Undergraduate Courses, Fall 2011

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Upper Division (3000–4000) Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

AML 3031

Self-Made, Self-Making: Mapping the Self in Early American Autobiographical Writing

Kristin Allukian

Early Americans lived through a dynamic time of nation-making and turbulent social and political change. From the colonial era, Revolutionary period, and to the Civil War, a diverse array of writers not only sought to document their lives, they crafted distinct “selves” for their readers, selves that allow us to think about the historical and national dimensions of subjectivity and identity.  Midwives, slaves, Native Americans, rogues, conmen, religious revivalists: all sought to persuade, instruct, and even seduce readers through literary performances of American experiences.

This course will explore the lively and diverse array of “self-making” in early American autobiographical writings (autobiographies, diaries, letters, confessions, adventures, and even novels and poetry). The guiding question for our course will be how these literary performances of “selfhood” exploit, reflect, and/or reveal the economic, political, religious, and social fluidity of the early American era.  We will also be reading with an eye toward what these writings reveal or do not reveal about social vectors such as sex, war, women’s waged and unwaged work, family, and national “belonging.”

Our primary texts will range from canonical works like Franklin’s Autobiography which is said to have inaugurated the American upward-mobility narrative tradition to lesser known texts like Eliza Wilkinson’s Letters During the Invasion and Possession of Charleston, S.C., which offered the writer, as Sharon Harris tells us, a way to express both her intellectual abilities and her opinions on religious, cultural, and political events at a time when women who engaged in too imaginative endeavors risked condemnation. As many of these writers show, documenting their lives carried risks, as well as potential rewards.  Other possible texts include: Jonathan Edwards’s Personal Narrative (c.1740); The Diary of Martha Ballard (1785–1812), The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa the African (1789), Memoirs of Stephen Burroughs (1798), A Son of the Forest: The Experience of William Apess, A Native of the Forest, Comprising a Notice of the Pequod Tribe of Indians, Written by Himself (1829), Phineus T. Barnum’s Life of P.T. Barnum (1854); and Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom: The Escape of William and Ellen Craft from Slavery (1860).

This is a reading intensive class. In order to be prepared for each class, students must come to class having completed all reading assignments as well as having had time to reflect on the readings.  Requirements include quizzes, close reading exercises, two 6–8 page essays, oral presentations, and active class participation.

toptop

AML 4170

The First U.S. Novels

Ed White

This class takes up the phenomenon of early US politics and the novel form. The first novels appeared as partisan conflict took shape in the early 1790s, pitting the emerging Democratic-Republican movement against the Federalists: the former was more committed to democratic participation in government, but was also opposed to women’s participation and supported slavery, while the latter, an anti-democratic movement, opposed slavery and made some inroads on women’s rights. We will explore this confusing literary and political landscape to consider how “liberal” and “conservative” politics took shape between the late 1780s and the 1810s. We will begin with a case study of a farmer’s rebellion, the “Shay’s Uprising” or Massachusetts Regulation. We will then move through a series of interesting conservative novels and the rarer “democratic” novels, in an attempt to figure out not just political positions but political sensibilities and affects. Writers considered may include: William Hill Brown, Royall Tyler, Thomas Fessenden, Martha Meredith Read, and Sally Wood.

This is a reading intensive course.

toptop

AML 4170

Realism, Naturalism, Local Color

Susan Hegeman

This course will survey some of the narrative fiction – novels and short stories – of the United States in the period 1880 to 1915. The literature of this moment is categorized using a number of different labels, especially “realism,” “naturalism,” and “local color,” but it is also indebted to other artistic movements of the time, including aestheticism, decadence, and modernism. We will discuss the process by which literary historians categorize works of literature as we examine the overlapping themes, forms, settings, and contexts that went into the creation of both novels and short stories. In particular, we will be interested in how authors of this exciting period of American history grappled with the experience of being “modern.”

We will read works by Abraham Cahan, Willa Cather, Charles Chesnutt, Stephen Crane, Harold Frederic, Hamlin Garland, Henry James, James Weldon Johnson, and Jack London, among others. Grades will be based on two 7–10 page papers, workshops, class participation, and quizzes.

toptop

AML 4225

Studies in Nineteenth Cantury American Literature and Culture

Wylie Lenz

In this class, we will concern ourselves with the interrelated issues of identity and citizenship as addressed by nineteenth-century American literature, focusing on narrative fiction and nonfiction produced during the decades prior to the Civil War. Specifically, we will interrogate textual constructions of subjectivity as informed by race, gender, and class, while attempting to generate answers to the following questions: In an era in which the full benefits of citizenship were enjoyed exclusively by white (and, before the rise of Jacksonian democracy, propertied) males, how were the experiences of the disenfranchised represented? What role do these representations play in the nineteenth-century project of locating and establishing a particularly American character and culture? In what way are these representations influenced by and reflective of the accelerating political, economic, social, technological, and geographical changes taking place at this time? How might they contribute to a discussion of the debates and tensions that culminated in the Civil War? Possible texts for this reading-intensive course include works by Lydia Maria Francis Child, William Apess, Margaret Fuller, William Wells Brown, Herman Melville, Harriet E. Wilson, and Rebecca Harding Davis, among others.

toptop

AML 4311

Major Authors: Willa Cather & the Novel

Stephanie A. Smith

In her lifetime, Willa Cather was the well-known editor of McClure’s Magazine, a poet, short-story writer and a novelist, but she is best-known today as a novelist. Indeed, Cather developed a theory of how and what a novel should do across her long career. This major author’s course will revisit Cather’s career as a novelist, examining both how any given individual novel “works” and what kind of narrative work it does, and also examine how Cather developed as a novelist over time. We will also situate Cather historically, as a writer of the early 20th century whose career was necessarily shaped by gender, race, class, geography, literary movements and forebears and, of course, history. We shall read her major novels, beginning with Alexander’s Bridge (1912) and ending with Lucy Gayheart (1935).

Useful websites:

toptop

AML 4453

Visions of the Land: 19th-Century American Literature and the Environment

Renee Dowbnia

Focusing on ecocritical approaches to literary analysis, this course will examine various authors’ portrayals of and reflections on nature in 19th-century America. We will pay particular attention to how these writers respond to physical changes to their environment during the era, including westward expansion, the destruction of the Civil War and changing landscape of Reconstruction, and the effects of industrialization by the end of the century. Moreover, we will also consider the philosophical changes to their conceptions of nature, including the impact of Darwin’s The Origin of Species in 1859 and the influence of the Transcendentalist movement. Whether challenging or condoning scientific views of nature, calling for preservation of an already disappearing American landscape and its endangered species, or debating the use of nature as an economic resource, American writers’ reflections on nature are not relegated solely to environmental treatises and nature writing of the era. Such responses can be seen in its various literary forms, including fiction, poetry, essays, travel writing, and journals. Their work played a crucial role in defining a distinctly “American” canon of literature, as called for by Emerson and others, as well as influencing the environmental writing that would follow in the 20th century.

Topics covered will include the tropes of American pastoral and wilderness; regionalism and the importance of place; intersections of nature, gender, class, and race; human/animal relationships, depictions of Native Americans and nature.
Possible texts in this reading-intensive course include works by Susan Fenimore Cooper, Nathaniel Hawthorne,Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, George Perkins Marsh, Walt Whitman, Louisa May Alcott, and Sarah Orne Jewett, among others.

toptop

AML 4453

The University

Kim Emery

From Thomas Jefferson to Tom Perotta, American writers have explored the meaning of higher education in and to US culture. Their understandings of the University are inevitably caught up with ideas and ideals central to the American experience: the dream of upward mobility, the democratic faith in public deliberation, the myth of meritocracy. Like the country itself, the American University is cross-cut by class, race, and gender. It represents different things to different segments of the population and serves different functions in different circumstances. The University has been a space of conflict and contestation, of conversation and community, of cooperation and of competition. It has been a force for assimilation, a haven for dissent, an agent of repression, and a scene of protest. It has offered the country both vision and violence.

Drawing on works from diverse genres, this course will consider various ways in which higher education in general and the research university in particular have been conceived and experienced in the United States. We will read fiction, theory, histories, sociological studies, and advocacy literature, and we will also watch some films. Finally, we will talk with scholars, activists, administrators, and others involved in shaping this University’s present uses and possible futures.

Written responses to assigned readings, occasional short quizzes, a class presentation, and a final paper or project are required.

toptop

CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

Padgett Powell

Course description not available at this time.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 14, 2011 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

toptop

CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

Mary Robison

Course description not available at this time.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 14, 2011 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

toptop

CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry

William Logan

“Poorly depicted clouds – which most people would not notice as wrong – are so disturbing to Dr. Thornes that they almost spoil visits to museums. For a meteorologist, the distraction is as great as the ordinary viewer being confronted by a figure with three arms. . . . [He added that] too many artists had painted [clouds] as they would a backcloth in a theatre.”

The Guardian (London), 9 August 2000

In this workshop we will attend to words as closely as a painter attends to paint – or to clouds. You will read a broad selection of modern poetry, from Emily Dickinson to Gjertrud Schnackenberg, and write a poem a week. Every week the workshop will consider for discussion poems from the past and poems from students. This is an advanced workshop in poetry, for students who have already taken at leats one lower-division workshop (CRW 1301 or CRW 2300) and want to press their understandings of poetic language even further. 

Email or hard-copy submission of your manuscript is necessary for early registration. I’m out of the country and cannot read hard copy. Please submit four poems to me at <wlogan@english.ufl.edu> in one attachment in .rtf format. Mention the workshops you have previously taken.

Reading list:

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 14, 2011 deadline.

topManuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

toptop

CRW 4905

Advanced Seminar in Fiction Writing

Mary Robison

Course description not available at this time.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 14, 2011 deadline.

linkManuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

toptop

CRW 4906

Advanced Seminar in Poetry Writing

Michael Hofmann

The familiar and much-loved combination of close reading and directed (or directionless) writing. The set book this semester will probably be the anthology Staying Alive.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 14, 2011 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

toptop

ENC 3250

Professional Writing

Sid Dobrin

A professional writing course relevant in business, industry, government and other institutional settings. This course covers major elements of organizational communication with emphasis on composition of letters and memos, reports, proposals and manuals. This course will also introduce the role of transnational communication, advances in presentation software, visual communication, and search engine optimization.

toptop

ENC 3312

Advanced Argumentative Writing

Sid Dobrin

This course focuses on making arguments; in particular, it addresses writing arguments. We will examine rhetorical argumentative structures and theories, ranging from classical to contemporary rhetoric. We will consider how we read arguments, but in service of better developing strategies for writing our own arguments. We will spend a substantial amount of the semester specifically considering the role of new media technologies and visual culture in making written arguments. We will also write a lot and talk about our writing a lot.

toptop

ENC 3414

Hypermedia

Greg Ulmer

What happens to humanities education in a culture of images? The proposition to be tested in a semester-long project is that hypermedia (Internet) authoring explicitly supports creative thinking: there is a fortunate alignment in hypermedia relating the logic of creativity, the forms of popular culture, and the links-and-nodes features of networked technology. The non-traditional methodology of this course requires active engagement through practices such as inventive problem-solving and group collaboration in in-class presentations and an email listserv. The point of departure for the semester project is the observation made by cultural historians that a pattern of a few core images is found organizing the work of the most productive people across a wide range of disciplines. The historians note that the ingredients of the core image are in place by the time the individual leaves high school. Our project is to test the educational capacities of image thinking by exploring this pattern or “image of wide scope” in an experimental hypermedia self-portrait. The pedagogy for the course involves a hybrid of criticism, composition, and studio arts. The medium for the semester project is a blog (such as Wordpress), supplemented by basic photoshop and drawing programs. Extensive use will be made of online materials.

< http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/glue/hypermedia/description.shtml>

toptop

ENG 3010

Theory and Practice in Modern Criticism

Donald Ault

This course is intended as a survey of some of the foundational critical theories and methods of the twentieth century (ca. 1945-1980). There will be a good deal of reading, and in order to make sure you are keeping up with the reading, there will possibly be a few in-class quizzes, always announced in advance. You must take and pass a majority of the quizzes administered in order to pass the course. Your final grade will be based primarily on three or four writing assignments and a take-home comprehensive final exam. With permission from me you may submit a final paper to substitute for the final exam. Your final grade will reflect my assessment of your comprehension and articulation of the various theories and methods we will be studying, with an emphasis on your original insights into these critical texts, your analytical creativity, and your mastery of argumentative and stylistic power. Required text: course pack available from Xerographic Copy Center (927 NW 13th Street).

toptop

ENG 3115

Introduction to Film Theory & Criticism

Allison Rittmayer

This course will introduce current theoretical contexts for engaging the contemporary media environment, and will consider the writing of theoretical texts and the making of new films as parallel activities. 

We will study world media through close visual analysis of individual films, stressing the historical and international diversity of cinematic approaches and styles. At the same time, we will study contemporary critical writing on film and its basis in the larger domain of cultural theory. Emphasis will be on such basic issues as viewer identification, ideology, and cultural context as articulated through discourses on national cinemas, gender, sexuality, phenomenology, trauma studies, and postcolonial and ethical methodologies. Our principle purpose will be to investigate the conjuncture of theoretical issues with an experience of specific film texts, and the function of these texts in the past and present workings of history, especially as this leads towards questions for future production and study. The working assumption here is that alphabetic writing and film production both constitute modes of inscription, and represent two ways of embodying the same cultural process.

Mastery of so many topics is neither possible nor expected. The goal is to understand the conditions and motives that led to the rethinking of media, and to initiate theoretical strategies in your own work. Major assignments include one 6–8 page paper, one 10–12 page paper, and a presentation on your final essay. Active participation in class discussion is required.

toptop

ENG 3121

History of Film I

Barbara Mennel

The course provides an overview of the history of film from its origin to the coming of sound. The course is designed as the first part of a sequence on the history of film. The objective is to gain an overview of the historical development of early cinema, based on an understanding of key concepts in film studies, and to gain insight into early film theory. In addition to contemporary scholars, we will also read works by early film theorists to understand the impact of film and the emergence of film studies. We will discuss American, French, Russian, German, and British film classics. Topics will include the emergence of genres (western, horror, melodrama, comedy); questions of modernity related to urbanity, movement, and traffic; and the aesthetics of film language. The course relies on regular required weekly film screenings, readings, and the discussion of research methods and assignments as building blocks for a final paper.

toptop

ENG 3122

History of Film II

Robert Ray

This course asks you to use the movies Casablanca and Breathless as memory theaters for storing and recalling (1) the events of the 1930s, especially the consolidation of the Hollywood studio system and the rise of German fascism; and (2) the course of post-War cinematic history, especially American film noir, Italian neorealism, and the French New Wave.

The course covers film history from 1930–1965. After beginning with two movies of German origin, Fritz Lang’s M and MGM’s Grand Hotel, the course’s first half will trace the parallel developments in Hollywood and Europe, using the biography and writing of Walter Benjamin as an allegory of popular culture’s appeal and Nazism’s danger. Part I ends with the Fall of Paris, both the historical event (which drove Benjamin further into a fatal exile) and its Hollywood representation (in Casablanca). Part II traces the two roads that diverge from that moment: the film noir of movies like The Big Sleep and the neorealist rejection of Hollywood Cinema. These two filmmaking practices, apparently so contradictory, converge in the French New Wave, whose most famous movie, Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless, explicitly invokes the image of Humphrey Bogart, the star of Casablanca.

Some students, especially non-majors, have complained about the course’s significant reading requirements. That reading provides the larger historical context for the cinema’s development. But if you don’t like to do reading and have daily quizzes on it, you might think about taking a different class.

Readings:

Assignments and Grading:

I. 60% of the final grade will result from two written projects:

II. 40% of the final grade will result from the following:

You are allowed one unexcused absence. Each additional absence will deduct four points from your final course grade.

toptop

ENG 4015

Psychoanalytic Theory

Peter L. Rudnytsky

This course will provide students with an introduction to major currents in psychoanalytic theory primarily through readings of Freud, Klein, Winnicott, Lacan, Bowlby, Kohut, and Fanon.  The writings by analysts will be interspersed with the study of literary texts including Oedipus the King, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Othello, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Winter of Artifice (Nin), and Zeno’s Conscience (Svevo).  The writing requirements are a midterm, final, and one five-page term paper, as well as nongraded weekly journal entries.  Regular attendance and active participation in class discussions are also expected.

toptop

ENG 4110

Film Noir

Maureen Turim

Gangsters, detectives, the city at night, the dangerous, alluring women known as “femme fatales,” the double cross, the key lighting and striated shadows of great black and white cinematography, this famous US genre of films will be our object of study in this class. A genre that is associated with the immediate post World War II, film noir is linked to the hardboiled detective fiction of Dashiell Hammit, James M. Cain, Cornell Woolrich, and Raymond Chandler. We will explore the male narrator and the particular voice that characterizes the genre. We will consider how flashbacks explore the past. Film Noir has been studied by critics and theorists using a variety of approaches, and our readings will take into account existentialism, feminism, historical, political context, and psychoanalysis. Readings in this course will be challenging. We will consider expansion of the genre in Europe and Japan, as well as neo-noir films made more recently and in color.

On time attendance and participation in class discussion and Sakai web assignments are essential. Students must attend all in-class screenings. Since discussions will critically evaluate readings and films, assigned texts must be read prior to scheduled meetings. There will be two papers, 7–8 pages each; prospectuses and outlines of each will be turned in for approval before the final drafts of the papers.

top

ENG 4110

Contemporary Cinema

Maureen Turim

Concentrating on the post-new wave and new Hollywood cinema, this course will examine the international history of film from 1970 to the present. The goal is to awaken an understanding of the historical use of film form by exploring changes that have taken place in film industries and technologies. Each week we will view a film, examine its form of expression (looking closely at editing, set design, acting styles, dialogue, and narration). We will examine digital technologies, special effects, and 3D. We will also look at aesthetics that shun spectacular filmic action in favor of a more minimal approach. This will lead to our discussion of the film’s place in film history, as well as social history. We will look at issues of industry and audience, considering representations of gender, race and political change. Students will learn how to see films with a greater depth of visual understanding. Films to be screened include genres of Hollywood filmmaking, Independents, European, and Japanese films. We will look at directors whose talent shaped the development of cinema; we will also examine the role of actors and actresses, screenwriters, designers and producers in shaping the history of film.

Goals: A greater understanding of film history, form, and analysis, and increased knowledge of the US and International film industries. Greater knowledge of social context and contemporary history will also be a goal.

On time attendance and participation in class discussion and Sakai web assignments are essential. Students must attend all in-class screenings. Since discussions will critically evaluate readings and films, assigned texts must be read prior to scheduled meetings. There will be two papers, 7–8 pages each; prospectuses and outlines of each will be turned in for approval before the final drafts of the papers.

top

ENG 4133

Hamlet, Faust, & the Political

Richard Burt

In conjunction with a series of canonical film and television adaptations of Hamlet , Marolowe’s Doctor Faustus, and Goethe’s Faust and related spin-offs (such as Strange Brew, To Be or Not to Be, Ghost Rider, and Hamlet 2), we will pursue broad theoretical and philological questions about film adaptations of literary texts. To begin to grasp how the texts of Hamlet, Faustus, and Faust are rendered readable or unreadable when edited (conflated) or “unedited” (not conflated) and then revised for film adaptation, we will turn both to new media theory, especially contemporary theories of textual criticism and editing (creating a critical apparatus-with footnotes, index, and so on – to help the reader understand the text), translation, and the history of the book. Instead of rendering the text readable by restitching and bandaging it, we will examine the text itself as an “unread-able,” spectral effect of its translation into various media, including manuscript (non-existent for Shakespeare), prompt book, printed text, and theatrical performance. In the second half of the course, we will consider how the philological question of reading / editing the text of Hamlet bear on the crisis of liberal democracy and the rise of European fascism in the 1930s, WWII, the Holocaust, the fall of Communist Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union in 1989, and political theology. Readings will include selections from Jacques Derrida’s Spectres of Marx, Friedrich Kittler’s Discourse Networks, Avital Ronell's The Telephone Book, Carl Schmitt’s Hamlet of Hecuba and Political Theology, and Walter Benjamin’s The Origins of German Tragedy, and essays on translation by Walter Benjamin and Paul de Man. Film and television adaptations of Hamlet will include those directed by Sven Gade, Olivier, Kosintev, BBC Hamlet (strarring Derek Jacobi), Zeffirelli, Baranagh, Gielgud (starring Richard Burton) and the recently released Hamlet starring David Tennant, among others.

toptop

ENG 4133

From Berlin to Hollywood: Film Emigration, 1920s–1950s

Barbara Mennel

This course introduces students to the influence of German filmmakers on films made in the Hollywood studio system from the 1920s to the 1950s. We will study the films and the biographies of filmmakers who emigrated to Hollywood during the 1920s and the Nazi period. The class emphasizes the continuities and breaks between two different film periods and two sites of film production. Topics include expressionism, anti-Nazi films, film noir, the aesthetics of exile and migration, and B-horror film. Filmmakers include Fritz Lang, Ernst Lubitsch, Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau, Otto Preminger, Douglas Sirk, Josef von Sternberg, and Billy Wilder. There will be an emphasis on reading of theoretical material, film analysis, and how to conduct research for the final paper.

toptop

ENG 4134

Women & Fashion

Sylvie Blum

Course description not available at this time.

toptop

ENG 4135

Movements in Post-World War II Polish Cinema

Christopher Caes

This course is crosslisted with EUS 3100/sec. 1483

This course will introduce and explore three separate movements or schools of filmmaking in Polish post-World War II cinema – the “Polish School” of 1955–1965, the “Cinema of Moral Concern” of 1976–1981, and the “New Naïveté,” of 1999–present. Each of these currents adopted a loosely conceived, historically specific aesthetic and ideological platform, which it then sought to put into practice artistically in order to have a therapeutic and a didactic effect on the culture and society of its time. The “Polish School,” which was characterized by a blend of Italian neorealist and Polish Romantic or absurdist/existentialist styles, sought to represent and work through the national trauma of World War II in a context in which political censorship prevented the direct address of such issues. It includes the early work of world-renowned director Andrzej Wajda, as well as works by prominent filmmakers such as Andrzej Munk, Jerzy Kawalerowicz, and Wojciech Has. The “Cinema of Moral Concern,” which drew on and combined the techniques of West European “cinemas of truth” with those of the New Hollywood, was in the forefront of the cultural ferment of the late 70s, which was devoted to the establishment of an underground civil society outside the institutions of the communist state and led up to founding of the trade union Solidarity. It includes early work by internationally recognized filmmakers Krzysztof Kieślowski, Krzysztof Zanussi, and Agnieszka Holland. Finally, the “New Naïveté,” which draws on a broad variety of Hollywood and international styles, seeks to transform the legacy of Solidarity’s anti-communist “revolution of the spirit” into contemporary forms of cultural capital in order to lay the foundations for “capitalism with a human face.” Among filmmakers active in this movement are Krzysztof Krauze, Robert Gliński, and Piotr Trzaskalski. Screening approximately one film a week, we will view at least five works from each movement, examining and discussing their individual formal and aesthetic principles and ideological investments, their relation to their respective movement as a whole, and their impact on the culture of their day.

Course requirements: attendance and participation (includes quizzes on assigned films and readings), 18.75%; take-home midterm, 18.75%; in-class final exam, 18.75%; short paper, sequence analysis 18.75%; final paper, based on application of course concepts to a film belonging to one of the three film movements in question, yet not screened in class, 25%.

Required Texts (selection):

Films (selection):

toptop

ENG 4135

Modern Czech Cinema

Holly Raynard

Course description not available at this time.

toptop

ENG 4844

Queer Theory

Kim Emery

This course attends to the historical emergence and contemporary forms of queer theory as an intellectual practice and academic discipline. We will examine queer theory’s roots in psychoanalysis, sexology, feminism, anthropology, literary theory, and queer political activism in particular, but other subjects will also be addressed. Likely readings include key texts by Michel Foucault, Sigmund Freud, Gayle Rubin, Esther Newton, Judith Butler, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Sarah Ahmed, Lee Edelman, Kathryn Bond Stockton, and Michael Snediker. Students will develop individual research and writing projects and may also be asked to make class presentations. Regular and active participation are vital.

toptop

ENG 4905

Independent Study

Faculty Member of Choice

An Independent Study course may be taken for 1 to 3 credit hours, but will only count toward the fulfillment of the 10-course requirement for the English major if a student registers for 3 credit hours.

This course is for advanced students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The student must find a faculty member who is willing to supervise the semester-long study, and together, the two create a project. The student must meet with the professor at designated times, agreed upon in advance, and complete all assignments in a timely manner.

toptop

ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: The Children’s Classic

Kenneth Kidd

Classic is an overdetermined and elastic term. It tends toward seemingly contradictory things: timelessness and finitude, exceptionality and the commonplace, the remote and the familiar, the organic and the manufactured. Moreover, classic tends toward children’s literature as much as away from it. The notion of a children’s classic amplifies the contradictions of classic more broadly, especially to the degree that children’s literature has been devalued. The idea of the children’s classic has helped legitimize children’s literature and has thus proven useful; at the same time, classic continues to signify a traditional faith in aesthetics, and as such engenders skepticism alongside faith. No matter: J. M. Coetzee writes that “the interrogation of the classic, no matter how hostile, is part of the history of the classic, inevitable and even to be welcomed.”

This course attends to the making (perhaps forging) of the children’s classic, literary but also cinematic. We will begin with classic definitions of the classic: Sainte-Beueve, Matthew Arnold, T. S. Eliot, Frank Kermode. We will then take up the question of the classic in relation to popular and academic culture, drawing on a wide range of theoretical and cultural readings on such subjects as book and publishing history, canonicity, bestsellerdom, middlebrow culture, the public sphere, literary prizing, and anticensorship work. Our central theoretical guides will be Pierre Bourdieu and James English. Students will write regular short response papers as well as several longer essays. Active and engaged participation is vital to the success of the course.

toptop

ENG 4936

Honors Seminar:

Staff

Course description not available at this time.

toptop

ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Novels of the Harlem Renaissance

Mark Reid

This course focuses on novels that were written during the Harlem Renaissance and contrast them with other contemporary writing during of the period. Class discussions will consider how black writers, in redefining the black character in literature, influence how non-black writers construct the racial Other in their works.

toptop

ENG 4940

Internship

Undergraduate Coordinator

The English Department at the University of Florida offers three* credit hours of internship to its majors who provide the following to the Undergraduate Coordinator for approval:

Once the Undergraduate Coordinator has approved the internship requested by the student, the department will register the student for the internship credits.

Upon completion of the internship:

*For two credit hours, the student would need to work 8 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 16 hours per week for Summer A or B.

*For one credit hour, the student would need to work 4 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 8 hours per week for Summer A or B.

Please note the following limitations on the English Internship:

toptop

ENG 4953

Department Seminar: Posthumography

Richard Burt

This course will analyze a wide range of issues related to publication in general by focusing on posthumous publication in particular. Often extremely heated controversies over posthumously published or never published writings throw into relief uncritically held assumptions about authorship and the book that constitute the default (partly for legal and economic reasons) of book publication tout court. We will begin with Stephen Booth’s 1977 edition of Shakespeare's Sonnets (with a preface that constructs a hybrid reader located in 1607 and 1977 and facing page 1607 and 1977 [modernized] editions of each Sonnet); Percy Bysshe Shelley’s posthumously published “The Triumph of Life”; Thomas Bernhard’s Correction (a deeply ironic novel about a character who edits the manuscript of a dead friend to prepare it for publication); Vladimir Nabokov’s The Original of Laura, a novel by Nabokov wrote on index cards, all of which are reproduced in the novel and edited by his son Dimitri; Soren Kierkegaard’s pseudonymously written, Either / Or, supposedly a manuscript (within a manuscript) found in a hidden desk drawer; and Jacques Derrida, “The Pharmakon,” in Dissemination.

toptop

ENG 4953

Department Seminar: Supersized: Modern Long Poems and Historical Epic Film

Marsha Bryant

Poetic and cinematic epics share more than we might think. Ambitious, stylized, and meticulously researched, these supersized genres draw heavily on the ancient Mediterranean cultures enshrined in Classical, Biblical, and Egyptian traditions. Both employ a spectacular breadth of space, time, and characters. While epic quest and battle provide much of the form’s surge and splendor, romance plots shape its softer side. In this class we will explore these “supersized” texts to consider these questions: Is there a poetics of epic film, and a cinematic dimension to the modern long poem? Why did the 1920s prove so conducive to both genre’s emergence? What factors shaped epic film’s postwar resurgence and revision? How might we understand American culture’s recent returns to historical epic film? Careful preparation and active participation are required. Assignments include quizzes, two papers, and a creative project. Poems will include T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, Muriel Rukeyser’s The Book of the Dead, William Carlos Williams’ Paterson, H.D.’s Helen in Egypt, and Derek Walcott’s Omeros. Films will include D. W. Griffith’s Intolerance, Cecil B. DeMille’s Cleopatra and The Ten Commandments, and Robert Wise’s Helen of Troy.

toptop

ENG 4970

Honors Thesis Project

Faculty members (2) of Choice

Students must have have completed at least one semester of ENG 4936, Honors Seminar. Open to English Honors students.

The student must select two faculty members: one to direct the reading, research, and writing of a thesis on a topic of the student’s and director’s chosing, and another as the second reader. An abstract (100 to 200 words) and one copy of the thesis (30 to 50 pages) must be delivered to the CLAS Academic Advising Center on Fletcher Road at least 10 days before graduation.

toptop

ENL 3132

Twentieth-Century British Novel

Camelia Raghinaru

This course looks at the way modernism and its tenets – alienation, uncertainty, instability, mechanization, and fragmentation – shape the twentieth-century British novel. With Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and D.H. Lawrence we also examine their increasing preoccupation with gender and the phenomenology of consciousness. With Ford Madox Ford and a reluctant modernist like E.M. Forster we read romance as subversion of realism and criticism of oppressive conventions of class. The second half of the century is marked by the literary response to modernism, which results either in an anti-modernist realism or postmodernist experimentation. Actually, we will show why postmodernism does not situate us in a context distinct from modernity. Rather, it continues a troubled relation to it. While writers like Iris Murdoch counter with an anti-modernist, anti-avant-garde “neo-realism,” others like A S. Byatt, Graham Swift, John Fowles, and Ian McEwan reject the anti-modernist backlash and group themselves under the banner of the postmodern. They both internalize and revise some of the tenets of modernism. Finally, we look at a contemporary writer like Zadie Smith, whose appropriation of Forster raises the issues of retrieval, canonicity, intertextuality, postcolonialism, and subalternity.

Texts include:

Assignments:

Two essays (8–10 pages for the first, 10–12 pages for the second), an annotated bibliography, a presentation, and reading quizzes.

toptop

ENL 3154

Modern British Poetry

Marsha Bryant

This course provides in-depth analysis of W.B. Yeats, Wilfred Owen, T. S. Eliot, W.H. Auden, Stevie Smith, Philip Larkin, Ted Hughes, Grace Nichols, Michael Hofmann, and recently named Laureate Carol Ann Duffy. We will examine their poems, lives, and cultural contexts. As we move through the semester, gender, family, and nation become increasingly dislocated as traditional concepts of “poetry” and “British” continue to shift. Course assignments are two papers, a panel presentation, a parody, reading quizzes, and engaged participation in discussion.

toptop

ENL 3251

Victorian Literature: Crime, Sensation, & Detection

Brittany Roberts

Although stories of crime and deviance have circulated in Western culture since its inception, it is during the nineteenth century that crime fiction emerged as a recognizable genre with tremendous popular appeal. From seedy urban underworlds to respectable middle-class drawing rooms, this course will explore the multifaceted crime narratives that thrived in the Victorian period and investigate their cultural currency in a time preoccupied with bringing disrupting forces to order for the good of the home, nation, and empire. We will survey the criminal confessions of the Newgate Calenders, the lurid middle-class scandals of sensation fiction, as well as the rise of the detective figure and the development of detective fiction as a coherent genre. The majority of our reading will be centered on novels and short fiction; however, you should be ready to engage meaningfully with secondary materials as well. Authors likely to be covered include: Charles Dickens, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Wilkie Collins, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and many others.

toptop

ENL 4311

Chaucer

R. Allen Shoaf

Course description not available at this time.

toptop

ENL 4333

Shakespeare III

Peter Rudnytsky

This course is the third in a sequence that proceeds chronologically through Shakespeare’s complete works.  This semester we will cover the five-year period from 1599 to 1604, which includes As You Like It, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, Troilus and Cressida, Measure for Measure, Othello, and All’s Well That Ends Well. We will also take up the Sonnets and “The Phoenix and Turtle.” No previous background is required, but we will explore the plays in depth, taking our time and reading as closely as possible. We will be approaching Shakespeare from a psychoanalytic perspective, with emphasis on gender issues, but we will use Shakespeare to understand psychoanalysis, not vice versa. The written requirements are a midterm, final, and one five-page paper. Regular attendance and active participation in class discussions are also expected.   

toptop

ENL 4333

Shakespeare

Robert Thomson

Course description not available at this time.

toptop

LIT 3031

Narrative Poetry from Milton to Browning

J. Stephen Addcox

This class will study narrative poetry in the two hundred years between John Milton’s publication of Paradise Lost in 1667 and Robert
Browning’s publication of The Ring and the Book in 1868. While literary studies of this period have generally focused on the “rise of
the novel,” this class will consider the narrative verse that was produced during this period of the novel’s growing ascendancy. Of
interest to the work of this class will be the ways in which poetry is particularly suited to telling stories. What do poetically rendered
narratives have to offer that is singular and distinctive? What makes any particular story better suited for poetry than some other form? To aid us in posing answers to these questions, we will also study traditional poetic meter and rhyme, especially as they inform and
influence the narrative. In addition to Milton and Browning, other authors may include Alexander Pope, Lord Byron, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

Students will be evaluated on two papers (one explication and one research essay), reading quizzes, and class participation.

toptop

LIT 3043

Modern Drama: Learning by Doing

Sid Homan

The assumption in all my theatre courses is that the text of a play is not just what is written on the page but that text in performance, delivered by actors before an audience. This means the play’s text also includes gestures, movement, blocking (the stage picture), and sub-text (what the character is saying inwardly, beneath the lines delivered onstage, as well as the “history” for that character invented by the actor). In the theatre, we would further supplement this text with lighting, sound, set, costumes, props, and make-up. To be sure, one can approach a play in a thousand ways – as literature, as a repository for the thinking of an age, as the springboard for political or cultural issues. But, since I work both on campus and in the theatre as an actor and director, and since the theatre itself is a unique medium with its own aesthetic principles, I approach the plays, with my students, and as a fellow “student,” as something meant to be performed by an actor and ratified by an audience. In the class each student will have a scene partner with whom he or she stages several scenes each semester. Once performed, the class and I, as co-directors, “work” that scene with the two actors, trying out options, rehearsing it. The emphasis, therefore, is on learning by doing, and I judge student work by intent, what goes into the performance – not by finesse. If there is finesse, that is considered a bonus. Each actor also writes a short paper assessing his or her experience during rehearsal for a scene. Performances and the scene papers count equally.

In this course, we will thus consider Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, Embers, All That Fall, Play, Eh Joe, Not I, and Come and Go; Harold Pinter’s The Lover, Old Times, Betrayal, and No Man’s Land, Sam Shepard’s True West, Curse of the Starving Class, and Buried Child; and Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.

A word of comfort: whether you have acted before or not, experience in the theatre is not a factor in the class.  We use acting as a way of studying the text.  Have no fears on this issue!

If you have any questions or comments, please e-mail Professor Homan at< shakes@ufl.edu>.

toptop

LIT 3173

Motherhood in Modern Hebrew Fiction

Avraham Balaban

This course is crosslisted with HBR 4930 (8463), JST 3930 (4637) and WST 3930 (5331).

The course examines the different representations of motherhood in Hebrew fiction throughout the twentieth century against the background of contemporary theories about motherhood. The course starts with motherhood as it is depicted in the writing of the founders of modern Hebrew fiction (S-Y. Agnon, Dvorah Baron), reviews mothers portrayed by the 1948 generation, then concentrates on the “New Wave” writers of the 1960s, and the new generation of women writers in the 1990s. In the fiction of the 1960s we find three different models of motherhood: a) the overly dedicated, self-effacing mother, who does not leave breathing space to her children; b) the mentally sick mother, who abandons her children (mainly in the fiction of Amos Oz); c) the alienated mother, who is busy pursuing her spiritual journeys (Amalia Kahana-Carmon).

In the last two decades, a new generation of women writers has added several dimensions to these models. With the typical shift of point of view from a child-narrator to a mother–narrator, the concept of the mother as a nurturing, self–sacrificing, almost selfless creature, who lives to serve her children, has almost disappeared. Instead, motherhood is described as a conflict-ridden situation. The tensions associated with motherhood have varied sources: a) the inherent difficulties of motherhood, of giving birth and raising a family (The Ravens by Avirama Golan), b) personal wishes and needs, i.e. the wish to start a new relation and a new family (Tsruya Shalev and Mira Magen), c) the national demands (sending a child to the army; Dolly City by Orly Castel-Blum); d) living with an abusive husband (Sdomel by Lea Eini).

toptop

LIT 3383

Turn of the 20th Century Women Writers

Stephanie A. Smith

In America at the end of the nineteenth century, well-documented changes in daily life opened new horizons in both style and substance for women. The labor force swelled with new immigrants; the Great Migration of African-Americans from rural to urban areas began around 1912; and while many American women had been working for decades, house-bound middle-class women also began to go to work. New modes of production, improved technologies like the steam-powered sewing machines of the 1870s, marketing, advertising and distribution made for increased consumption.

Thus the twentieth century offered change to many American women, from what they did to what they wore, and, of course, who they were. A new word entered the American vocabulary at this time, originating in Bohemian Greenwich Village: “feminist.” Although they would not have the vote until 1921, suffragettes regained some of the political steam lost by the earlier Women’s Movement. People of this era, but especially young women, were restless. Many works written by women at this time reflect upon feelings about themselves that ranged from dissatisfaction to hopelessness. For example, in 1913, both Thea Kronberg of Willa Cather’s The Song of the Lark and Undine Spragg of Edith Wharton’s The Custom of the Country, are described as physically restless, as if a compulsion to move had been inscribed in their flesh.

Women authors began to explore hitherto taboo choices or silenced miseries and this period marked a flowering of women’s voices that had been, in the past, left out by most critical paradigms of American literature, such as realism and naturalism. This course will explore that flowering of the American woman’s narrative from 1898 to 1929; authors will include Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, and Nella Larson, among others, along with critical arguments about the works we shall read.

toptop

LIT 4183

Nationlism and the Novel

Apollo Amoko

This course explores the relationship imagined between contemporary nationalist discourses and the narrative form of the realist novel. In Imagined Communities, a landmark study on the origins and spread of nationalism, Benedict Anderson appears to suggest that the novel (along with the newspaper) was central to the possibility of imagining the modern nation. The aesthetic of the novel made it possible to think and narrate the nation in “homogeneous empty time.” Further, Anderson seems to contend that the canonization of literary texts through the school system was instrumental for enabling the intelligentsia to “take the nation to the people.” From this perspective, it is not surprising that literature has historically conceived of its objects of study in fundamentally nationalist terms. In Cultural Capital, a landmark study on the logic of literary canon formation, John Guillory contends that the effect of nationalist legitimization cannot be understood as a property inherent in the aesthetic of the novel (or the newspaper), but rather, is the product of a certain context of reading, “a pedagogical imaginary.” Specific literary works, Guillory insists, must be seen as “the vector of ideological notions which do not inhere in the works themselves but in the context of their institutional presentation, or more simply, in the way in which they are taught.” He makes a firm distinction between pedagogical and national imaginaries, between school and national cultures. In his argument, school culture “does not unify the nation culturally so much as it projects out of a curriculum of artifact-based knowledge an imaginary cultural unity never actually coincident with the culture of the nation-state.” While for Anderson, the novel enables the emergence of national culture, for Guillory, the cultural institutions of the novel reflect a highly restrictive school culture. Which of these two theorists presents the more persuasive argument regarding the connection between nation and narration? We will attempt to answer this question by looking at a range of canonical texts from a variety of national and continental contexts.

toptop

LIT 4188

Caribbean Modernity and Modernism

Leah Rosenberg

This course examines Caribbean literature written in English in the Victorian and Modernist periods, from the 1830s to the 1950s. It emphasizes modernity because many Caribbean writers of the nineteenth century and early twentieth centuries were deeply concerned with representing their homelands as modern societies and with dispelling stereotypical accounts of the Caribbean as primitive, exotic,  and immoral. It highlights modernism because although it is often overlooked Caribbean writers made major contributions to British and U.S. modernist literature. In this period, Caribbean writers produced slave narratives, pirate novels, travel writing, historical romances, and provocative accounts of the inner city – among other texts. “Caribbean Modernity and Modernism” considers the formal techniques, historical context, and political significance of this wide range of genres. It explores how Caribbean writers appropriated, transformed, and debated British and European aesthetics and will explore writers’  engagement with political events and issues: the debate over slavery; indentured labor and the social status of indentured Chinese and Indian workers and their descendants; cultural nationalism, Pan Africanism, anti-imperialism and first Wave feminism.

In the Victorian period we will read  better known texts such as The History of Mary Prince (1831), Wonderful adventures of Mrs. Seacole in many lands  (1857), J.J. Thomas’s Froudacity (1889), as well as, newly rediscovered novels such as Emmanuel  Appadocca: or Blighted Life. A Tale of the Boucaneers (Michel Maxwell Philip, 1854) and Frieda Cassin’s With Silent Tread (@1890)—and historical documents such as documents Maharani’s Misery (ed. Verene Shepherd).  From the early twentieth century, we will read a variety of literary and non-fiction texts, some of which employ modernist aesthetics and/or critique it; these will most likely include Stephen Cobham’s Rupert Gray (1907), Thomas MacDermot’s One Brown Girland— (1909), Herbert de Lisser’s Jane’s Career (1913), Claude McKay’s Banana Bottom (1929), and Jean Rhys’s Voyage in the Dark (1934).  We will also read shorter texts from magazines of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  (In spring 2012, a course on Anglophone Caribbean literature from the 1950s to the early 2000s will be offered, LIT 4192.)

toptop

LIT 4194

Afro-European Literature

Mark Reid

Description  This course examines contemporary literature about and or by Afro-Europeans and Black American expatriates in Western Europe. Weekly readings will cover literature, critical theory, philosophy, and political essays that imaginatively represent the socioeconomic and cultural integration or non-integration of Afro-Europeans (citizens and immigrants in Western Europe) who have ancestral ties to North and sub-Saharan Africa.

toptop

LIT 4194

South African LIterature

Apollo Amoko

This course explores the literatures of South Africa from the nineteenth century to the present.  We will examine, on the one hand, literatures of conquest and colonization and, on the other, literatures of accommodation and resistance; on the one hand, the literature of apartheid and, on the other, literatures of anti- and post-apartheid. In what ways have South Africa’s rich and varied literatures embodied the country’s turbulent past and volatile present? What is the relationship between the relatively autonomous realm of art – aesthetics – and the politics of everyday life – the lebenswelt – in the particular instance of a polity defined by systematic oppression and extreme deprivation? To what extent is this body of writing “African,” that is, an integral part of African literature? To the contrary, is South African writing “exceptional”? What can the problematic status of this literature tells us about identity and difference, race and aesthetics, and coloniality and postcoloniality? The writers studied will likely include Olive Shcriener, Thomas Mofolo, Athol Fugard, John Kani, Winston Nsthona, J. M. Coetzee, Bessie Head, Zakes Mda, Nadine Gordimer, Alex La Guma and Peter Abrahams.

toptop

LIT 4305

Comics & Animation

Donald Ault

Course description not available at this time.

toptop

LIT 4331

Children’s Literature

Anastasia Ulanowicz

This course will provide an introduction to major works of American children’s literature written from 1868 to 2000. As we examine these texts, we will consider how and why (or even whether) they might be read specifically as children’s books – and how, moreover, their study might prompt us to evaluate the American literary canon in its various historical permutations.  Additionally, we will question the ways in which these texts represent race, class, gender, and – perhaps most significantly – national identity.  Of particular interest will be the question of how these texts use the figure of the child to support (or contest) notions of nationhood and citizenship.

toptop

LIT 4333

Literature for the Adolescent

Marilisa Jimenez

The concept of adolescence has been the source of anxiety and contention for decades within Western culture. In this course, we will examine the portrayal of adolescence within popular culture, specifically works about and by adolescents. We will analyze works of literature, criticism, and film for how they reflect issues of gender, race, national identity, patriotism, urban warfare, and other socio-historical themes. The course will require your active participation and engagement with the texts. Assignments will include responses papers, a short close-reading assignment (5 pages), and a long paper or teaching plan with research (8–10 pages).

Possible works (titles subject to change):

toptop

 

LIT 4554

Feminist Theories of Women’s Writing: A Persuasive Perspective

Laurie Gries

How do women persuade through voice, body, and material? What conditions affect, and often constrain, the way women persuade? And what strategies do women use to gain agency for themselves and their communities? In taking up such questions, this course engages with a wide range of feminist and rhetorical theories to study how women have both written and been written throughout history.

Throughout the course, you can expect to encounter feminist scholars and activists such as Judith Butler, Donna Haraway, Andrea Smith, Gloria Anzaldua, bell hooks, Chandra Mohanty, Elizabeth Grosz, and Vandana Shiva who have been widely recognized for their persuasive writing within the academy. However, you will also encounter how women in other spheres around the globe and throughout history have attempted to manipulate their space, bodies, speech, and a diverse range of materials to be heard by others. In these studies, we will learn how in addition to traditional forms of writing, women have sewed, stitched, sang, and spoken their messages to accomplish a variety of persuasive goals. Such studies challenge us to ask: How should we define and study women’s “writing?” What counts as evidence for women’s feminist contributions to history? Whose work should be recovered? And what should come to focus when writing about women in feminist history?

In addition to theoretically engaging with such questions in journal responses and class discussions, you will be expected to complete two formal assignments. In one individual project crafted in print or multi-media form, you will recover a women’s writing/persuasive practice of significance to you. For instance, you might recover female graffiti artists or songwriters or you may recover women whose testimonies, posters, protests, etc. have made important feminist interventions. Drawing on theories covered in class as well as their own research, students will ultimately argue as to why that person/group of women ought to be written into feminist history.

As evident in the questions listed above, throughout the semester, we will also be engaging in theoretical questions about writing women’s history(s). In the second formal writing assignment, you will apply this theoretical knowledge by collaborating with other class members to produce a multi-media archival history of women’s writing. Designed by the class, this digital archive will host your individual projects and offer a collection of diverse educational resources for others interested in the feminist history of women’s writing. Together, then, via this archive, we will write our own history(s) of women’s writing.

toptop

LIT 4930

European Modernism and the Culture of Food

Christina Van Houten

This course will address the intersections of experimental literature and questions of food in context of the history and culture of Europe.  Reading modernism in relation to food becomes a way in which we can read European modernists broaching issues of “taste,” “aesthetics,” and “civilization” with the social conditions of production/consumption, nationalism, and revolution. We will address such topics as: the decline of the long bourgeois century; the gendered domestication of food in post-World War I Europe; the connection between avant-garde cookbooks and fascist governments; the ideologies of military strategy, food rationing, and nationalism; and the effects of Marshall Plan food policy on European postwar reconstruction. This course also has contemporary relevance to European history given the twenty-first-century “food revolution” and its relationship to environmentalism, alternative food politics, and sustainability – of which Europe is the global leader.

We will begin the course by considering the ways in which food production and consumption changed at the beginning of the century with a shift from ruralism and agrarian modes of production to urbanism and industrialization. From this starting point, the course will be divided into three parts: “Modernism and the Anti-Diets,” “War Texts and Scarcity,” and “Late Modernism and Americanization.” The goals of this class are as follows: 1) To demonstrate how modernist narratives of “food” become metonymic of European modernity; 2) To question how “food politics” form a cultural logic that confronts, and to some degree thinks beyond, existing European culture; and 3) to repurpose the residues of this modernism in terms of contemporary European Union policy.

Possible texts include:

toptop

LIT 4930

Variable Topics

Sidney Homan

Course description not available at this time.

toptop

LIT 4930

Black Englishes

James Essegbey

This course is crosslisted with SSA 4930 (0027).

The aim of this course is to take students on a language journey across the globe to look at the Englishes spoken by blacks in Africa and the Americas. Students will learn about their structure and sociohistory as well as watch movies and/or listen to audio clips in the varieties. They will learn concepts like “dialect,” “pidgin” and “creole” which they will use to appraise the languages.

toptop

LIT 4930

The Course of Love

John Cech

A journey through our literary history -- from ancient Sumeria and China to 21st century America, from the epic poem to the contemporary song lyric, from folktales to films, from novels  to reality television – in order to explore the landscape of those emotions we call “love.”  The course will look at the kinds of love (and the genres that express them) that have been sources of awe and celebration on the one hand and the causes of heartache and tragedy on the other. 

toptop

SPC 3605

Speechwriting

Ron Carpenter

Speechwriting is an advanced composition course. In this course, students acquire stylistic prowess by which their sentences have increased potential to be remembered and quoted to achieve greater persuasiveness and resultant acclaim for you as one who uses the English language well in written discourse. The course is called Speechwriting because models to be imitated are in those most quotable sentences of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, John Kennedy, and Martin Luther King, Jr., for examples. Although you practice these stylistic skills while writing speeches, the acquired prowess is applicable in many future communication endeavors, as speakers or writers, regardless of profession. The textbook is Ronald H. Carpenter, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works.

This course is not about supporting arguments or organizing them into broader discourse. For those skills, other courses are more appropriate. Speechwriting is about the best words and their best orders – within sentences – to achieve optimal impress of your ideas upon readers or listeners. Your writing is perfected in drafts that you read aloud in class among peers (and for me), wherein you should acquire a sense of what to do to achieve the final product desired at the semester end. Thus, present drafts when due; listen carefully to other students’ drafts; participate in rewriting others’ sentences; and heed my commentary about all drafts. Do not assume that participation means simply presenting your drafts and listening only to commentary about them.

Your first speech will be written after we analyze and identify specific sources of style in Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and John Kennedy’s Inaugural Address. You will rewrite the Gettysburg Address, as Ted Sorensen would have helped John Kennedy write it. This assignment will improve your flexibility as a stylist. For your third speech, which praises a person for whom you have great love or admiration, you must write for an actual occasion when that person will hear or read your statement (you will earn many “points” from that person as well as other people). For the fourth speech praising an institution or ideal, you will write about something that you are likely to address in later life, perhaps as a professional person (I predict that years later you will take that text from your files and use it again for part – if not most – of a speech that you likely will give).  The second speech that you write in the course, exactly 100 words long, will be explained when the theory behind its persuasive function is explained in detail.

How a draft is presented, vocally and physically, has no bearing on your grade (for help with delivery skills other courses are appropriate; I may make suggestions about how to improve your platform presence, however. This important point merits restatement: Speechwriting is an advanced composition course, wherein you read drafts aloud as bases of discussion by which all students understand how and why some word choices (lexicon) and word arrangements (syntax) in sentences are better than others. For initial and final drafts, I require computer word processing. Revision is easier; spelling is accurate; word lengths of drafts are known.

From past experience, I know reasonably diligent students will achieve some of the stylistic skills taught in this course. Final grades are higher, however, as you (1) demonstrate refined prowess as competent stylists in final drafts submitted for a grade at the end of the semester, (2) understand course precepts derived from readings and lecture materials, as tested by three exams during the semester (the course has no final exam), and (3) produce final research papers about style as defined in this course (research paper options will be explained during a lecture relatively early in the semester and will require additional Web and library reading). In combination, initial drafts, exam answers wherein you demonstrate stylistic prowess, final polished drafts, group projects, and your research paper will total well over 6,000 words evaluated and graded by me for Gordon Rule credit (if you wish to make that claim).

Final grades are determined one–half by the average of your three exam scores and one–half by your final notebook with polished drafts of writing assignments and the research paper—all typed, double–spaced, and turned in at the time and date listed in the University Timetable as the course final exam period. Please know that although this is a writing course, I am impressed—for purposes of grades—by how much you know about style as defined in this course. Moreover, please appreciate that this composition course is unlike virtually all other persuasive writing courses at the University of Florida. The expertise and confidence in the precepts being taught are derived from your instructor’s own published research in six books, several book chapters, and numerous research journal articles (all of which informed my writing of your textbook).

In conclusion, teaching you to be eloquent stylists gives me great personal satisfaction. From my experience as a communications consultant for organizations outside the university (such as corporate executives, lawyers, civic leaders, hospital administrators, public relations professionals, CPAs, and officers attending the U.S. Naval War College), I know that skills acquired in this course will be useful for the rest of your life, no matter what your later profession is. The only prerequisite for the course is ability to write grammatical sentences that are spelled and punctuated correctly.

toptop

SPC 4680

Rhetorical Criticism: Masterpieces of Rhetoric

Ron Carpenter

Our focus this semester is several “masterpieces of rhetoric.” Although many of these are political and presidential discourse generally, another specific focus is rhetoric to persuade Americans about armed conflict abroad. Thus, students will examine how some speakers, writers, and filmmakers appealed successfully to specific attitudes and actions that had profound influence upon the course of future events. The primary goal of the course is students’ refined sense of some rhetorical principles and techniques by which their own future discourse is persuasive.

Unlike previous semesters, the course now has no textbook because much of your course material now is on-line, including that through <http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speechbank.html>. Major class assignments are group projects. By the end of the third week of classes, you should be in a group with 4–5 other class members, who collaboratively will write discourse presented to the entire class for discussion and analyses, but these speeches, in and of them selves, will not be graded.  Instead, for grading purposes, students individually – or in concert with 2 or 3 other peers of their mutual choice – will write for grades short papers identifying and evaluating the rhetorical choices and techniques utilized in the group speeches as presented and discussed in class.  I will be naming, defining, and explaining the rhetorical factors that you likely will find yourself using well (or poorly).  A practical guideline for you to follow is this: if I write a term on the board, the concept should be understood by you, in your class notes, and thereby usable in your future.

I am convinced that when groups argue constructively among themselves about fulfilling assignments (including grammar and compositional prowess), final products are better. For example, after viewing Richard Nixon’s famous – or infamous – “Checkers” speech in 1952, we will study Ted Kennedy’s apologia after Ms. Kopechne died late one night in his company. Then, groups of student speechwriters will create the TV speech that Bill Clinton should have given within 48 hours after Monica Lewinsky first became newsworthy.  For affiliating with other students this semester, one speechwriting group must be all male and another only females; the rest can be any combination. Individuals’ short papers about group speeches yield one-third of students’ final grades.

Your individual short papers (perhaps 3 typed double spaced pages) summarize and expand upon assigned readings that are downloaded, films, and group projects presented in class. The fifth short paper, exclusively an individual effort, will be the enthymeme assignment, which can be any length deemed necessary to attain the desired objective. A longer, individual final paper (7–8 typed pages) will report your individual research about some topic suggested by the course (its focus must be developed in consultation with me so I can endorse in writing to you the appropriateness of your subject and research procedures (this paper will constitute another one-third of your final grade). For some research paper topics, considering the scope of the endeavor, I may approve a collaborative research paper). The course also has an individual “take home” final exam for the final one-third of your grade. Please understand that group projects require meetings with your peers outside of regular class periods. You also are required to view some films outside of class, whether in groups or individually.  As the course progresses this semester, I may amend the syllabus and its topics to take advantage of some current event as a topic for class consideration of rhetorical precepts and principles.

toptop