Undergraduate Courses, Spring 2011

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Upper Division (3000–4000) Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

AML 3271

Survey of African American Literature II

Amy Ongiri

This course will examine African American literature and culture in relationship to the tremendous social, political, and cultural change that characterized the post-war period. Special attention will be given to the ways in which African American social change movements such as Civil Rights, Black Power, and Black Feminism affect African American cultural production and African American aesthetic practices.

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AML 3673

Asian American and African American Interactions

Malini Johar Schueller

This course is cross-listed with AFA 3930, sec. 4477.

Ever since the category Asian-American emerged as a politicized identity in the 1960s, the major pedagogical imperative has been to study the literature and culture of this group on its own in order to legitimize the field itself and to understand its common histories and tropes. African-American literature and culture, affected by legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and Civil Rights, has been thought to belong to a different trajectory. Yet from the very beginnings of major waves of Asian immigration, the two groups have been affected by and interacted with each other. This course seeks to understand the nature of these interactions. How do Asian-Americans see African-Americans and vice versa? What cultural characteristics and histories do they share? How have they been treated as minorities? What are their differences and how have they manifested themselves? What kinds of alliances have these groups created? How have both groups negotiated their Americanness? Ultimately, the course stresses the importance of interethnic studies. 

Tentative Texts:

Requirements: Regular attendance, oral presentation, two 8 page papers, responses to readings.

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AML 4170

Genre Fiction: Westerns and Hardboiled Detectives

Susan Hegeman

This class will explore the emergence and development of two popular American literary genres: the Western and hardboiled detective fiction. We will think about the forms of these two genres, how they developed, and the social and cultural context of their development. We will also consider their adaptation into other media (especially film), and how writers throughout the twentieth century have employed the established genres of the Western and hardboiled detective fiction for a variety of artistic purposes that extend and complicate the idea of genre itself. Authors we may read include Zane Grey, Louis L’Amour, Larry McMurtry, Cormac McCarthy, Annie Proulx, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Chester Himes, Michael Chabon.

Grades will be based upon class participation and two papers of approximately 3000 words each.

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AML 4213

The First U.S. Novels

Ed White

This course offers an introduction to the early US novel from roughly 1790 to 1820. We will examine a number of experiments in writing from this period with a particular focus on first person narratives and satirical fiction. Authors studied may include: Hugh Henry Brackenridge, Royall Tyler, Rebecca Rush, Charles Brockden Brown, Susanna Rowson, Jonas Clopper, Jesse Holman, Thomas Pettengill, Stephen Burroughs, Tabitha Tenney, and of course Anonymous. Please note that this is a reading intensive course.

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AML 4453

Cultures of United States Imperialism

Malini Johar Schueller

This course takes its title from the well-known collection published in 1993 which transformed the field of American studies by making colonialism and imperialism central to conceptions of nation, culture, and identity. The theoretical basis for the course will be the broad field of postcolonial studies and the smaller, but burgeoning field of U.S. empire studies. We will  examine different tropes of empire such as going native, colonial domesticity, imperial eyes, pornotropics, exhibiting empire and remasculinization; at the same time, we will focus on the specific sites of empire such as the “frontier,” Hawai’i, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Vietnam. The course will engage with different forms of U.S. imperialism such as North American settler colonialism, Pacific and continental expansionism, control of far-flung colonies, and empire without colonies. We will also examine some cultural expressions of resistance to empire. The course will include a packet of theoretical readings, readings from U.S. empire studies, and a few novels, short stories,  and personal narratives. I’m not sure exactly which texts I’ll use but I’ll probably include James Smith’s Account, Susanna Rowson’s Slaves in Algiers, Mary Helen Fee’s A Woman’s Impression of the Philippines, Lois Ann Yamanaka’s Blu’s Hanging, Du Bois’ Dark Princess, Roley’s American Son /Fenkl’s Memories of My Ghost Brother, and some writings of William Apess. 

Requirements: responses to readings, oral presentation, two 8 page papers.

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AML 4453

City and Country in 20th-century American Literature

Susan Hegeman

The U.S. is largely an urban and suburban country. Today, only 2% of the U.S. population lives on a farm – down from over 60% in the years before the Civil War. And yet, as some politicians’ invocations of “small town values” remind us, many Americans still hold to an idealized conception of America as a country composed of farmer-citizens. In fact, there is significant tension in American history and literature between the values and ideals associated with rural life and those of the city: freedom and autonomy versus confinement and conformity; simple virtues versus social complexity and sophistication; narrowness and bigotry versus openness and cosmopolitanism.

In this course, we will survey works of literature from the twentieth century in a range of genres to address how this change was represented. Our goal is to consider how Americans have imagined this geographic, economic, cultural, and political change and in turn reimagined themselves as a people.

Grades will be based upon class participation and two papers of approximately 3000 words each.

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AML 4453

The University

Kim Emery

From Thomas Jefferson to Tom Perotta, American writers have explored the meaning of higher education in and to US culture. Their understandings of the University are inevitably caught up with ideas and ideals central to the American experience: the dream of upward mobility, the democratic faith in public deliberation, the myth of meritocracy. Like the country itself, the American University is cross-cut by class, race, and gender. It represents different things to different segments of the population and serves different functions in different circumstances. The University has been a space of conflict and contestation, of conversation and community, of cooperation and of competition. It has been a force for assimilation, a haven for dissent, an agent of repression, and a scene of protest.  It has offered the country both vision and violence. 

Drawing on works from diverse genres, this course will consider various ways in which higher education in general and the research university in particular have been conceived and experienced in the United States. We will read fiction, theory, histories, sociological studies, and advocacy literature, and we will also watch some films. Finally, we will talk with scholars, activists, administrators, and others involved in shaping this University’s present uses and possible futures.

Weekly reading responses, occasional short quizzes, a class presentation, and a final paper/project are required.

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CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

Jill Ciment

This course will be run in the “traditional” workshop fashion with occasional lectures on structure, metaphor, plot, etc. Writing exercises will be assigned at the beginning, but the primary emphasis is on self-generated work. Each student will be expected to write two short stories, as well as complete a final draft of each.

Optimally, students will turn in stories that they have taken as far as they can on their own. The workshop should be a venue to test the waters, to try new things, to present first drafts as well as polished works, but only after the writer has struggled with it to the nth degree. The idea is for students to rigorously challenge themselves. Everyone not presenting work should take their jobs as critics and editors as seriously as they take their own writing.

Reading will be assigned.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 15, 2010 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

David Leavitt

What is a short story? No genre has so consistently eluded definition. Stories can range from eighty pages (Thomas Mann’s “Death in Venice”) to a single sentence (Amy Hempel’s “Housewife”). The purpose of this seminar will be to explore the parameters of this seductive and evasive form, from the standpoint both of the practitioner and the reader.

The seminar will be built around the idea that writers learn by reading. Therefore you may find the reading load heavier than is typical for a fiction workshop. Each week you will be asked to read a selection of stories by an English or American writer, and to arrive in class prepared to discuss them cogently. This conversation will take up roughly a third of our allotted time; the other two-thirds will be devoted to discussion of your own work (presented according to a pre-arranged schedule) and occasional in-class exercises.

For the first several weeks, I’ll be giving you assignments of a vaguely experimental nature – for instance, to tell a story from the viewpoint of an historical figure of your own choosing (Janis Joplin, Jack the Ripper). You’ll then set to work on stories of your own devising, which may have evolved from these exercises. The requirement of the class, in terms of writing, is that you complete two stories, the first by midterm and the second by term’s end. (The second may be an outgrowth of the first.) It goes without saying that attendance is mandatory, and that failure to show up (along with failure to do the reading) will have an adverse effect on your final grade. Grading will be based on your informed participation in the seminar, the critical acuity you show when judging other students’ writing, and your willingness to work hard: to be the best writer you can be, and to emerge at the end of the semester a better writer than you were at the beginning.

The reading many include stories by John Cheever, Flannery O'Connor, Grace Paley, Amy Hempel, Mary Robison, and Denis Johnson.

Final note: although flexibility is essential to any writing workshop, so is structure. The same can be said – and must be said – of the writing process.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 15, 2010 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry

William Logan

“Poorly depicted clouds – which most people would not notice as wrong – are so disturbing to Dr. Thornes that they almost spoil visits to museums. For a meteorologist, the distraction is as great as the ordinary viewer being confronted by a figure with three arms. . . . [He added that] too many artists had painted [clouds] as they would a backcloth in a theatre.”

The Guardian (London), 9 August 2000

In this workshop we will attend to words as closely as a painter attends to paint – or to clouds. You will read a broad selection of modern poetry, from Emily Dickinson to Gjertrud Schnackenberg, and write a poem a week. Every week the workshop will consider for discussion poems from the past and poems from students. This is an advanced workshop in poetry, for students who have already taken at leats one lower-division workshop (CRW 1301 or CRW 2300) and want to press their understandings of poetic language even further. 

Email or hard-copy submission of your manuscript is necessary for early registration. I’m out of the country and cannot read hard copy. Please submit four poems to me at <wlogan@english.ufl.edu> in one attachment in .rtf format.  Mention the workshops you have previously taken.

Reading list:

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 15, 2010 deadline.

topManuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry

Michael Hofmann

Course description not available at this time.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 15, 2010 deadline.

topManuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 4905

Advanced Seminar in Fiction Writing

Padgett Powell

This course is the last in our series of undergraduate workshops in fiction writing. Its objective is to help you or make you write better fiction, arguably the objective of any workshop worth anything. As the last of our courses, however, this one seeks to make the three or so pieces you will tender lasting, able-bodied fictions you can show off, apply to graduate programs with, or publish. The fall is the time to prepare manuscripts for submission to graduate schools in writing if you are intending to prosecute that voyage. This is also the time you become the best undergraduate writer of fiction you can become. 

Standard workshop format.  I anticipate full efforts at writing well, at criticizing for the benefit of others, at attending religiously, at speaking cogently when you can, at surrounding yourself in the mantle of intelligent reticence when you can’t.

We will read two books of fiction as technical models selected from among William Trevor, Kent Haruf, Flannery O’Connor, Lydia Davis, Franz Kafka, and Samuel Beckett. And others, should something come up.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 15, 2010 deadline.

linkManuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 4906

Advanced Seminar in Poetry Writing

William Logan

“Just as the civilization of the Kelts is revealed to us by their dolmens, and that of the Scandinavians by their mounds and kitchen-middens, so will the antiquaries of future times immediately recognise the spots inhabited in India by the English by the piles of soda-water bottles heaped up before the cantonments, and the dwellings of the Americans by their deposits of empty meat tins.”

– Edmond Baron de Mandat-Grancey, Cow-Boys and Colonels, 1887

Poetry must be about hells and heavens, hills and halls, hopscotch and hiphop, and empty meat tins. We will be looking in language for the equivalent of things felt and seen. You will seek this in the words used by other poets, and those you invent for yourself. Be prepared to read until your eyes hurt, to write a dozen poems (one per week), and to find your poems criticized. Each week the workshop will discuss your work and the work of your predecessors.

This is Florida’s most advanced workshop in poetry, for students who hope to become poets and possibly attend an MFA program – or those who have merely developed an obsessive and perverse interest in writing.  Students from this class have gone on to the University of Iowa, University of Virginia, Columbia University, University of Michigan, and other programs.  

Required reading:

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 15, 2010 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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ENC 3310

Advanced Exposition

Christopher Gage

ENC 3310 Advanced Exposition is designed specifically to improve the overall clarity, coherence, elegance, and personality of your academic and professional compositions. It focuses on the art as well as the craft of expressing original, compelling ideas and well-researched arguments in such writings. Style will be our primary concern. By style, I mean the mechanics behind crafting and organizing strong sentences and paragraphs. However, we will also consider elements of style in terms of uniqueness of ideas and originality of expression. Guided by such principles for achieving clarity, grace, and originality of style, we will examine and critique a wide range of texts, from academic essays and professional reports, to contemporary media (film, television, magazines, online texts) and other examples of pop culture. This course satisfies all Gordon Rule requirements.

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ENC 3310

Advanced Exposition

Chad Newsom

In this course, we will read and write essays pertaining to various expository modes (definition, classification, compare/contrast, etc.). We will spend much of our time on principles of revising prose, and you will develop the necessary skills for a clear, concise, and graceful prose style. You will write 4–6 short papers, have short, in-class writing assignments, and take frequent reading and grammar quizzes.

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ENC 3312

Advanced Argumentative Writing

Rex Krueger

This course will address making and writing arguments. We will spend the first few weeks of the semester studying a variety of rhetorical and argumentative techniques. The remainder of the semester will focus upon generating written arguments and studying specific points of style.  After the first five weeks, students will practice the fundamentals of argument and style through weekly essays and one-on-one conferences with the instructor. 

Students will be responsible for generating their own paper topics and there will be an emphasis on self-evaluation throughout the semester.

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ENC 3312

Advanced Argumentative Writing

Camelia Raghinaru

This advanced composition course will focus on critical analysis and the writing of arguments. We will examine different methods of argumentation, rhetorical techniques, and stylistic devices, and we will apply them to the analysis of texts. Writing clear and persuasive arguments is the ultimate goal of the class. Your writing will incorporate the argumentative techniques learned in class, and you will be expected to generate your own topics. Periodically you will assess your own writing performance and will meet with the instructor for one-on-one conferences.

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ENG 3011

A Splice of Life: Biopolitics and Biotechnics

Richard Burt

This course will consider biopolitics in terms of the role of the scientist as sovereign over what counts as (bare) life, when it begins, what can experimented on (animal and human) and for what purposes (various forms of reproduction, including cloning and nanotechnologies), how “postvital“ life is maintained (dead persons stored for future reanimation), and whether the science of homo sacer / biopolitics constitutes a desacralization of “life.“ Readings will include philosophical and political texts by Agamben on homo sacer and scientists experimenting on humans, Foucault on biopolitics, Freud on the repetition compulsion, Derrida on the animot and Artaudian reproduction, Ronell on testing, Wills on the posthuman, on the one hand, and readings in science studies: Thompson on the lab, Latour on experiments, Stengers on science, Doyle on cryonics. The readings are many, demanding, difficult, and rewarding. A consideration of biotechnics – how machines (technology) and bios are related (nanotechnology, bioengineering, Heidegger on techne and Dasein), of the human and posthuman (if there is such a thing) – will also be crucial topics of the course. Films to include Bladerunner, The Boys from Brazil, 28 Days Later, Max Payne, The Jacket, Dark City, The Manchurian Candidate (Jonathan Demme, 2004), The Parallax View, State of Siege, and Splice. (You will have to see these films on your own.)

For more information, go to <http://www.clas.ufl.edu/~burt/spliceoflife/>

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ENG 3110

Theorists: Sedgwick and Johnson

Stephanie A. Smith

This course is crosslisted with WST 3930/sec.1591.

During the 1980s and ‘90s Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick and Barbara Johnson emerged as two voices that altered literary critical thinking. Sedgwick’s initial texts, Between Men and Epistemology of the Closet were foundational for a new field: queer studies. Barbara Johnson incorporated a variety of perspectives into an interdisciplinary study as demonstrated in The Critical Difference and A World of Difference. As a scholar, teacher, and translator, Johnson helped make French philosopher Jacques Derrida accessible to the United States at a time when he had just begun to gain recognition in France. Deconstruction is, in Barbara Johnson’s phrase, “a careful teasing out of warring forces of signification within the text.”

Required Reading List

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ENG 3011

Theorists: Walter Benjamin

Ed White

This course offers an introduction to some basic problems of literary and cultural theory through the career of Walter Benjamin. We will read across the range of his writings, from his literary-critical essays (on the Romantics, Kafka, Proust, Goethe, and the surrealists); his writings on theater (with special attention to Bertolt Brecht’s “epic theater”); his experimental travel and autobiographical pieces (on Moscow, Berlin, and hashish); his explorations of old and new media (from “The Storyteller” and children’s book illustrations, to “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproducibility” and his writings on photography); and his philosophical reflections on history, violence, religious belief, and revolution. We will end by reading some of the variants of his final major project – on Paris, Baudelaire, and historical consciousness – before his death in 1940. 

The course will have a steady and demanding reading load, and weekly writing. No great familiarity with critical theory is assumed or expected.

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ENG 4015

Psychological Approaches – Philip Roth

Peter L. Rudnytsky

This course will explore Philip Roth’s encounter with psychoanalysis through readings of selected major works as well as an exploration of the links between his life and his art. The texts to be studied include Goodbye, Columbus, Portnoy’s Complaint, My Life as a Man, The Professor of Desire, Zuckerman Unbound, The Counterlife, The Facts, Sabbath’s Theater, and I Married a Communist. Insight into the biographical roots of Roth’s creativity will be provided by writings by Roth’s analyst, Hans Kleinschmidt, his lover, Janet Hobhouse, and his ex-second wife, Claire Bloom. Course requirements: midterm, final, and one five-page paper. Regular attendance and active participation in class discussions are expected.

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ENG 4110

Documentary & Propaganda

Scott Nygren

Documentary has always been one of the most vital areas of filmmaking, and has recently become a field where new forms of social agency and persuasion have emerged in a digital context. This course will juxtapose many of the classic films that created the concepts of “documentary” and “propaganda” with more recent work and current cultural theory that contest the visual representation of social and historical issues.

It seems impossible now to grasp one of the central underlying preoccupations of the 20th century, on which “documentary” was founded and had its effects: the supposed bond with reality so long attributed to the camera image. Through such incidents as the scandal surrounding the digitally altered image of O.J. Simpson on the cover of Time magazine in 1994, public opinion seems finally to have acknowledged what artists and activists have long known – that the camera is no guarantee of the truth of what is seen. Film’s illusory “realism” appears in retrospect to have been constructed through the historical combination of camera imagery with a centralized economy restricting channels of communication to the few.

Since digital photography has now erased any fantasy of necessary realism attached to use of the camera, and the relative decentralizations of personal video and the internet have equally erased the concentration and control of communication among a narrow elite, conditions have drastically changed and rethinking is necessary. Is documentary possible? Is everything propaganda? Yet much of what passes for documentary theory still seems a delayed reaction to past conditions, rather than an active working through of present possibilities.

Political and avant-garde practices have already reconstituted film and video as alternative constructive strategies, instead of the positive identification with “realism” that previously prevailed. The camera image has become a kind of text, like the body or the alphabet, which can be characterized by its specific point of entry into the materiality of culture, history and the environment. 

Documentary and propaganda might now be reconsidered as visual rhetorics of description and persuasion that embody competing configurations of knowledge and power. The legitimation of media texts derives not from the guaranteed truth of camera images, but from discursive contexts. Originally drawn from anthropology, sociology and political theory, these discourses are increasingly inflected by cultural theorization of the narratives which shape science and philosophy in a Western context.

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ENG 4110

Polish Science Fiction & Fantasy: Fiction, Films, Artwork

Christopher Caes

This course is crosslisted with EUS 3100/sec. 4682 & PLT 3930/sec. 6343.

This is a course in surviving futures, a phrase which we will seek to unfold in three specific ways. First, we will examine Polish SF & F films and narratives not merely as representations of “the” future or, conversely, of impossible worlds, but as reflections of the ways in which Poles have survived different improbable, yet historical futures. The future arrived in Poland quite unexpectedly at multiple intervals throughout the course of the past century, whether in the form of sudden, ultimately only imperfectly exploited opportunities to establish Western-style free-market democracies or in the form of foreign-imposed totalitarian or authoritarian sociotechnic projects aimed at the total transformation of life. It is this catastrophic, essentially experimental history which the SF & F of Poland incessantly interrogates and simulates, escapes only to repeat. Second, because they are not the products of a mass-market consumer industry, Polish SF & F films and narratives have neither the comfort nor the security of spectators and readers as their aim, thus even the briefest exposure to them inevitably confronts one with the practical question of how to survive the event of the viewing or reading experience itself. Self-consciously experimental, Polish SF & F films and narratives seek, by turns, to elude and attack, to sicken or seduce, therefore surviving them – interpretively, perceptually, physiologically – requires something of a spectatorial or readerly “athleticism.” To this end, we will school ourselves in the invention and performative elaboration of new, alternative – ascetic, therapeutic, transgressive – strategies of spectatorship and artistic reception. Finally, throughout our exploration of Polish SF & F, we will consistently seek to fashion original, unlooked-for perspectives on the two mutually interrelated questions of whether, in our present form, we can survive any of the possible futures which await our world today and of whether the idea of the future – a future, however improbable – can still exist today as a project in ways that are capable of seizing the contemporary imagination.

Films (selection):

Fiction (selection):

Art (selection):

Comics:

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ENG 4133

Films of the Fifties

Maureen Turim

A decade now seen in the popular culture as conformist and complacent, though stylishly so, will be explored in this class through many of its outstanding films from the US and abroad. We will explore the complexity of cultural forces at work as the world adjusts to the aftermath of World War II. The atomic bomb, the shadow of the Holocaust, the Cold War, the growth of the military-industrial complex, the confrontation with racial segregation, the growth of consumerism, rock and roll, and suburbia will provide the context. Spectacle, widescreen and color compete with the intimate problem film, whose black and white images explore the grittier realism of the decade. We will primarily examine films made in the US, but a third of the course will be devoted to films from Japan, France, India, Italy and Poland in which the art of filmmaking begins to explore new aesthetic directions. From the US we will look at Fifties' genres such as Westerns, Sci-fi and musicals as well as socially conscious films that explore such issues as racism and corporate greed. The family in Fifties film is often one beset with problems; whereas films’ new competitor, television, often idealized the family in light-hearted situation comedies, films were more likely to question such aspects of family life as women’s restricted roles, paternal distance, and juvenile rebellion. This course will be useful to a wide range of students – certainly both literature and film and media majors, but also students of sociology, history, psychology, theater and art history.

On time attendance and active participation in class discussion is essential. Students must attend all class screenings. Since discussions will critically evaluate readings and films, assigned texts must be read prior to scheduled meetings. Participation on the e-learning website will allow students to further engage with the readings and films, and is required. There will be two papers, 7–8 pages each; prospectuses and outlines of each will be turned in for approval before the final drafts of the papers. Your ability to speak and write clearly and effectively, as well as the strength of your theoretical and analytical argument, will be the basis for evaluating discussion and papers.

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ENG 4133

Ashes of Cinema: Philology, Film Restoration, and Deconstruction

Richard Burt

This course will pursue broad, often irresolvable questions about the remains of cinema related to “re-mastery”: attribution, restoration, decomposition, decay, ownership, and forgery by comparing film with two other media that raise similar questions in different ways, namely, the book (both illuminated manuscript and print codex) and oil painting. Beginning with Orson Welles’s F for Fake, we will examine art forgery in light of “scientific” media used to attribute, date, and determine the authenticity of a work of art. We pay particular attention to the limited ways different media may be used to sort out conflicts (such as determining whether a painting is genuine or fake and who “signed” it through the latest X-Ray cameras and most up-to-date scientific experts). Restoration and forgery are sometimes difficult to tell apart. Additionally, we will examine the emergence of art forgery in the Renaissance. In the second part of the course, we will focus on the re-mastering of film prints in light of philology and textual criticism to examine contradictory ways in which DVD editions of films such as Touch of Evil, Mr. Arkadin, and Apocalypse Now: Redux are “restored.” We will also look at a number of digital restoration comparisons on DVD editions of older films and achronic options for modern and original soundtracks on silent films and for multiple versions of the same film. We will then turn to deconstruction and restitution, attribution theory, and auteur theory, reading Derrida on the signature and painting with Peter Greenaway’s Nightwatching and John Frankenheimer’s The Train.  For more information, go to <http://www.clas.ufl.edu/~burt/filmphilology/>

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ENG 4133

Screenwriting

Mary Robison

The class is an introduction to screenwriting, and a very thorough study of the screenplay’s many conventions and aspects. Put simply, you will learn the form in all its parts and develop (or refine) your abilities at writing different elements. Exercises include writing a montage, for instance, and writing a series of shots (as used in chase scenes, gunfights, or barroom brawls), working with memory,
dreams, and flashbacks. In addition to class meetings, there will be an indie film shown each week which you will be required to attend, view, and critique in writing.

If you decide you seriously want to pursue the course, please send me a Letter of Interest – two or three pages about yourself, detailing your interest in film, your background in general, and in specific if you have writing experience here or elsewhere or have studied or worked in film. Earnestness, originality, curiosity, intellect, knowledge of films, writing experience, and enthusiasm for the subject are all points on. Please also include your full name, student ID #, and what class year you are, as upperclassmen may be given seats first since they might not have another chance to take the course.

No other writing sample is necessary, but please send your Letter of Interest to my email address (profrobison@gmail.com) in the next few weeks, and certainly by October 18 at the latest. There are many applicants for the fifteen seats, and we usually end up disappointing
latecomers.

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ENG 4133

Vampire Cinema

Dragan Kujundzic

Course description not available at this time.

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ENG 4134

Women in Film

Maureen Turim

This course will examine how women have been represented in film, how they have participated in film production, and how they consume film images. We will look at several feminist approaches and the range of debates as to how to address these issues.

The course will have several goals:

Emphasis will be on such basic issues as viewer identification, the articulation of social values, and the function of cultural context, as currently formulated through various feminist and post-structuralist methodologies. We will explore how feminism intersects with psychoanalysis, ideology, deconstruction, and related approaches. We will examine the conjuncture of theoretical issues with an experience of specific films. We will look at the function of these films in the past, and in present reworkings of history.

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ENG 4135

New German Cinema

Heather Bigley

This course is crosslisted with GET 4293, sec. 3854)

Course description not available at this time.

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ENG 4136

Video Production

Roger Beebe

This course is designed as an introduction to a broad range of practices sometimes labeled “experimental video.” The focus of the course will be exclusively on non-narrative approaches to the theory and practice of videomaking. Students will work on a number of short projects throughout the semester (about one every two weeks) that engage simultaneously with different theoretical problems, technological challenges, and aesthetic strategies. The projects will span all of the stages of video production from conception to sound editing as well as a wide variety of aesthetic forms. The course will conclude with a short final project of your own devising that grows out of one or a number of the theories and formal approaches that we have explored during the semester.

No previous experience with video production is required (or even expected) – what is necessary is a willingness to throw out all preconceptions and submit to the experimental nature of the course. Interested students should contact the instructor via email at <rogerbb@ufl.edu> as early as possible (at least a week before the beginning of advance registration if possible), because seats are very limited.

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ENG 4146

Experimental Experiments

Roger Beebe

While every film and video production course I teach focuses narrowly on experimental practices, this one goes way beyond those. For students looking for the farthest reaches of experimental practice, this one’s for you. We’ll cover lots of advanced (and primitive) techniques for making moving images, mostly on celluloid. We’ll build our own praxinoscopes and/or zoetropes. We’ll learn to hand process hi-contrast film in tupperware, build our own contact printers using sync blocks, flashlights, and toilet paper tubes, make Rayographs, and use an optical printer. We’ll curate a show of found oddities from the cast offs of the public library system and make a bunch of flickering oddities of our own (from flipbooks to films). This will be the best class you have ever had if the above sounds good to you.  If it doesn’t, STAY AWAY.

There’s an application process, and it begins a few weeks before advance registration begins. If you’re interested in this class, email <rogerbb@ufl.edu> to request an application.  NO PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE WITH FILM or VIDEO PRODUCTION NECESSARY (although preference will be given to students who have taken other Film and Media Studies classes, especially ENG 2300: Film Analysis, ENG 3115: Intro to Film Theory, or the film history series (ENG 3121, 3122, “3123”)). A willingness to accept an open and exploratory class and to abandon all preconceptions is required.

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ENG 4844

Queer Theory

Kim Emery

This course offers an introduction to major concerns, methodologies, and texts in queer theory, a field concerned with the construction and experience of gender, sex, and sexuality. We will work closely with foundational texts in the field and will also explore their usefulness in analyzing and engaging current issues such as trans politics, “gay marriage,” and the organization of university curricula.

No prior knowledge of the field (or of critical theory generally) is required or expected; however, prospective students should be aware that many – not all – of the required texts are densely written and conceptually challenging. Class discussion will be critical to clarifying the arguments and implications of these readings, and we will work together to explore the relevance of the theories to contemporary culture in general and LGBT lives in particular. 

Assigned readings will include works by Michel Foucault, Gayle Rubin, David Halperin, Tomás Almaguer, Judith Butler, Jack Halberstam, Jay Prosser, Elizabeth Freeman, Roderick Ferguson, Ann Cvetkovich, and Eve Sedgwick, among others. More than simply the study of theory (i.e., of other people’s theories), this class comprises an incitement to theorize. Regular attendance, thorough preparation, and active engagement will be required of all participants. Also required are two exams, two papers, one group project/presentation, and frequent brief homework assignments.

ENG 4844 is a core course for the undergraduate minor in Theories and Politics of Sexuality offered through the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research.

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ENG 4905

Independent Study

Faculty Member of Choice

An Independent Study course may be taken for 1 to 3 credit hours, but will only count toward the fulfillment of the 10-course requirement for the English major if a student registers for 3 credit hours.

This course is for advanced students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The student must find a faculty member who is willing to supervise the semester-long study, and together, the two create a project. The student must meet with the professor at designated times, agreed upon in advance, and complete all assignments in a timely manner.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Storytelling

Robert Ray

When a character in Doris Lessing’s Golden Notebook suggests that she could turn a serious novel into a romance simply by leaving out certain kinds of words, we remember the old lesson:  how stories get told makes all the difference. This course will examine the storytelling choices made by writers and filmmakers by starting with the effect those choices have on us as readers or viewers. Since the course assumes no previous study of the cinema, English majors concentrating on literature should not fear starting from behind. Conversely, however, students interested primarily, or exclusively, in film should note that we will devote more than half our time to literature.

Readings will include stories by Hemingway, Chekhov, Turgenev, Doyle, Borges, and Hardy; novels by Simenon, Penelope Fitzgerald, and Anthony Powell. We will watch movies by Kiarostami (Tickets), Vigo (L’Atalante), Capra, (It Happened One Night), and others.

Assignments: weekly reading quizzes, two oral presentations, two written assignments (short papers or take-home exams).

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: The Child in Twentieth Century American Literature

Anastasia Ulanowicz

The twentieth century has been called the “American century.”  Not insignificantly, it has also been termed the “century of the child.” In this course, we will investigate the relationship between twentieth-century concepts of childhood and contemporaneous articulations of United States national identity. We will pay particularly close attention to the ways in which the figure of the child has been employed in literary narratives in order to mythologize – and demythologize – notions of American identity and history. We will also question the manner in which the fantasy of childhood innocence has been placed in the service of the fantasy of American exceptionalism.

Over the course of the semester, we will read canonical works of fiction (e.g., novels by James, Nabokov, Roth and Morrison) as well as more recent, hybridized forms (e.g., M.T. Anderson’s The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing and Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home).  Our discussions will be informed by popular studies of childhood (e.g., Neil Postman’s The Disappearance of Childhood and Thomas Hine’s The Rise and Fall of the American Teenager); works of critical theory (e.g., Lee Edelman’s No Future); and scholarly interventions in the field of American studies (e.g., R.W.B. Lewis’s The American Adam and Donald E. Pease’s The New American Exceptionalism). 

Successful completion of the course depends upon participation in seminar discussions, the composition of weekly written responses, and the production of a final seminar paper.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: The Pen & The Penitentiary: The Prison in American Literature

Jodi Schorb

This is a seminar on the history and literary influence of the American prison.

Our readings will be drawn from three primary areas: historical pamphlets by prison reformers, non-fiction accounts penned by prisoners, and literature (primarily novels and short fiction) in which the penitentiary plays a thematic or structuring role. Secondary critical work on theories of the carceral (by Michel Foucault, Angela Davis, Caleb Smith, and others) offers an apparatus to understand the carceral imagination and its literary and systemic effects.

Beginning in the 1780s, American prison reformers joined a transatlantic debate about the value and promise of reformative incarceration. Philanthropists, physicians and tourists visited American penitentiaries and debated the value of capital punishment, the impact of solitary confinement, and the effectiveness of penitential reform. The result was the transformation of punishment and the invention of the modern prison.

After reading from this lively archival history, we will consider the way the new knowledge, debates, and architecture of the penitentiary shaped the development of nineteenth-century American fiction, in part through what Caleb Smith has named the “Poetics of the Penitentiary” – narratives of rebirth structured upon the convict’s civil or virtual death.  Authors include Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allen Poe, and Herman Melville, plus select twentieth-century American fiction and poetry.

Literature penned by prisoners also gained notoriety and influenced public debates around social justice; we will therefore read inmate-authored texts, including works by  Henry David Thoreau, Jack London, Agnes Smedley, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, and others.

Together, the readings and coursework will help students link the development of the prison to the carceral imagination in American literature.  Students will be encouraged to conduct research on an inmate author of interest, and the course will blend guided discussion of readings with archival work, short writing assignments, and a final 12–15 page paper.

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ENG 4940

Internship

Undergraduate Coordinator

The English Department at the University of Florida offers three* credit hours of internship to its majors who provide the following to the Undergraduate Coordinator for approval:

Once the Undergraduate Coordinator has approved the internship requested by the student, the department will register the student for the internship credits.

Upon completion of the internship:

*For two credit hours, the student would need to work 8 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 16 hours per week for Summer A or B.

*For one credit hour, the student would need to work 4 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 8 hours per week for Summer A or B.

Please note the following limitations on the English Internship:

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ENG 4953

Department Seminar: Milton

Peter Rudnytsky

This seminar will begin with Milton’s prose defense of unlicensed printing, Areopagitica, and then proceed to a close reading of his epic masterpiece Paradise Lost. Attention will be given to theological and political dimension of Milton’s work, with special emphasis on issues of gender and psychology. One-page response papers will be assigned to assess proficiency in writing, and an eight- to twelve-page seminar paper will be required. Regular attendance and active participation in class discussions are expected.

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ENG 4970

Honors Thesis Project

Faculty members (2) of Choice

Students must have have completed at least one semester of ENG 4936, Honors Seminar. Open to English Honors students.

The student must select two faculty members: one to direct the reading, research, and writing of a thesis on a topic of the student’s and director’s chosing, and another as the second reader. An abstract (100 to 200 words) and one copy of the thesis (30 to 50 pages) must be delivered to the CLAS Academic Advising Center on Fletcher Road at least 10 days before graduation.

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ENL 3122

The English Novel: Nineteenth Century

John Wiehl

This course will provide students a broad background to the nineteenth-century English novel. The long nineteenth century saw many political, intellectual, and cultural upheavals: increased voting rights, the ascent of science and rationalism over sentiment and spirituality, and rethinking the gender roles of men and women. These topics will be addressed in this course as will genre-related questions, such as how poetry influences the novel and how do different genres of the novel (sensibility, realism, Gothic, historical, sensation, etc) think the world or work politically. Other topics we will consider include constellations such as: the nation, the colonies, the fate of empire; the role of London and the surrounding countryside; education; Darwinism, intellectual history, pre-Freudian psychology.

Very brief theoretical and (possibly) literary criticism readings will allow us to consider how contemporary literary scholars approach the period.

As should be clear, this course will not cover one topic in extensive detail but will provide a broad and deep background to many different ideas affecting novelists during the nineteenth-century. Class discussions will be required and will range very broadly over both the students’ and instructor’s various interests.

This course requires a great deal of reading. Please be sure that you have the ability and time to complete this amount of reading before signing up for the course. There will be short writing assignments, quizzes, and tests in addition to the reading and discussion portions of the course. There will NOT be long papers or extensive research required in this course, but you must devote a great deal of time to the reading to complete the course successfully.

Reading list (feel free to get a foothold on the reading over winter break if you like, as I have settled on these texts):

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ENL 3154

Modern British Poetry

Marsha Bryant

This course provides in-depth analysis of W.B. Yeats, Wilfred Owen, T. S. Eliot, W.H. Auden, Stevie Smith, Philip Larkin, Ted Hughes, Kwesi Johnson, and current Laureate Carol Ann Duffy. We’ll look at their poems, lives, and cultural contexts. As we move across the semester, we’ll find that gender, family, and nation become increasingly dislocated as traditional concepts of “British” and “British poetry” begin to shift. Careful preparation and active participation are required. Course assignments include quizzes, two papers, a panel presentation, and a parody.

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ENL 3210

Medieval English Literature

R. Allen Shoaf

In this course, we will read, in their entirety, Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Patience, and the Alliterative Morte Arthure. We will read selections, some substantial, from Julian of Norwich’s Revelations of Divine Love, The Book of Marjorie Kempe and Thomas Malory’s Morte d’Arthur.

In preparation for reading these medieval texts, we will spend the beginning of the term reading major Latin authors who are known to have been directly and powerfully influential on medieval English writers, including (but not necessarily limited to) Virgil, Ovid, St. Augustine, and Boethius. 

Students will take one examination in class and write two short essays (5-7 pages), the first due at midterm and the second at the end of term. There will be no final examination. Extensive use will be made of resources available on the WWW, and students will be introduced early to a number of major sites containing texts and bibliographies.

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ENL 3231

Age of Johnson

Brian McCrea

Johnson’s life spanned the years 1709-1784. We will focus on his essays from the 1750s (the essays that, along with his Dictionary, made him famous) and on the works of his later contemporaries – Thomas Gray, William Collins, Christopher Smart, Frances Burney. We will place Johnson over against these writers to develop a sense of how he both fit into and rebelled against his age. As background for our study of Johnson, we will begin with selections from John Dryden and Alexander Pope, then study the relationship between Johnson’s most famous poem and the heroic couplets of his great precursors.

Students will write a final examination and will have the option of writing a long paper (10–12 pp.) on a topic of their choice or two shorter papers (5–6 pp.) on topics I suggest. Most classes will open with students writing informally for 5 to 10 minutes on that day’s reading. Class sessions will encourage discussion. The first hour of the Thursday class typically will center discussion upon a single essay. Students who have difficulty speaking in class should see me about other ways to participate.

The examination will include identification and short answer questions. Students will need to know the significance of specific characters, objects, events and quotations. All the questions will come from points repeatedly made in my lectures.

All papers must be word-processed. I am happy to read and comment upon early drafts of papers and encourage e-mail submission of them via attachments in richtext format.

Books:

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ENL 3241

Romanticism

Donald Ault

This course will focus on Blake, Coleridge, and Byron, with some readings in Wordsworth, Keats, and selected literary theoretical texts. The work in the course will emphasize close reading of texts that present interpretive difficulties at the level of their material production (including variant editions, revisions, different versions, spatial layout of syntax, etc.), taking into account the tendency of Romantic texts to resist being “finished.”  We will read these texts against the grain in order to explore interferences within their ideological and textual fields.

Text requirement: course pack from Xerographic Copy Center, 927 NW 13th St. Course requirements: good attendance, productive class participation, several short papers, and a final paper/project.

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ENL 3251

Victorian Literature

Chris Snodgrass

This course will attempt to define the world-views, beliefs, doubts, anxieties, and paradoxes of the Victorian Period, one of the most influential periods in Western history, through a survey of the poetry, fiction, drama, pictures, and critical theory of a few representative artists, including both canonical figures such as Tennyson, Arnold, Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Oscar Wilde, as well as some several lesser known (mostly women) writers. We will be reading virtually no novels; rather, the course is mostly designed to introduce you to many of the other artistic forms – and broad intellectual history – of the period.  We will try to probe the assumptions which underlie the works of art we will be studying – the “why’s” implicit in the artists’ approaches to their themes as well as the themes themselves – including an investigation of related cultural issues.

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ENL 4273

20th-Century British Literature

Francesca Marinaro

Course description not available at this time.

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ENL 4311

Chaucer

James Paxson

This course will familiarize students with the major narrative poetry of Chaucer. We will devote most of our study to several of The Canterbury Tales and to Chaucer’s less commonly read and known dream allegories. We will also look at Latin and Italian source materials included in our two textbooks. Students will learn to read Chaucer’s Middle English (the form of the English language from about 1100–1500 CE), and they will be introduced to the principal methodological issues constitutive of contemporary Chaucer studies. That is, they will investigate how Chaucer studies incorporate modern critical theory – especially involving issues of narrative complexity, figurative discourse, the formalism of Chaucerian genre (especially the frame narrative or novella) and the poetic representation of gender. Particular focus will fall upon the issue of subjectivity, since Chaucer, who is often seen as the forerunner of modern novelistic art, lays claim to being the first major author in English to cultivate the poetics of the subjective, the personal, and the psychologically realistic. Class meetings will include lectures, discussion, and, especially early in the term, recitation and spot translation of Middle English.

Required texts, which will most likely be ordered through Goerings Bookstore, will include the Norton Critical Edition of The Canterbury Tales (Kolve and Olson, eds.); the Norton Critical Edition of Dream Visions and Other Poems (Lynch, ed.); and The Cambridge Chaucer Companion, 2nd. ed. (Boitani and Mann, eds.).

Major course work includes: class participation and regular, unannounced quizzes (20%); translation exam (in February, 20%); three papers – the first (5–7 pages) on The Knight’s Tale and The House of Fame; the second (5–7 pages) on classical myths, biblical stories, or folktales that served as sources for Chaucer (20%; note that this second project might take the form of an in-class midterm exam); the third (5–7 pages) on a critical or thematic problem concerning The Canterbury Tales or the allegories (5–7 pages). All three papers combine to represent 60% of final grade.

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare: Learning by Doing

Sidney Homan

The assumption in all my theatre courses is that the text of a play is not just what is written on the page, but that text in performance, delivered by actors before an audience. This means the play’s text also includes gestures, movement, blocking (the stage picture), and sub-text (what the character is saying inwardly, beneath the lines delivered onstage, as well as the “history” for that character invented by the actor). In the theatre, we would further supplement this text with lighting, sound, set, costumes, props, and make-up. To be sure, one can approach a play in numerous other ways – as literature, as a repository for the thinking of an age, as the springboard for political or cultural issues. But since I work both on campus and in the theatre, as an actor and director, and since the theatre itself is a unique medium with its own aesthetic principles, I approach the plays, with my students, and as a fellow “student,” as something meant to be performed by an actor and ratified by an audience. In the seminar each student has a scene partner with whom he or she stages several scenes each semester. Once performed, the class and I, as co-directors, “work” that scene with the two actors, trying out options, rehearsing it. The emphasis, therefore, is on learning by doing, and I judge student work by intent, what goes into the performance—not by finesse. If there is finesse, that is considered a bonus. Each actor also writes a short paper assessing his or her experience preparing the scene. Performances and scene papers count equally.

In the seminar we will thus consider A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, The Merchant of Venice, Henry IV, Part I, Hamlet, Macbeth, The Taming of the Shrew, Othello, Much Ado about Nothing, and Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, which, of course, offers a playwright’s critique of Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

If you have any questions, by all means e-mail me at shakes@ ufl.edu

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare’s Tragedies

R. Allen Shoaf

This course will be devoted to the ten tragedies Shakespeare wrote in his career, with especial attention to three factors: his transformation of the genre (most especially in King Lear); the rhetorics he renewed (e.g., pun) or refined (e.g., synoeciosis; paradox) to articulate his tragic vision; and his response to the sacramentality of nature that enabled him to comprehend and mourn humans’ catastrophic denials and perversions of nature, sexual nature in particular, in consequence of which self-inflicted optionlessness must lead inevitably to the end of the human.

Mandatory attendance and two essays (5–7 pages in length), along with unannounced quizzes, will constitute evaluation of your performance in the course.

The one text for the course will be the Norton Shakespeare, 2nd edition, which I will order through the university’s stipulated portal.

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LIT 3003

Feminist Fiction

Tace Hedrick

This course is crosslisted with WST 3930 (1943).

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 3041

Studies in Drama: Citizen Comedy & Domestic Tragedy in the Age of Shakespeare

Robert Thomson

A study of a group of plays unified by being set in the contemporary London and environs of their authors in the late sixteenth century or the opening decades of the seventeenth century. The main focus will be upon the texts and their social, political, historical and cultural contexts.

It has been suggested that City Comedy (however we define it) moved to the center of the Elizabethan Stage when Londoners started to reflect upon their new social roles and their urban setting. Social mobility with its attendant pretensions, hypocrisy, greed, pathos etc, arose in the midst of the new middle class society of trade and commerce and gave substance to these plays, as did the threatened state of an increasingly impoverished and newly dependent gentry.

The plays to be studied will be:

Two essays will be set (ca. 2000 words) and in addition there will be a number of in-class tests and oral reports. There will be no final exam. Absences will affect final grades.

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LIT 3043

Modern Drama: Learning by Doing

Sid Homan

The assumption in all my theatre courses is that the text of a play is not just what is written on the page but that text in performance, delivered by actors before an audience.  This means the play’s text also includes gestures, movement, blocking (the stage picture), and sub-text (what the character is saying inwardly, beneath the lines delivered onstage, as well as the “history” for that character invented by the actor).  In the theatre, we would further supplement this text with lighting, sound, set, costumes, props, and make-up.  To be sure, one can approach a play in a thousand ways – as literature, as a repository for the thinking of an age, as the springboard for political or cultural issues.  But, since I work both on campus and in the theatre, as an actor and director, and since the theatre itself is a unique medium with its own aesthetic principles, I approach the plays, with my students, and as a fellow “student,” as something meant to be performed by an actor and ratified by an audience.  In the seminar each student will have a scene partner with whom he or she stages several scenes each semester.  Once performed, the class and I, as co-directors, “work” that scene with the two actors, trying out options, rehearsing it. The emphasis, therefore, is on learning by doing, and I judge student work by intent, what goes into the performance – not by finesse. If there is finesse, that is considered a bonus.

In the seminar, we will thus consider Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, Embers, All That Fall, Play, Eh Joe, Not I, and Come and Go; Harold Pinter’s The Lover, Old Times, Betrayal, and No Man’s Land, Sam Shepard’s True West, Curse of the Starving Class, and Buried Child; and Tom Stopaprd’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.

A word of comfort: whether you have acted before or not, experience in the theatre is not a factor in the seminar.  We use acting as a way of studying the text.  Have no fears on this issue!

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LIT 3173

Identity and Memory in Modern Hebrew Fiction

Ben Horin Shahar

This course is crosslisted with HBR 4930 (3517) and JST 4936 (3515).

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 3173

Motherhood in Modern Hebrew Fiction

Avraham Balaban

This course is crosslisted with HBR 4930 (8463), JST 3930 (4637) and WST 3930 (5331).

The course examines the different representations of motherhood in Hebrew fiction throughout the twentieth century against the background of contemporary theories about motherhood. The course starts with motherhood as it is depicted in the writing of the founders of modern Hebrew fiction (S-Y. Agnon, Dvorah Baron), reviews mothers portrayed by the 1948 generation, then concentrates on the “New Wave” writers of the 1960s, and the new generation of women writers in the 1990s. In the fiction of the 1960s we find three different models of motherhood: a) the overly dedicated, self-effacing mother, who does not leave breathing space to her children; b) the mentally sick mother, who abandons her children (mainly in the fiction of Amos Oz); c) the alienated mother, who is busy pursuing her spiritual journeys (Amalia Kahana-Carmon).

In the last two decades, a new generation of women writers has added several dimensions to these models. With the typical shift of point of view from a child-narrator to a mother–narrator, the concept of the mother as a nurturing, self–sacrificing, almost selfless creature, who lives to serve her children, has almost disappeared. Instead, motherhood is described as a conflict-ridden situation. The tensions associated with motherhood have varied sources: a) the inherent difficulties of motherhood, of giving birth and raising a family (The Ravens by Avirama Golan), b) personal wishes and needs, i.e. the wish to start a new relation and a new family (Tsruya Shalev and Mira Magen), c) the national demands (sending a child to the army; Dolly City by Orly Castel-Blum); d) living with an abusive husband (Sdomel by Lea Eini).

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LIT 3383

African Women Writers

Rose sau Lugano

This course is crosslisted with SSW 4713 (6937) and WST 3930 (0655).

The course we will allow students to explore African women writers and critics, look at their theoretical priorities, literary themes and cultural positions. It is designed to provide students with both a specific and a general view of the status, achievements and experiences of African women in fiction. Using different genres (poems, novels and plays), and diverse texts we will endeavor to understand how women’s literary expression has been shaped by history, culture, and their experiences, as well as see how they are addressing issues of gender in their respective societies. Discussions will focus on issues of identity, oppression, resistance, exile, language, translation and colonialism. Additionally, students will examine how African women writers are using writing itself as a tool for social transformation and critique.

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LIT 3383

Women’s Autobiographies

Renee Dowbnia

This course is crosslisted with WST 3930 (1036).

This course will cover women’s autobiographies from 1970s to the present, including works by African American, Latina, Native American, Caribbean American, Asian American, and Middle Eastern women. We will focus on the various ways women’s autobiographical texts address and problematize issues surrounding identity, subjectivity, agency, history, experience, memory, sexuality, and resistance in their narratives.

Due to the immense scope of the topic, we will pay particular attention to women’s autobiographies that experiment with genre and form, both as a means of self-expression and as way of grappling with the issues listed above. Why do women writers blur the lines between fact and fiction in their autobiographies? How do they weave together interviews, stories, images, quotes, articles, and other seemingly non-autobiographical formats in order to construct their identities and relate their experience to the reader? Genres covered will include “social autobiography,” “bio-mythography,” autobiographical manifestos, graphic memoirs, blogs as autobiography, and more.

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LIT 3400

Internet Literature

Greg Ulmer

The general topic for this seminar is the relationship of technology to literature. Specifically, we will focus on what happens to literary forms and their study in the medium of the World Wide Web. Our interest in part is in the migration of print forms and modes onto the Internet, and also in the emergence of new forms of creativity native to the Internet. Lev Manovich, in The Language of New Media, observes that the cut-and-paste tools of hypermedia authoring embody the aesthetics created by the experimental arts of 1920s modernism. This observation provides a point of departure for our own experiments, investigating the relationship between experimental poetics, the digital medium, and Internet creativity. The primary goal of the course is to adapt the practices of new media creativity to the design of a mode of study native to the Internet. The course is taught in a CIRCA classroom. The course project is created in the blog medium, supplemented by basic photoshop. We will experiment with the design of a new mode of study that takes advantage of the resources of hypermedia and the aesthetics of popular culture and surrealism. The semester project is to design and test the “learning screen,” that does for Internet culture what the “research paper” did for print education. Previous experience with Web authoring (blog, photoshop) is helpful but not required. However, beginners should expect to spend some extra time learning to use the authoring environment.
Required readings (tentative):

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LIT 4183

Nationlism and the Novel

Apollo Amoko

This course explores the relationship imagined between “nation” and “narration.” In Imagined Communities, a landmark study on the origins and spread of nationalism, Benedict Anderson appears to suggest that the novel (along with the newspaper) was central to the possibility of imagining the modern nation. The aesthetic of the novel made it possible to think and narrate the nation in “homogeneous empty time.” Further, Anderson seems to contend that the canonization of literary texts through the school system was instrumental for enabling the intelligentsia to “take the nation to the people.” From this perspective, it is not surprising that literature has historically conceived of its objects of study in fundamentally nationalist terms. In Cultural Capital, a landmark study on the logic of literary canon formation, John Guillory contends that the effect of nationalist legitimization cannot be understood as a property inherent in the aesthetic of the novel (or the newspaper), but rather, is the product of a certain context of reading, “a pedagogical imaginary.” Specific literary works, Guillory insists, must be seen as “the vector of ideological notions which do not inhere in the works themselves but in the context of their institutional presentation, or more simply, in the way in which they are taught.” He makes a firm distinction between pedagogical and national imaginaries, between school and national cultures. In his argument, school culture “does not unify the nation culturally so much as it projects out of a curriculum of artifact-based knowledge an imaginary cultural unity never actually coincident with the culture of the nation-state.” While for Anderson, the novel enables the emergence of national culture, for Guillory, the cultural institutions of the novel reflect a highly restrictive school culture. Which of these two theorists presents the more persuasive argument regarding the connection between nation and narration? We will attempt to answer this question by looking at a range of canonical texts from a variety of national and continental contexts.

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LIT 4194

African Literature in English: Issues of Gender & Sexuality

Apollo Amoko

This course examines sexual politics in contemporary African literature. Specifically, we will explore the contested the figuration of the father as the embodiment of a beleaguered patriarchal tradition in canonical postcolonial African literature. We will address, for example, the anxious and tragic performance of traditional masculinity by the protagonist in Chinua Achebe’s foundational novel, Things Fall Apart. In sharp contrast to the protagonist, the novel features “unwarranted improvisations” and “gender performances out of turn” enacted by, on the one hand, effeminate male characters like the protagonist’s much maligned father and son and, on the other hand, his masculine daughter and subversive second wife. The course represents an important revision of conventional interpretations that read canonical African literature in terms of its anti-colonial nationalism and its qualified affirmation of pre-colonial tradition. In short, following Judith Butler, I explore gender trouble in the African postcolony. In addition to Achebe, we will study such other authors as Flora Nwapa, Wole Soyinka, Tayeb Salih, and Ferdinand Oyono.

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LIT 4331

Children’s Literature

Kenneth Kidd

This course considers children’s literature from its beginnings to its current interdisciplinary and popular material forms. We will use literary theory and criticism to illuminate children’s literature (and vice versa) and to think about how written and multimedia texts are circulated and institutionalized.  Requirements include weekly response papers, regular participation, and several longer essays. Students will undertake one research project based in our local and very fabulous Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature.The course will be conducted as a seminar and active involvement is crucial.

Critical readings, on e-reserves, will includes historical materials as well as criticism by Jacqueline Rose, Perry Nodelman, Walter Benjamin, Marah Gubar, Clare Bradford, and Kimberly Reynolds.

Possible texts (subject to change; check with instructor):

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LIT 4332

Literature for Young Children

John Cech

This course is meant to be an introduction to and an exploration of the child’s earliest experiences with literature, from birth until her/his first years in school. We will be interested in the relationships between children’s books and oral literature and the imaginative, aesthetic, moral, and psychological growth of their young audiences. The course is designed to involve the student actively, analytically, and creatively in the study of this subject. Students will be encouraged to develop a first hand sense of how some forms of children’s literature are created; the class will be asked to look at works for children with a critical eye; and students will be urged to do their own “field work,” testing assertioins, questions, and ideas that are raised in the course. Literature for young children is often regarded as the least important literature that one encounters in life, but the intention of this course is to demonstrate that is, arguably, among the most important literary experiences that we all share.

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LIT 4334

The Golden Age of Children’s Literature

Anastasia Ulanowicz

In this course, we will analyze children’s books written during the nineteenth- and early twentieth- centuries – the so-called “Golden Age” of children’s literature.  We will address not only the production and literary significance of these texts, but the ways in which they demonstrate shifting cultural views of children and childhood.  With the exception of Johan David Wyss’s The Swiss Family Robinson, our discussion will be confined primarily to British novels written during this era; however, occasional lectures will attend to contemporaneous children’s texts published in Europe and North America.

The course will begin with an overview of the history of childhood in the West.  We will then examine key theories of childhood (e.g., Locke’s Some Thoughts Concerning Education and Rousseau’s Émile) and their influence on early (pre-Golden Age) works of children’s literature.  Then, we will discuss “proper” Golden Age works such as Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland and J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan.  Later lectures will address various critical positions on a “Second Golden Age” of children’s literature. Moreover, lectures and discussions throughout the semester will remain attentive to the ways in which works created in the “proper” Golden Age have influenced more contemporary children’s texts and cultural notions of childhood.

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LIT 4483

Studies of Viral Circulation 

Laurie Gries

This course explores how visual and digital artifacts emerge, transform, and circulate in what Henry Jenkins calls a participatory culture and Lawrence Lessig calls a free culture.

Throughout the course, we will experiment with various research methods to study and produce viral circulation. More specifically, we will investigate how different artifacts circulate on local, national, and transnational scales; transform in genre, media, and location; and affect material consequences in and across various networks. Such artifacts might include the now iconic Obama Hope image created by Shepard Fairey, the infamous photograph from Abu Ghraib, and the photo of Neda Agha-Soltan, which became the symbol of the Iranian Green Movement virtually overnight.

In studying how things go viral, we will explore how social networking sites such as Flickr, Facebook, and Twitter and other digital technologies accelerate the viral circulation and transformation of artifacts.  You will also learn how guerilla-marketing strategies unleashed in digital and physical settings can be successfully employed to distribute various artifacts in a free culture. Putting this knowledge into practice, you will produce your own media and attempt to make it go “viral” on the UF campus. 

As we engage in such work, we will consider contemporary debates over intellectual property, copyright, and fair use, especially in relation to remix. We will also explore how temporary solutions such as Creative Commons attempt to address antiquated copyright laws that benefit a small group of media conglomerates and deprive average consumers from rights to media production. Through such studies, students can expect to become more informed producers and distributors of their own discourse.

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LIT 4554

Feminist Theories

Stephanie Smith

This course is crosslisted with WST 4930 (1599).

In 1921, after decades of activism, women in the United States were granted full suffrage, and become voting citizens, with a political voice. But that achievement took considerable time and the effort of several generations of American women. This course will take us back through the history of female political agitation in this country, beginning with the “first wave” of abolitionists and suffragettes, starting with Margaret Fuller’s argument for female equality in Woman in the Nineteenth Century and the Seneca Falls meeting of 1848 through the 19th Amendment to the Constitution ratified in 1920. We will then move to the “second wave” of feminism, that arguably began with the publication of Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique in 1962 and is still alive in the political arena today, although some question whether or not there has been, since the 1970’s, a “third wave.” This course will cover a broad range of feminist theories, from literary and cultural theory to political, social and scientific inquiry, while providing a historical look at feminism and womanism in the United States.

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LIT 4930

Black Englishes

James Essegbey

This course is crosslisted with SSA 4930 (0027).

The aim of this course is to take students on a language journey across the globe to look at the Englishes spoken by blacks in Africa and the Americas. Students will learn about their structure and sociohistory as well as watch movies and/or listen to audio clips in the varieties. They will learn concepts like “dialect,” “pidgin” and “creole” which they will use to appraise the languages.

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LIT 4930

Creative Non-Fiction

Michael Hofmann

A course on writing about people and places. The reading-list might have been drawn from nature writing or science or biography, but I have come down in favour of history: from Tacitus and John Aubrey (if available), to Ryszard Kapuscinski and Rajiv Chandrasekaran. We will read the late cult-author W.G. Sebald, Joseph Roth, and Bruce Chatwin, and others. Spoken contributions will be encouraged. Participants will do much writing of and on their own, whether on an array of different projects, or on a single task. Reading and writing, research and style, should all benefit. (I would rather you came wanting to write a book about cuttlefish than on the first twenty years – or indeed the first six months – of your lives, but the latter may be allowable under certain circumstances; I should like it, however, not to preponderate.)

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LIT 4930

Manifestoes for a New European Culture

Patrick McHenry

This course is crosslisted with EUS 3930 (4783).

This course will be focused on the continued use of the manifesto as an experimental and political form of writing taken up by various European avant-gardes (1909–1968) in order to demonstrate how these texts, if read historically, provide a constellation of cultural strategies that challenge existing European cultures. The manifesto, adopted by almost every “ism” of the past century, becomes an avenue for opening up a historical field whereupon we may see the direct intersection of politics, economics, and culture as each is interrogated for a dual purpose: something existing must be negated in order to lead to a new unrealized potentiality. Thus the manifesto maps a continued conversation regarding European culture conditioned by historical markers: the end of the long bourgeois century, WWI and II, fascism, socialism, Americanism, etc. Therefore, we want to ask pertinent questions: In what ways can we see the effects of manifestoes as succeeding or failing in the contemporary EU? For example, in what ways could we deploy the cultural logics developed in the manifestoes to question the authenticity of an idea like global community and the Euro?

We will begin the course by reading Marx’s and Engels’ “The Communist Manifesto” in order to lay foundational questions and note the strategic approaches deployed that carry over into the following century. While we will broadly cover a good deal of the twentieth-century’s “isms” the goal will be three-fold: 1) To demonstrate with primary texts created by the artists (poetry, prose, film, painting, etc.) how the particular “ism” enacted a cultural logic symbolically in its artistic practice (e.g., the Bauhaus and the University); 2) How these artistic practices formed a cultural logic to confront, or think ahead of, the existing European cultures of their respective historical moments; 3) How these strategies and logics, to whatever degree of modification necessary, may be deployed in our present moment to confront the problems of the EU. Thus the course will be a sort of seesaw exercise: we will shuttle between a historical past in order to evaluate a prolonged succession of thinkers and artists who attempt to change our historical future.

Readings will include selections from F. T. Marinetti, Tristan Tzara, Francis Picabia, Marcel Duchamp, André Breton, Kasimir Malevich, Eugene Jolas, Walter Gropius and Lyonel Feininger, Janet Lyons, ed. “Manifestoes from the Sex Wars,” COBRA, Adorno and Horkeimer, Susan Sontag, Frederic Jameson, and Perry Anderson

Required texts:

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LIT 4930

The Other Europeans: Animal Influence on Territorial & Ideological Expansions into the “New World”

Sarah Mitchem

This course is crosslisted with EUS 3930 (7297).

This course is designed to provide an understanding of how Europeans used animals literally, figuratively, and ideologically in their imperial endeavors. We begin our examination with an overview of animal practices in early Europe, and move to the era of colonialism in America (the first of our “New Worlds”). By examining the Western philosophic and scientific notions that re-imagined the human/animal divides we can see how European animals functioned as the other “settlers.” These practices heavily influence current perceptions of animal-human relationships; our course then moves into the twenty and twenty-first centuries to unravel these implications. Sharing Carey Wolfe’s perspective on the term posthumanism, we regard a process that does not exclude the importance of radical technological, informational, emotional, social and economic conditions that fundamentally contribute to human-animal conditions; instead, these innovations are conjoined with viewing humans as one section of an unbalanced natural network. By incorporating contemporary measures we now face another “New World” (global) that challenges us to re-examine our place in rapidly altering ecological conditions. We complete the semester by exploring some of the ways these comprehensions influence our modern world.

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SPC 3605

Speechwriting

Ron Carpenter

Speechwriting is an advanced composition course. In this course, students acquire stylistic prowess by which their sentences have increased potential to be remembered and quoted and thereby achieve greater persuasiveness. The course is called Speechwriting because models to be imitated are in sentences of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, John Kennedy, and Martin Luther King, Jr., for examples. Although you practice these stylistic skills while writing speeches, the acquired prowess is applicable in many future communication endeavors, as speakers or writers, regardless of profession. The textbook is Ronald H. Carpenter, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works.

This course is not about supporting arguments or organizing them into broader discourse. For those skills, other courses are more appropriate. Speechwriting is about the best words and their best orders – within sentences – to achieve optimal impress of your ideas upon readers or listeners. Your writing is perfected in drafts that you aloud among peers (and for me), wherein you should acquire a sense of what to do to achieve the final product desired at the semester end. Thus, present drafts when due; listen carefully to other students’ drafts; participate in rewriting others’ sentences; and heed my commentary about all drafts. Do not assume that participation means simply presenting your drafts and listening only to commentary about them.

Your first speech will be written after we analyze and identify sources of style in Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and John Kennedy’s Inaugural Address. You will rewrite the Gettysburg Address, as Ted Sorensen would have helped John Kennedy write it. This assignment will improve your flexibility as a stylist. For the speech praising a person for whom you have great love or admiration, you must write for an actual occasion when that person will hear or read your statement (you will earn many “points” from that person as well as other people). For the speech praising an institution or ideal, you will write about something that you are likely to address in later life, perhaps as a professional person (I predict that years later you will take that text from your files and use it again for part – if not most – of a speech that you likely will give).

How a draft is presented, vocally and physically, has no bearing on your grade (for help with delivery skills other courses are appropriate; but I may make suggestions about how to improve your platform presence, however). The important point is that Speechwriting is an advanced composition course, wherein you read drafts aloud as bases of discussion by which all students understand how and why some sentences are better than others. For initial and final drafts, I require computer word processing. Revision is easier; spelling is accurate; and word lengths of drafts are known.

From past experience, I know that reasonably diligent students will achieve some of the stylistic skills taught in this course. Final grades are higher, however, as you (1) demonstrate refined prowess as the competent stylist on exams and in final drafts, (2) understand course precepts derived from readings and lecture materials, as tested by three exams during the semester (the course has no final exam), and (3) produce a final research paper about style as defined in this course (research paper options will be explained during a lecture relatively early in the semester and will require additional Web and library reading). In combination, initial drafts, exam answers wherein you demonstrate stylistic prowess, final polished drafts, group projects, and your research paper will total well over 6,000 words evaluated by me for Gordon Rule credit (in case you wish to make that claim).

Final grades are determined one–half by the average of your three exam scores and one–half by your final notebook with polished drafts of writing and the research paper – all typed, double–spaced, and turned in at the time and date listed in the University Timetable as the course final exam period. Although this is a writing course, I am impressed – for purposes of grades – by how much you know about style as defined in this course. Moreover, please appreciate that this composition course is unlike virtually all other persuasive writing courses at the University of Florida. The expertise and confidence in the precepts being taught are derived from your instructor’s own published research in six books, several book chapters, and numerous research journal articles (all of which informed my writing of your textbook).

In conclusion, teaching you to be eloquent stylists gives me great personal satisfaction. From my experience as a communications consultant for organizations outside the university (such as corporate executives, lawyers, civic leaders, hospital administrators, public relations professionals, CPAs, and officers attending the U.S. Naval War College), I know that skills acquired in this course will be useful for the rest of your life, no matter what your later profession is. The only prerequisite for the course is ability to write grammatical sentences that are spelled and punctuated correctly.

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SPC 4680

Rhetorical Criticism: Masterpieces of Rhetoric

Ron Carpenter

Our focus this semester is several “masterpieces of rhetoric.” Although many of these are in the realm of political and presidential discourse, another focus is rhetoric to persuade Americans about armed conflict abroad. Thus, students will examine how some speakers, writers, and filmmakers appealed successfully to specific attitudes and actions that had profound influence upon the course of events. The primary goal of the course is a refined sense of some rhetorical principles and techniques by which their own future discourse is persuasive.

Unlike previous semesters, the course now has no textbook because much of your course material now is on-line through <http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speechbank.html>. Major class assignments are group projects. By the end of the third week of classes, you should be in a group with 5-6 other class members, who collaboratively will write speeches presented to the entire class for discussion and analyses, but these speeches in and of them selves will not be graded. Instead, for grading purposes, students individually – or in concert with 2 or 3 other peers (of their mutual choice) – will write for grades short papers identifying and evaluating the rhetorical choices and techniques utilized in the group speeches as presented and discussed in class. I am convinced that when groups argue among themselves about fulfilling assignments (including grammar and compositional prowess), final products are better. For example, after viewing Richard Nixon’s famous – or infamous – “Checkers” speech in 1952, we will study Ted Kennedy’s apologia after Ms. Kopechne died in his company. Then, groups of speechwriters will create the TV speech that Bill Clinton should have given within 48 hours after Monica Lewinsky first became newsworthy. For affiliating with other students this semester, one speechwriting group must be all male and another only females; the rest can be any combination. Short papers yield one-third of students’ final grades.

Short papers (perhaps 3 typed double spaced pages) summarize and expand upon assigned readings, films, and group projects presented in class. The fifth short paper, exclusively an individual effort, will be the enthymeme assignment, which can be any length deemed necessary. A longer, individual final paper (7–8 typed pages) will report research about some topic suggested by the course (its focus must be developed in consultation with me and will constitute another one-third of your final grade; for some research paper topics, considering the scope of the endeavor, I may approve of a collaborative research paper). The course also has an individual “take home” final exam for the final one-third. Please understand that group projects require meetings with your peers outside of regular class periods. You also are required to view some films outside of class, whether in groups or individually.

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