The quizzes give me a chance to get answers to questions I think are important; the papers give you a chance to form answers to questions you think are important. The class is informal and relaxed, but the quizzes and papers are not. The quizzes stress material covered in class and so it might be suggested that you take good and careful notes.

Texts

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ENL 4221

17th Century Prose and Poetry (excluding Milton)

Kristen Smith

In this course we will be reading what are often regarded as the greatest lyrics along with some of the finest, most diversified prose in English. We will attend first to understanding the literature, and second to establishing contexts within which and approaches from which to read and write about it. Students will be responsible for twelve unannounced quizzes or brief take-home assignments and three papers. The brief unannounced quizzes/take-home assignments will occur intermittently and take a variety of forms (40% of the grade); one may be dropped. The three papers should be tightly argued, fully exemplified, and persuasively styled (each is to be approximately 2,500 words long and is worth 20% of the grade). One will interpret some piece of prose; another will interpret a single or several related secular lyrics of the era not covered in class; a last will interpret a single or several related sacred lyrics of the era not covered in class.

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ENL 4221

Milton

Peter L. Rudnytsky

The course will consist of a close reading of Milton’s epic poems, Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained. The approach will be primarily theological and psychological, with attention to gender issues. No previous background in Milton is required, but some experience in reading poetry and curiosity about Renaissance literature would be helpful. Course requirements include a weekly one-page response paper, with a possible term-paper option, and a final examination.

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare

Robert Thomson

This course will involve a close study of a dozen or so of the plays and a number of readings from the poems and elsewhere. Emphasis will be laid upon the problem-stating – solving – mediating nature of the dramas. This will necessitate a close reading of the texts; a recognition of the dramatic and verbal ironies that abound; close attention to the paradoxes and ambiguities which motivate the actions and observation of the stark oppositions which are continually reiterated.

We will be led into a contextual study of both the world within and the world without the Elizabethan theatre, with its concern for an orderliness and its doubts and confusions as the new seventeenth-century learning questioned and undermined the values and social/political /religious assumptions of its society. We may then come to appreciate how these great plays and poems still speak to us with immediacy after a span of nearly four hundred years.

I intend to spend time with the following plays and, in addition, may spare more than a passing glance at one or two others – particularly making use, at the beginning of the course, of the early plays Titus Andronicus and Richard III and also The Sonnets

The Text for the course is The Norton Shakespeare edited by Stephen Greenblatt and others. It is in stock at Goering’s Bookstore. Any recent and annotated text would suffice but since I will be giving references to the texts in the above edition and occasionally referring to its introductory essays and bibliographies, it would be perhaps more prudent to use the recommended text. Throughout the course of the semester, I will draw your attention to particularly noteworthy essays and critical studies from the lists given by Greenblatt in his text. My intention is not simply to display my own preferences and prejudices, but also to let you know where much of the substance of my discussions of the plays comes from. In addition, I will frequently offer you recommended readings of recent criticism that has been published since our text went to press, particularly those arising from new historicist, feminist, psychological and anthropological approaches to the texts. I will also take it upon myself to advise you of the more useful websites I have encountered, particularly those that offer bibliographical, critical and explicatory information.

Assignments

Two essays will be required of you (each ca. 2500 words) and, in addition, there will be a number of in-class tests. There will be no final exam.

Oral participation will be expected and rewarded. Absences – I intend to make periodic register checks – will be penalized, as will late papers. Plagiarism which is detected will result in a failing grade for the course.

If at any time you need to see me or discuss a problem, I can be reached on the phone, 392-1060 ext 267. My office (Turlington 4342) hours will be 8:00 through 9:00 each morning of classes or by appointment. I can also be reached by email: <rthomson@english.ufl.edu>.

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare: Learning by Doing

Sidney Homan

The assumption in all my theatre courses is that the text of a play is not just what is written on the page, but that text in performance, delivered by actors before an audience. This means the play’s text also includes gestures, movement, blocking (the stage picture), and sub-text (what the character is saying inwardly, beneath the lines delivered onstage, as well as the “history” for that character invented by the actor). In the theatre, we would further supplement this text with lighting, sound, set, costumes, props, and make-up. To be sure, one can approach a play in a thousand ways – as literature, as a repository for the thinking of an age, as the springboard for political or cultural issues. But, since I work both on campus and in the theatre, as an actor and director, and since the theatre itself is a unique medium with its own aesthetic principles, I approach the plays, with my students, and as a fellow “student,” as something meant to be performed by an actor and ratified by an audience. In my courses, each student has a scene partner with whom he or she stages several scenes each semester. Once performed, the class and I, as co-directors, “work” that scene with the two actors, trying out options, rehearsing it. This is a challenge, to be sure, but students, no matter what their background, should have no anxiety about doing things this way for, historically in my courses, Mechanical Engineering majors have done no worse than Theatre students who have done no better than those working in English or Anthropology. The emphasis, therefore, is on learning by doing, and I judge student work by intent, what goes into the performance – not by finesse. If there is finesse, that is considered a bonus.

In my Shakespeare course, we will thus consider A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Macbeth, The Taming of the Shrew, Othello, Much Ado about Nothing, and Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, which, of course, offers a playwright’s critique of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. During the semester students will also see a production, An Evening with Tom Stoppard, at the Acrosstown Repertory Theatre. There is a major course paper assessing your work as actor and using your own performance as the subject.

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LIN 4605

World Englishes

Roger Thompson

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 3003

Narratology of New Media

Terry Harpold

A survey of critical and theoretical issues posed by narrative genres and operations of interactive digital media. Authors whose literary and critical-theoretical works we will read include: Seymour Chatman, Megan Heyward, Shelley Jackson, Michael Joyce, Nick Montfort, Stuart Moulthrop, Raymond Queneau, and Marie-Laure Ryan. A highlight of the course will be “World Building: Space and Community,” a two-day conference on games and digital media held at UF, March 1–2, 2007.

Students should have a basic knowledge of the WWW and other interactive digital media. All students must have access to a desktop computer system (Windows XP or Vista, Mac OS X) outside of the class meeting times. Course requirements include two take-home exams.

Please take note: this is not a “videogames course”. We will undertake careful, systematic narratological analysis of representative texts of the emerging digital field. A devotee of videogames or interactive fiction will have no more advantage in this course than would an enthusiast of popular films in a course on cinema theory and criticism. Critical readings for the course will be challenging; the digital texts we will discuss will require at least as much of your attention and time as an equal number of long and complex print narratives.

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LIT 3041

Tudor/Stuart Drama

Randi Smith

We will read about one non-Shakespearean play per week from the greatest era for English drama, perhaps the greatest era for drama in any language – from the middle of Elizabeth’s reign to the closing of the theaters in 1642. We will focus on understanding these plays in a number of contexts such as stage conditions; illusion/reality/representation; language, rhetoric, and style; the development of techniques and genres; and social, political, and theological conditions.

The course will proceed along lines of generic development throughout the period. In the first part we will read tragedies by Kyd, Marlow, Webster, and others; in the second, comedies by Dekker, Beaumont, Jonson, and others; in the third, Marston. Throughout the course, students will take 11 unannounced brief quizzes (40% of the grade). At the end of each part, students will be responsible for a paper: Paper I on a tragedy (about 3,000 words, 15% of the grade) Paper II on a comedy (about 3,000 words, 20% of the grade), Paper III on any non-Shakespearean play of the era not assigned to the class (about 5,000 words, 25% of the grade).

Our focus will be on developing students’ skills and knowledge towards two ends: first, in order to enjoy reading knowledgably and independently such famous plays as The Spanish Tragedy, Tamburlaine I, The Duchess of Malfi, The Shoemakers Holiday, Bartholomew Fair, A King and No King; second, in order to speak and write convincingly.

The full syllabus is posted to my web page. Taking a Shakespeare course alongside this one could prove valuable for both.

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LIT 3041

Modern Tragedy

Melvin New

We will read some 17 modern tragedies (20th century) in an attempt to come to some understanding of the genre and of the modern era. Plays by Brecht, Hellman, Ibsen, Lorca, Miller, O’Neill, Pirandello, Soyinka, Strindberg, Synge, and Williams will be read, and, as well, five plays by Anton Chekhov. We will read these plays as written texts, with maximum attention paid to the words on the page, minimal attention to staging. Written work, as is always true in English courses, will be required.

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LIT 3043

Modern Drama: Learning by Doing

Sidney Homan

The assumption in all my theatre courses is that the text of a play is not just what is written on the page, but that text in performance, delivered by actors before an audience. This means the play’s text also includes gestures, movement, blocking (the stage picture), and sub-text (what the character is saying inwardly, beneath the lines delivered onstage, as well as the “history” for that character invented by the actor). In the theatre, we would further supplement this text with lighting, sound, set, costumes, props, and make-up. To be sure, one can approach a play in a thousand ways – as literature, as a repository for the thinking of an age, as the springboard for political or cultural issues. But, since I work both on campus and in the theatre, as an actor and director, and since the theatre itself is a unique medium with its own aesthetic principles, I approach the plays, with my students, and as a fellow “student,” as something meant to be performed by an actor and ratified by an audience. In my courses, each student has a scene partner with whom he or she stages several scenes each semester. Once performed, the class and I, as co-directors, “work” that scene with the two actors, trying out options, rehearsing it. This is a challenge, to be sure, but students, no matter what their background, should have no anxiety about doing things this way for, historically in my courses, Mechanical Engineering majors have done no worse than Theatre students who have done no better than those working in English or Anthropology. The emphasis, therefore, is on learning by doing, and I judge student work by intent, what goes into the performance – not by finesse. If there is finesse, that is considered a bonus.

In my Modern Drama course, we will look at Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Pinter’s Old Times and No Man’s Land, and Shepard’s True West and Curse of the Starving Class. There is a major course paper assessing your work as actor and using your own performance as the subject. Students will also see two productions at the Acrosstown Repertory Theatre – An Evening with Tom Stoppard and An Evening with Harold Pinter.

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LIT 3374

The Bible as Literature

Richard Brantley

The Old Testament (Hebrew Scriptures) is emphasized. The approach is historical and formalistic. Topics include: narrative (Samuel, Judges, Ruth, Jonah, Genesis); prophecy (Amos, Hosea, Jeremiah, Isaiah); poetry (Psalms, Lamentations, Song of Solomon); and wisdom literature (Ecclesiastes, Job). Two six-page papers are required, or one twelve-page paper. Directions for the midterm and the noncumulative final are as follows: “Identify the following fifteen passages in no more than two sentences. Comment on two. Take class discussion into account and go beyond it.” The text is the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible.

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LIT 3383

Women’s Poetry

Marsha Bryant

The term “women’s poetry” isn’t as simple as it appears. It is the same thing as “feminist” poetry? Does domesticity restrict or expand women’s poetry? Does women’s poetry always challenge literary tradition, or counter popular culture? How does the “women’s poetry” label affect the ways we read, and how should it? In this course, we will study poetry by Edna Saint Vincent Millay, Gertrude Stein, H.D., Stevie Smith, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sylvia Plath, Rita Dove, and Julia Alvarez. We will also place the poems in biographical and cultural contexts. Assignments include 3 analytical papers (explication, anthology review, cultural analysis), a panel presentation, and a parody.

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LIT 3383

African Women Writers

R. Lugano

This course is crosslisted with SSA4930  (0377) and WST 4930 (5110).

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 3400

Internet Literature

Greg Ulmer

The topic for this seminar is the relationship of technology to literature. Specifically, we will focus on what happens to literary forms in the medium of the World Wide Web. Our interest in part is in the migration of print forms and modes onto the Internet, and also in the emergence of new forms of creativity native to the Internet.

The course is taught in the Networked Writing Environment (NWE), with the primary project being the composition of two Websites. We will experiment with the design of a new mode of literary study that takes advantage of the resources of hypermedia. The semester project is to design and test the “learning screen,” that does for Web media what the “research paper” did for print education. The Web projects call for basic application of Cascading Style sheets (CSS, XHTML). Previous experience with Website composition is helpful but not required. Recommended reading: Lev Manovich, The Language of New Media.

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LIT 3400

Screening Literature: Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, Kurasawa

Dragan Kujundzic

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 4183

Empire and Gender

Malini Schueller

Taking imperialism as central to the construction of the United States’ national imaginary, this course will raise a number of questions about the intersection of empire and gender. How is the language of empire gendered? How does gender structure metaphors such as the frontier? How are representations of colonized spaces and racial others invested with discourses of gender? How does the captivity narrative persist in the narrative of contemporary imperialism? We will focus on specific sites of empire such as Hawai’i, Mexico, the Philippines, and Vietnam, and examine the literary and cultural texts that emerge from those sites. Most of our readings will be from the twentieth century, but there will be some nineteenth-century and eighteenth-century works as well. Possible texts include:

We will also read the work of critics such as Edward Said, Anne McClintock, and Ann Laura Stoler.

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LIT 4192

Caribbean Literature: Empire and Identity

Leah Rosenberg

“Have I given you the impression that the Antigua I grew up in revolved almost completely around England ? Well, that was so. I met the world through England , and if the world wanted to meet me it would have to do so through England .” – Jamaica Kincaid (A Small Place, 33)

Exile and Englishness have traditionally been viewed as the “ground zero” of Anglophone Caribbean literature. In the 1950s, V.S. Naipaul, George Lamming, Sam Selvon and many other writers from across the region emigrated to London where they attained international acclaim, establishing the West Indian literary tradition. (Ultimately, two members of this generation would win the Nobel prize for literature: Derek Walcott [1992] and V.S. Naipaul [2001].) Schooled in everything English, from language and literature to music and food, newly-arrived writers expected to be embraced by the mother country. Instead, they found systematic racism and war rations. This exile and discrimination became the core of much Caribbean literature, cultural theory, and literary criticism. This literary and critical tradition proved powerful in shaping not only Caribbean literary studies but also British literature and cultural studies in the twentieth century. The first half of this course traces this literary migration and creation from C.L.R. James’s arrival in England in 1932 to the emergence of black cultural studies and the contemporary success of Zadie Smith and Andrea Levy.

In the second half of the semester, we examine Caribbean literature and cultural criticism that does not so clearly fit this paradigm. How do we understand the powerful role of U.S. imperialism in the Caribbean and the large body of literature produced by Caribbean writers who emigrated to Canada and the United States ? How did this paradigm include Indo-Caribbean writers and literary subjects? To what extent and how did women writers find a place in this model? How did queer literature and film come to play such a critical and yet often marginalized role? Authors will include: C.L.R. James, Claude McKay, Una Marson, Isaac Julien, Stuart Hall, Paul Gilroy, Jamaica Kincaid, Shani Mootoo, Colin Channer, Andrea Levy, V.S. Naipaul, Sam Selvon, Nalo Hopkinson, and Marcia Douglas.

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LIT 4305

Comics and Animation

Donald Ault

This seminar will focus on a selective history and emergent theories of comic books, comic strips, and animated cartoons from the late 19th century to the present, with emphasis on earlier, “originary” works, and the 6000 + pages of texts of Carl Barks, the subversive Disney comic book artist/writer and animation story man from 1946–1966, who created Scrooge McDuck and whose work will be central to the theoretical, analytical, and historical issues of the class. ImageTexts of other artists, writers, animators, and studios to be studied will probably include Winsor McCay, George Herriman, Bill Cole, Chester Gould, Will Eisner, Frank Miller, Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, the Disney, Fleischer, Iwerks, and Warner Bros. Studios, and many others.

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LIT 4322

The Folktale

Robert Thomson

For the purposes of this course, the term folktale will be held to encompass all forms of orally transmitted prose narratives, including myths, legends, memorates and wonder-tales. No knowledge of the folktale nor of the general field of folklore studies is assumed by the instructor. The first week or so of the course will attempt to orient all students to the place of the folktale in folklore studies. The three required texts have been chosen to give a representative collection of all types of prose narrative. While covering the major aspects of the familiar European tradition, the texts will also bring to our attention the ethnic traditions of the United States, particularly the oral narratives recorded from Native Americans in Wisconsin at the turn of the nineteenth/twentieth centuries and from African Americans in Eatonville, Florida in the 1920’s and ‘30’s. In addition, we will address those issues that have for half a century kept theorists and analysts struggling with the complexities of these “simple forms.”

Texts:

All the above texts are available from Goering’s Bookstore.

In addition to the study of tales within the texts above, we will address the following topics:

There will be 3 tests given at roughly three week intervals during the course. In addition two reports, each of about 2500 words will be required.

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LIT 4333

Literature for the Adolescent

John Cech

This course is designed to provide a survey of major figures, historical trends, and critical approaches to that field of literature that occupies the shifting, transitional ground between children’s and adult literatures. This class examines a broad range of styles and genres intended for or chosen by the adolescent reader, beginning with classics from the 19th century and ending with some innovative novels from our own literary present. Taken together, these works will raise many of the questions (psychological, social, philosophical) that are asked by adolescents about their own challenging, demanding, and often defining experiences.

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LIT 4333

Literature for the Adolescent: The Diary

Anastasia Ulanowicz

The diary, we say, is a “secret” form which charts the interior development of a solitary individual. However, the diary may not be as “private” as we might originally imagine: the diarist always addresses herself to an interlocutor (if even an imagined one) and her writing is shape – as writing always is – by the multiple and often competing cultural discourses. Thus, the diary may be characterized as a liminal literary form, lying as it does at the intersection between private and public discourse. Bearing this characterization in mind, it may be argued that the diary is an especially useful form through which to study the representation of adolescence and adolescent (“YA”) literature. After all, adolescence, not unlike the diary, may be understood in terms of its liminal status: teenagers, we say, are poised precariously at the intersection between childhood and adulthood, and domestic (“interior”) life and public (“exterior”) life. Young adult literature is, as well, something of a liminal form, insofar as it is commonly (mis)perceived as a “gateway” to “real” literature.

The objective of this course, then, is to link our analysis of the diary, as a distinct and characteristically liminal literary form, to our study of adolescence and its literary representation. In the course of the semester, we will read a series of contemporary diaries – some of them non-fictional texts written by actual teenaged authors, and some of them works of fiction written by adult authors who assume the “voice” of adolescence – in order to explore the ways in which such texts draw upon and contribute to cultural notions of adolescence. As we perform such analyses, we will pay particularly close attention to the ways in which the narrative content of these texts – and the cultural notions of adolescence implicit within such content--is communicated through structure and genre.

Our list of primary texts will include adolescents’ war diaries (Zlata Filipovic’s Zlata’s Diary and Anne Frank’s Diary of a Young Girl), prison diaries (Walter Dean Myers’s Monster), and co-authored diaries (The Notebook Girls). We will pay especially close attention to the relationship between the diary, adolescence, and the abject as we read Phoebe Gloeckner’s Diary of a Teenage Girl and the anonymously published Go Ask Alice. Additionally, we will consider whether adult-authored YA diaries such as Sue Townsend’s The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole and Meg Cabot’s The Princess Diaries differ substantially from those authored by actual teenagers, such as the diaries of Anne Frank and of the authors of The Notebook Girls. In addition to these primary texts, we will read critical and theoretical pieces by Louis Althusser, Roland Barthes, Judith Butler, Cathy Caruth, Thomas Doherty, Margaret Finders, Jurgen Habermas, Scott McCloud, Cynthia Ozick, and Jacqueline Rose.

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LIT 4483

Networked History and Visual Culture

Scott Nygren

This is an experimental course in Media and Cultural Studies, an area in the process of being invented. The course will consider film and the visual arts in relation to a rethinking of history in a postmodern context. Film and Media Studies intersects here with Cultural Studies, as an approach to visual representations and their social, political and psychological contexts and effects.

History in a postmodern context is reconfigured as a frontier and laboratory, rather than as a set of materials imagined as if fixed, already known, and obsolete. History in these terms questions disciplinary boundaries, chronological sequence and familiar narratives in order to investigate the often unconscious assumptions that drive the information environment that we now inhabit. A point of departure will be Lyotard’s argument that determining figures inhabit media discourses, that shape their possibilities and limits, and that we can best approach these figural assumptions by way of visual media and the arts.

Accordingly, we will look at a series of engagements between the visual arts and cinema, linking together disparate periods and disciplines, in order to better understand the operation and effects of visual discourses that surround us today. One such engagement will be the relation of cubism to early cinema, as a theoretical response in visual terms that helps us unravel the implications and effects of moving images. Another will be the question of what classicism means in relation to “Classic Hollywood Cinema,” which we will approach by way of Maya Deren’s avant-garde films, the Japanese theorist Kojin Karatani’s work on “Architecture as Metaphor,” and the role of Neoclassicism in the European and American traditions. We will then consider a series of links across historical periods informed by theoretical readings from Lyotard and Deleuze, including the early Renaissance in relation to avant-garde film, baroque imaging and Peter Greenaway’s digital layering, Asian landscape scrolls and Japanese films, Byzantine anti-realist representation and the politics of video, and so on.

Students will be asked to similarly experiment with history and media, and will read Daniel Milo’s “Toward an Experimental History” to guide the process. The issue is not always a ‘correct’ reading, in the sense of a single, absolute, essential truth of a text, but a serious if playful engagement on methodological terms which may vary, conflict and contest with others. These engagements may take the form of a paper, a project, or one of each, for a total of two during the semester.

Books will include

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LIT 4535

Women, Work, and Popular Culture

Susan Hegeman

Arguably one of the biggest changes affecting American women over the last century has been their entry in unprecedented numbers into the public world of wage labor. Meanwhile, polls continue to show that women do a disproportionate share of domestic labor, including housekeeping and childcare. This course will examine women’s labor, both paid and unpaid, through the lens of popular culture, including films, popular literature, and fashion. In our discussions we will consider popular cultural materials not simply as evidence of dramatic historical changes involving women and work, but as attempts to make sense of these changes as well. Readings will include historical and critical studies, popular nonfiction, and novels. Texts will likely include:

We will also discuss a number of films, including:

Grading will be based upon class participation and three take-home exams.

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LIT 4930

Extraordinary Voyages: The Narrative Fiction of Jules Verne

Terry Harpold

A century after his death, Jules Verne (1828–1905) remains one of the most read European authors of the last 150 years. UNESCO’s Index Translationum lists Verne as the third most often translated author in the world, a ranking well above that of every other author writing in French, and above such standard-bearers as Shakespeare, Lenin, and the Brothers Grimm.

In the twenty-first century, Verne is widely – and inaccurately – known as an author of children’s adventure- and proto-science fiction, set in exotic locales and populated by fantastic machines, hardy explorers, and half-mad scientists. Few modern readers are aware that he wrote more than fifty novels and dozens of shorter works, that he was a successful playwright whose “musical spectacles” played for hundreds of performances on the Paris stage, or that he co-wrote four volumes of geography and maritime history.

There is simply more to Verne than most of us have been taught. His fiction especially bears little resemblance to the Disneyfied, Bowdlerized versions that have been foisted on English-speaking audiences. The novels are as narratively and textually nuanced, and as historically and culturally typical, as those of any other major European or American author of the period. They are, moreover, thematically and philosophically complex works: Verne’s attitudes towards race, gender, militarism, colonialism, and industrialism are surprising modern in certain respects, and in others plainly mired in prejudices and conventions of his time. And the books themselves were beautiful: in the format in which they are most celebrated, the magnificently-illustrated 48 volume Voyages extraordinaires published by Hetzel et Cie., they represent the pinnacle of the illustrated popular press of the late 19th century.

The recent renaissance of Verne studies in Europe and the US suggests that the exemplarity and subtlety of his work, and its important influences on major threads of modernist and postmodernist narrative fiction, are only now being understood. This course will take this possibility as a founding axiom. We will read Verne for the pleasures and challenges that his writing presents, but also as a case study of important problems of genre, narrative, and textual methods.

The texts we will read include most of the best known and several of the least-known of the novels, novellas, and plays, including:

All texts will be read in English translations: happily, new, faithful and complete renderings have supplanted the dreadful late Victorian editions that misrepresented Verne to English speakers for more than a century. Students able to read Verne in French will be encouraged to do so; our discussion of the texts will address problems of translation unique to this linguistically adventurous and innovative writer.

Written course requirements include two take-home exams.

Students in the course may elect to take part in a companion “capstone” course, ENC 4956: “Jules Verne’s Paris in the – 21st – Century,” offered through UF’s Paris Research Center. Those participating in the capstone will spend Spring Break (March 11–17, 2007) in Paris and Amiens, France.

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LIT 4930

Introduction to Queer Theory

Melinda Cardozo

On the subject of queer theory, Judith Butler recounts: “I remember sitting next to someone at a dinner party, and he said that he was working on queer theory. And I said: What’s queer theory? He looked at me like I was crazy, because he evidently thought that I was part of this thing called queer theory.” This course provides an introduction to the amalgamation of concerns, methodologies, and texts that have come to be understood in the past fifteen years or so as “queer theory.” Course readings will include field-defining texts from Michel Foucault, Gayle Rubin, Judith Butler, and Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, as well as contemporary formulations of queer theoretical concepts from Siobhan Somerville, Ann Cvetkovich, Lee Edelman and Judith Halberstam. Throughout the semester, we will also trace the provocations these works receive from theorists, including J.L. Austin, Louis Althusser, Jaques Derrida, and Frederic Jameson.

Students will be expected to write response papers to selected texts, make an individual class presentation, and write a research-length paper at the end of the semester.

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LIT 4930

Shakespeare: Rhetoric

R. Allen Shoaf

This course will examine representative works from the poems (lyric and narrative), the tragedies, the comedies, and the histories to observe and analyze the resources of language – puns and tropes, in particular – that Shakespeare exploits to invent his art.

Students will write two long essays (7–10 pages) on topics they first clear with me.

There will be no examinations.

Class attendance is mandatory and is strictly monitored: the first two (or three) absences (i.e., 150 minutes = 1 week) will be excused, but each absence thereafter, unless excused for extraordinary reasons and in writing, reduces the final mark by 10%.

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LIT 4930

Advertising and Culture

James Twitchell

Although there are courses in advertising and advertisements, this course attempts to chart the history of a culture – our popular culture – as it has been defined and conveyed by commercial speech. We will discuss the history and changing definition of advertising; the effects of commercial discourse on our sense of self, time, and place; and essentially argue that advertising has become, like religion, one of the primary institutions of our “sociosphere.” The course is not a criticism but an exploration. “Advertising and Culture” is not a course intended to teach advertising techniques and practices to professional or pre-professional students.

Texts

Requirements

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LIT 4930

Living Under a Marxist Ideology

Mel New

English departments are one of the last places on the planet still to harbor faith in Marxism as a political, economic, or literary system of explication. The mystery of this may be accounted for by political, economic, or literary illiteracy. This course will attempt to ameliorate literary illiteracy by reading a group of authors who have experienced the Marxist state first hand and lived to tell about it (some 20,000,000 souls did not!). We will be reading, tentatively, works by Kundera, Milosz, Koestler, Ginsburg, Bulgakov, Platonov, Shalmov and Solzhenitsyn. This is a course for students who like to read, and who like to think independently. Written work, as is always true in English courses, will be required.

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SPC 3605

Speechwriting

Ron Carpenter

Speechwriting is an advanced composition course. In SPC 3605, students acquire stylistic prowess by which their sentences have increased potential for memorability and quotability, ease and accuracy of comprehension, as well as overall persuasiveness. The course is called Speechwriting because models of eloquence to be imitated are in sentences of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, John Kennedy, and Martin Luther King, Jr., for examples. Although you practice these stylistic skills while writing speeches, the acquired prowess is applicable in virtually any future communication endeavors, as speakers or writers, regardless of profession.

SPC 3605 is not about supporting arguments or organizing them into broader discourse. If you seek those skills, other courses are more appropriate. Speechwriting is about how to select the best words and arrange them in their best orders – within sentences – to achieve optimal impress of your ideas upon readers or listeners. These stylistic skills are practiced and perfected in drafts that you read aloud among peers (and for me) during our “lab” periods, wherein you should acquire a refined sense of how to achieve the final product desired at the semester end. Thus, present drafts when due; listen carefully to other students’ drafts, comparing yours with theirs; participate in rewriting others’ sentences; and heed my commentary about all drafts. Do not assume that “participation” means simply presenting your drafts and listening only to commentary about them.

How a draft is presented, vocally and physically, has no bearing on your grade (for help with delivery skills other courses are appropriate; I may make suggestions about how to improve your platform presence, however). The important point is that Speechwriting is an advanced composition course, wherein you read drafts aloud as bases of discussion by which all students understand how and why some sentences are better than others. For initial and final drafts, I require word processing available in computer labs on campus (if you do not have your own computer). Revision on your disk is easier; spelling is accurate; and word lengths of drafts are known.

From past experience, I know that reasonably diligent students achieve a substantial measure of the stylistic skills taught in this course. Final grades are higher, however, as you (1) demonstrate refined prowess as the competent stylist on exams and in final drafts, (2) understand course precepts derived from readings and lecture materials, as tested by three exams during the semester (the course has no final exam), and (3) produce a final research paper about style as defined in this course (research paper options will be explained during a lecture relatively early in the semester and will require additional library reading). Final grades are determined one-half by the average of your three exam scores and one-half by the quality of your final notebook with polished drafts of speeches and the research paper – all typed, double-spaced, and turned in during exam week at the time and date listed in the University Timetable as the course final exam period. The textbook for the course is Ronald H. Carpenter, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works; it can be purchased at Goerings Book Store at Bageland.

Although this is a writing course, I also am impressed – for grading purposes – by how much you know about style as defined in this class. Please appreciate the fact that this composition course is unlike virtually all other persuasive writing courses at the University of Florida, for the expertise and confidence in the precepts being taught are derived from your instructor’s own published research in four scholarly press books, several book chapters, and numerous research journal articles (all of which informed my writing of your textbook). Furthermore, from my experience as a communications consultant for organizations outside the university (such as corporate executives, lawyers, civic leaders, hospital administrators, public relations professionals, and officers attending the U.S. Naval War College), I know that skills taught in this course are useful in the “real” world.

In conclusion, teaching you to be eloquent stylists gives me great personal satisfaction. For I can make positive changes in your behaviors as communicators. If you join me in this endeavor, which admittedly entails some substantial effort on your part, I promise you will acquire valuable skills that will be admired by others as well as be useful for the rest of your life, no matter what your later profession might be. The only prerequisite for the course is that you can write grammatical sentences that are punctuated correctly.

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SPC 4680

Rhetorical Criticism: Masterpieces of Rhetoric

Ron Carpenter

Rhetorical Criticism has as its focus several “masterpieces of rhetoric.” Although several of these are in the realm of political and presidential discourse, another focus this semester will be upon rhetorical efforts to persuade Americans to engage in armed conflict with other nations. Thus, students will examine how some speakers, writers, and filmmakers appealed successfully to specific attitudes and actions with profound influence upon the course of events. The primary goal of the course is to provide students with a refined sense of some rhetorical principles and techniques by which their own future discourse is more effective persuasively. Please note: “rhetoric” is not a pejorative word. In its current and inaccurate usage, the word often is prefaced with the adjective “empty” to disparage what “other” people say or write ostensibly as groundless emotional appeal in contradistinction to discourse that presumably only “tells it like it is.” But accurately, “rhetoric” refers to those means by which discourse “adjusts ideas to people and people to ideas.” So rhetoric is the art of persuasion, and rhetorical criticism identifies and assesses what was done with words (and other factors) to achieve persuasion.

Students will write five short papers (2–3 typed pages), four of which will summarize and expand briefly upon assigned readings, films, or group projects (the fifth paper is the enthymemic persuasion of me, an assignment that will be described in week six). I will accept these papers co-signed by all group members that participated. A longer final paper (8–10 typed pages) will report research about some topic suggested by the course (the focus of that paper must be developed in consultation with me). The course will have four very short quizzes during the semester as well as a “take home” final exam. Please understand that your group projects will require meetings with your student peers outside regular class periods. Students also are required to view some films outside of class. The textbook is Halford Ryan, Contemporary American Public Discourse: A Collection of Speeches and Critical Essays. It is available at Goerings Book Store, next to Bageland.

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