Undergraduate Courses, Fall 2012

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Upper Division (3000–4000) Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

AML 3031

American Lit to 1865: "Shifty Selves”

Jodi Schorb

This upper division, reading-intensive course will introduce students to a range of early American narrative genres while analyzing the antebellum literary proliferation of sharpers, swindlers, counterfeiters, and confidence men and women. 

Founding father Benjamin Franklin, notorious counterfeiter Stephen Burroughs, cross-dressing sailor "Lucy Brewer": each was a “self-made man” who reinvented themselves by exploiting the fluidity of their respective eras. Whether a “cultural hero for Americans" (Lindberg), or an unsettling figure who could “dramatize not only the fluidity of identity but also the mercurial nature of flush-times life” (Lenz), the confidence man thrived on manipulating public belief and perception. For our course motto, we turn to Simon Suggs, the Southern anti-hero of Johnson J. Hooper’s fiction, who declares “It is good to be shifty in a new country”: the texts we’ll read in the class will explore the literary and cultural terrain of “shiftiness.” 

Course questions include: Why the prominence of literary “confidence men” in the early national and antebellum periods?  Given early America’s volatile economics, how do narratives of self-fashioning intersect with the language of credit, borrowing, speculation, and risk?  How do the necessities of the frontier, city, domestic sphere, and slave-holding south mobilize different plots of artifice and passing? 

Possible texts include: Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography (1793); Sketch of the Life of Stephen Burroughs (1809), Anon., "The Adventures of Louisa Baker/Lucy Brewer" (1815); Tabitha Tenney’s Female Quixotism (1801); Robert Montgomery Byrd’s Sheppard Lee (1836); Edgar Allen Poe, "Diddling Considered One of the Exact Sciences" (1850), Johnson Jones Hooper, Adventures of Captain Simon Suggs; Benjamin Phineus T. Barnum’s Life of P.T. Barnum (1854); Herman Melville’s The Confidence Man (1857);E.D.E.N. Southworth’s The Hidden Hand; Or, Capitola the Madcap (1859); William and Ellen Craft’s Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom (1860); Louisa May Alcott’s “Behind the Mask; or A Woman’s Power” (1866).  Requirements include quizzes, short analysis papers, two 6–8 page essays, and a willingness to engage creatively with texts that are often 300-plus pages.

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AML 3605

African American Literature I

Debra Walker King

African American writers from 1746 to the present have written in all genres, leaving none unchanged by the appropriation. It is a literature that not only intertextualizes elements of the vernacular tradition (spirituals, folktales and the blues) and its own immediate past, but it is a regenerative force of conscious construction and literary beauty within the history of American literature. The goal of this introductory survey course is to investigate the transformational power of black imagination and artistic genius. Students will gain an understanding of and appreciation for the creative dexterity and conventions of this literature. The period covered begins with Lucy Terry’s 1746 “Bars Fight” and ends with the Harlem Renaissance. Although chronology is obscured by a focus on genre, readings are arranged so that students can trace the development of various genres and various styles, themes, images, and structures across time and within individual author’s works. In this way, the course emphasizes the creative process, intertextuality, and literary history of African American writers.

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AML 3673

Asian American Studies

Malini Schueller

“Asian-American” is a highly contested, yet necessary category, born of racism, nationalism, and resistance. This course focuses on the ways in which different forms of racialization as well as histories of U.S. imperialism have informed the construction of Asian-American identities. We will examine Asian-American literary and cultural productions in relation to specific immigration acts, restrictions, exclusions, and laws as well as to racialized stereotypes such as model minorities. We will consider events such Japanese-American internment in relation to the politics of race and the Rodney King riots in relation to Asian-American immigration and the politics of race and class. We will also study how U.S. imperialism in Asia and the Asia Pacific – the Philippines, Vietnam, and Hawai’i – have produced, and continue to produce, different Asian-American cultures.

I’m not sure exactly which texts I’ll use but we’ll probably read Jade Snow Wong’s Fifth Chinese Daughter, Julie Otsaka’s When the Emperor Was Divine, Carlos Bulosan’s America is in the Heart, and R. Zamora Linmark’s Leche. Other texts (at least 6–7 more) will be decided at least a month before the beginning of class. In addition, we’ll engage with documentaries such as Sa-I-Gu and Bontoc Eulogy. There will be a coursepack of helpful historical, sociological, and critical readings.

Requirements: 2–3 papers, one oral presentation and either weekly responses/random quizzes.

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AML 4242

Madness, Medicine, & Social Dis-ease

Sarah Traphagen

This course will explore how nineteenth century American literature shaped and negotiated the relationship between the health of the individual and the health of society. We will read texts that comment on the rising white, elite male authority’s effort (and anxiety) to diagnose, prescribe, and organize social bodies in order to reinforce hegemonic claims concerning race, gender, class, labor, and sexuality. Therefore, we will engage with the century’s prevalent cultural, medical, and scientific debates. Along with this lens, we will also examine figures and themes that disrupt the carefully designed “stable” social apparatus: madwomen, nervous bodies, incest, adultery, figures with animalistic appetites, quack doctors, the overworked, enslavement, and war’s wounded.

Surveying the entire century, we will consider historical and political contexts as well as the goals and subjectivity of each author. Interrogating early “democratic” aims, we will begin with the nascent formation of an exclusionary American consciousness, and then move to the cataclysmic periods of slavery and the Civil War that exposed the ill health of the nation. Finally, we will assess the impact of these events on the (re)formation and (re)organization of social bodies/categories through the late nineteenth century literary and philosophical modes of realism and naturalism.

Overall, this course will introduce students to a wide array of texts that consider (among various topics): narrative representations of diverse psychological landscapes, the concept of disease/dis-ease, female authorship, imagined masculinity, the physician figure in literature, heredity and racial identity, war trauma, and the century’s emerging focus on the medical body.

Novels, short stories, poetry, medical texts, and selections of theoretical and scholarly works comprise the readings for this course.

Possible texts include:

This reading intensive course requires regular participation and thoughtful reflection. Possible assignments include quizzes, discussion leads, reading responses, and two major essays (6–8 pages).

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AML 4242

Strange Realities, Adequate Fictions: Postmodernist American Literature & Contemporary Poetics

Mauro Carassai

As Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote back in 1837, “Each age, it is found, must write its own books; or rather each generation for the next succeeding. The books of an older period will not fit this.” This class will put Emerson’s sentence to test for our modern times by investigating to what extent the various attempts to formalize some post-World War II American works as “postmodernist” literature can still help us in making sense of selected contemporary literary productions.

As literature that emphasizes fragmentation, paradox, intertextuality, and pastiche, 20th century postmodern American fiction and poetry is often used as a lens to look at the variety of writing practices that characterize contemporary America. However, as Kenneth Goldsmith observes in Against Expression: An Anthology of Conceptual Writing, “what has happened in the past fifteen years has forced writers to conceive of language in ways unthinkable just a short time ago.” In what ways, then, can contemporary creative writings be understood within the critical frame of postmodernism? What are the postmodern features of the set of expressive intentions and gestures lying at the root of literary productions in the 21st century? Since contemporary poetics often take the current condition of writing in a situation of technological emplacement as a central issue, we are going to keep the notion of techné (from its ancient meaning to contemporary ‘high tech’) as dominant in our analysis of textual production. In so doing, we will explore the relationship between some representative texts of contemporary American writing and the world we live in as it is shaped or reflected by theoretical discourses about American technological modernity.

Possible readings include Thomas Pynchon’s “The Crying of Lot 49”, Mark Danielewski’s “House of Leaves”, Octavia Butler’s “Kindred”, Jonathan Safran Foer’s “Tree of Codes”, Gary Shteyngart’s “Super Sad True Love Story”, Margaret Attwood’s “The Tent”, poetry by John Cage, Charles Harrison, Elisabeth S. Clark, and theoretical pieces by Ludwig Wittgenstein, Walter Benjamin, Jean Baudrillard, Linda Hutcheon, Brian McHale and others.

The course is reading-based and class sessions will typically include lectures and class discussions. Students are required to write a mid-term paper and a final paper.

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AML 4282

Queer Autobiography, Memoir, & Autobiographical Fiction

Kim Emery

This course will focus on autobiography, memoir, and autobiographical fiction by various self-identified LGBTQ writers of the latter 20th and early 21st centuries, with supplementary attention to  the self-positioning of LGBTQ subjects in documentary texts assembled by others. Because queer self-fashioning often occurs within hostile and/or uncomprehending environments, we will seek to contextualize our readings not only in relation to the literary tradition of life writing more generally and the body of critical thought on this genre, but also in relation to the theoretical and historical (medical, legal, religious, political, socio-cultural) frameworks of queer self-invention and queer representation.

To this end, we will read autobiography, memoir, and autobiographical fiction by such writers as Alison Bechdel, Jeanne Córdova, Howard Cruse, Samuel Delany, Terry Galloway, Audre Lorde, Michele Tea, Rita Mae Brown, Leslie Feinberg, Jim Stewart, and Justin Torres, along with shorter scholarly and theoretical pieces, case histories, medical and psychiatric texts, newspaper and magazine articles, and similar cultural artifacts. Students will also be required to view several films, likely including Paris Is Burning, The Aggressives, Tarnation, Southern Discomfort, and shorts by Sadie Benning.

Along with regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion and activities, several short quizzes, occasional brief reading responses, two 5–7 page papers, and a class presentation will be required.

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AML 4453

The University in American Literature and Culture

Kim Emery

From Thomas Jefferson to Tom Perotta, American writers have explored the meaning of higher education in and to US culture.  Their understandings of the University are inevitably caught up with ideas and ideals central to the American experience:  the dream of upward mobility, the democratic faith in public deliberation, the myth of meritocracy. Like the country itself, the American University is cross-cut by class, race, and gender. It represents different things to different people and serves different functions in different circumstances.  The University has been a space of conflict and contestation, of conversation and community, of cooperation and of competition. Since WWII, especially, it has been a target of commercialization and corporatization. The University has been a force for assimilation, a haven for dissent, an agent of repression, and a scene of protest.  It has offered the country both vision and violence. 

Drawing on works from diverse genres, this course will consider various ways in which higher education in general and the research university in particular have been conceived and experienced in the United States, post-WWII to the present. We will also talk with scholars, activists, and administrators involved in shaping this University’s present uses and possible futures.

Regular attendance and informed participation are expected; three exams, one class presentation, and five short essays are also required.

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AML 4453

The Pen & The Penitentiary

Jodi Schorb

This is a course for students interested in the history of early prisons and early prison literature in America. Our readings will be drawn from three primary areas: pamphlets and essays by 18th and 19th century reformers, non-fiction narratives penned by prisoners, and 19th and primarily early 20th century fiction in which the historical prison plays a thematic or structuring role.

Beginning in the 1780s, America joined a transatlantic debate about the value and promise of reformative incarceration. Philanthropists, physicians and tourists visited American penitentiaries and debated the value of capital punishment, the impact of solitary confinement, and the effectiveness of penitential reform. The result was the transformation of punishment and the invention of the modern prison.

After reading from this influential archival history, we will consider the way the new knowledge, debates, and architecture of the penitentiary shaped the development of nineteenth-century American fiction, in part through what Caleb Smith has named the “poetics of the penitentiary”— narratives of rebirth structured upon the convict’s civil death. Literature penned by prisoners also gained notoriety and influenced public debates on social justice; we will therefore read inmate-authored texts and consider their literary and cultural significance and the conditions that allowed inmate-authors to enter the public print sphere.

The course will blend guided discussion of readings with reading quizzes, archival work, oral presentations, short analysis papers, and two 6-8 page essays. In later weeks, students will conduct research on an inmate author of interest. Secondary readings will theorize and historicize the transformation of punishment and offer competing arguments about the purposes and consequences of mass incarceration. Together, the readings and coursework will help students link the development of the prison to the carceral imagination in American literature.

Primary texts include Benjamin Rush, "Inquiry into the Effects of Public Punishment"; Charles Dickens, from American Notes (1842); Edgar Allan Poe, “The Pit and the Pendulum” (1842); Henry David Thoreau, “Resistance to Civil Government” (1849); Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter (1850); Herman Melville, Bartleby the Scrivener: A Story of Wall-street (1853; 1856); J.H. Banka, State Prison Life By One Who Has Been There (1872); Jack London, The Star Rover (1915), and fiction, poetry, and essays by an array of 20th-century inmate authors (including Donald Lowrie, Robert Elliott Burns, Agnes Smedley, Chester Himes, George Jackson, Etheridge Knight, Norma Stafford, Angela Davis), plus extensive secondary reading.

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AML 4685

Race & Gender in US Latina/Chicano Contemporary Literature

Tace Hedrick

From the late 1960s through the 1970s, a Chicana/o and U.S. Latino/a “renaissance” of the arts flowered, especially in the West, Southwest and on the East Coast; now, the so-called Latin explosion in the United States has increased the market value of “Latino” authors and artists. A select few Chicano and Latina writers have been drawn into the mainstream of United States publishing: writers like Sandra Cisneros, Cristina García, and Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez are, if not household names, at least well-known on bestseller lists. In reading bestselling authors as well as less well-known artists, this course will examine the ways assumptions – esthetic, social, political, and market-driven – about ethnicity and race as well as gender have changed (and in some ways remained the same) in the last decade, 1998–2012.

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CRW 3310

Advanced Poetry Writing

Michael Hofmann

Course description not available at this time.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 14, 2011 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 3310

Advanced Poetry Writing

Brandon Kershner

Course description not available at this time.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 14, 2011 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 4905

Advanced Seminar in Fiction Writing

Mary Robison

Course description not available at this time.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 14, 2011 deadline.

linkManuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 4906

Advanced Seminar in Poetry Writing

William Logan

“Just as the civilization of the Kelts is revealed to us by their dolmens, and that of the Scandinavians by their mounds and kitchen-middens, so will the antiquaries of future times immediately recognise the spots inhabited in India by the English by the piles of soda-water bottles heaped up before the cantonments, and the dwellings of the Americans by their deposits of empty meat tins.”

–Edmond Baron de Mandat-Grancey, Cow-Boys and Colonels, 1887

Poetry must be about hells and heavens, hills and halls, hopscotch and hiphop, and empty meat tins.  We will be looking in language for the equivalent of things felt and seen.  You will seek this in the words used by other poets, and those you invent for yourself.  Be prepared to read until your eyes hurt, to write a dozen poems (one per week), and to find your poems criticized.  Each week the workshop will discuss your work and the work of your predecessors.

This is Florida’s most advanced workshop in poetry, for students who hope to become poets and possibly attend an MFA program–or those who have merely developed an obsessive and perverse interest in writing.  Students from this class have gone on to the University of Iowa, University of Virginia, Columbia University, University of Michigan, and other programs.  

Reading list:

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 14, 2011 deadline.

topManuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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ENC 3312

Advanced Argumentative Writing: Campaign Rhetorics

Laurie Gries

The U.S. presidential election always brings a season filled with heated arguments. From political debates to television commercials to campaign paraphernalia, U.S. citizens are bombarded with campaign rhetorics in print, oral, and visual forms. In response, everyday citizens in our participatory culture argue back in important, if not, entertaining ways. From blog posts, freelance articles, and op-eds, to satirical remixes and protest speeches, to political songs, poems and art, people during an election season argue in various genres to make their voices heard. This advanced argumentative writing course offers you the opportunity to join in the election season conversation as you work to improve your ability to write, research for, and polish arguments about current issues that matter to you.

By semester’s end, you will be expected to have generated an electronic portfolio of your writing, in which you showcase carefully crafted arguments in a variety of genres. To prepare you for this writing intensive experience, you will be introduced to rhetorical theories of argumentation, composition and visual design strategies, and productive revising practices. As you write for an audience beyond the classroom setting, you will also work on your writing style and workshop your writing both with peers and instructor. To facilitate this learning experience, meeting times will fluctuate between whole class settings, group meetings, and one-on-one conferences.

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ENC 3414

Hypermedia

Greg Ulmer

What happens to humanities education in a culture of images? The proposition to be tested in a semester-long project is that hypermedia (Internet) authoring explicitly supports creative thinking: there is a fortunate alignment in hypermedia relating the logic of creativity, the forms of popular culture, and the links-and-nodes features of networked technology. The non-traditional methodology of this course requires active engagement through practices such as inventive problem-solving and group collaboration in in-class presentations and an email listserv. The point of departure for the semester project is the observation made by cultural historians that a pattern of a few core images is found organizing the work of the most productive people across a wide range of disciplines. The historians note that the ingredients of the core image are in place by the time the individual leaves high school. Our project is to test the educational capacities of image thinking by exploring this pattern or “image of wide scope” in an experimental hypermedia self-portrait. The pedagogy for the course involves a hybrid of criticism, composition, and studio arts. The medium for the semester project is a blog (such as Wordpress), supplemented by basic photoshop and drawing programs. Extensive use will be made of online materials.

< http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/glue/hypermedia/description.shtml>

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ENG 3011

Art Theory: 1815-1900

Ed White

This course offers an introduction to art theory through the nineteenth century. Our readings will cover a range of topics from the modern theorization of the “genius” concept, utilitarian responses to art, the emergence of the aesthetic called “realism,” the impact of photography on art theory, and the precursors of modernism. We will be using Art in Theory, 1815-1900, edted by Harrison, Wood, and Gaiger. The course will be writing-intensive as well, with regular short papers on the readings. No knowledge of art history is assumed.

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ENG 3011

Art Theory: 1900-2000

Ed White

This course offers an introduction to art theory in the twentieth century. Our readings will cover a range of topics, with a focus on the rise and fall of various modernisms, and the emergence of postmodernity as a theoretical focus. More specifically, readings will cover formulations of primitivism, futurism, cubism, Dada, constructivism, socialist realism, existentialism, and situationalism; the emergence of the theory of kitsch; the avant-gardist theory of history in relation to the Cold War; the appearance of a literature-based “critical theory”; and theories of postmodernism. We will be using Art in Theory, 1900-2000, second edition, edited by Harrison and Wood. The course will be writing-intensive as well, with regular short papers on the readings. No knowledge of art history is assumed.

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ENG 3115

Introduction to Film Theory & Criticism

Scott Nygren

This course will introduce current theoretical contexts for engaging the contemporary media environment, and will consider the writing of theoretical texts and the making of new films as parallel activities. 

We will study world media through close visual analysis of individual films, stressing the historical and international diversity of cinematic approaches and styles. At the same time, we will study contemporary critical writing on film and its basis in the larger domain of cultural theory. Emphasis will be on such basic issues as viewer identification, ideology, and cultural context as articulated through discourses on national cinemas, gender, sexuality, phenomenology, trauma studies, and postcolonial and ethical methodologies. Our principle purpose will be to investigate the conjuncture of theoretical issues with an experience of specific film texts, and the function of these texts in the past and present workings of history, especially as this leads towards questions for future production and study. The working assumption here is that alphabetic writing and film production both constitute modes of inscription, and represent two ways of embodying the same cultural process.

Mastery of so many topics is neither possible nor expected. The goal is to understand the conditions and motives that led to the rethinking of media, and to initiate theoretical strategies in your own work. Major assignments include one 6–8 page paper, one 10–12 page paper, and a presentation on your final essay. Active participation in class discussion is required.

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ENG 3121

History of Film I

Barbara Mennel

The course provides an overview of the history of film from its origin to the coming of sound. We discuss the roots of cinema in variety shows and early inventions of cameras and projectors. Moving from short films to serials, from the “cinema of attractions” to the development of classic narrative cinema, we will cover the emergence of genres and styles in an comparative and contrastive international perspective. The course introduces key concepts in film studies, examples of early film theory, and the debate about film history. Topics include genres, such as the social melodrama and silent comedy, the emerging star system, vamps and vampires, experimental cinema, animation, advertising, and the politics of montage. The course relies on required weekly film screenings, scholarly readings, quizzes, and writing assignments that form building blocks for a final research paper.

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ENG 3122

History of Film II

Robert Ray

This course asks you to use the movies Casablanca and Breathless as memory theaters for storing and recalling (1) the events of the 1930s, especially the consolidation of the Hollywood studio system and the rise of German fascism; and (2) the course of post-War cinematic history, especially American film noir, Italian neorealism, and the French New Wave.

The course covers film history from 1930–1965. After beginning with two movies of German origin, Fritz Lang’s M and MGM’s Grand Hotel, the course’s first half will trace the parallel developments in Hollywood and Europe, using the biography and writing of Walter Benjamin as an allegory of popular culture’s appeal and Nazism’s danger. Part I ends with the Fall of Paris, both the historical event (which drove Benjamin further into a fatal exile) and its Hollywood representation (in Casablanca). Part II traces the two roads that diverge from that moment: the film noir of movies like The Big Sleep and the neorealist rejection of Hollywood Cinema. These two filmmaking practices, apparently so contradictory, converge in the French New Wave, whose most famous movie, Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless, explicitly invokes the image of Humphrey Bogart, the star of Casablanca.

Some students, especially non-majors, have complained about the course’s significant reading requirements. That reading provides the larger historical context for the cinema’s development. But if you don’t like to do reading and have daily quizzes on it, you might think about taking a different class.

Readings:

Assignments and Grading:

I. 60% of the final grade will result from two written projects:

II. 40% of the final grade will result from the following:

You are allowed one unexcused absence. Each additional absence will deduct four points from your final course grade.

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ENG 4110

Body Genres

Amy Ongiri

Course description not available at this time.

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ENG 4130

Black Body Praxis on Film

Amy Ongiri

This class will examine the current cultural and theoretical discourse relating to the production and consumption of the Black body on film. We will consider the politics of representation in relationship to questions of masculinity, violence, the Black female body as spectacle, the body in relationship to constructions of urbanity, and the Black body in a transnational visual economy. Films examined might include D. W. Griffiths’ Birth of a Nation, Steven Spielberg’s The Color Purple, Julie Dash’s Illusions and Daughters of the Dust, Fatima El Tayeb and Angelina Maccarone’s Everything Will Be Fine, Lee Daniels’ Precious, Ngozi Onwurah’s The Body Beautiful and Coffee Colored Children, Branwen Okpako’s Dirt Eater, Raoul Peck’s Profit and Nothing But and Lumumba, Daniel Peddles’ Aggressives and Stephanie Black’s Life and Debt. The course will address recent theoretical positions articulated in relationship to African American bodies in Film and Cultural Studies by scholars such as Jacqueline Bobo, Saidiya Hartman, Phillip Brian Harper, Hamid Naficy, Elizabeth Alexander, Yvonne D. Sims, Keith M. Harris, Wahneema Lubiano, Kimberle Williams Crenshaw and Paul Gilroy.

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ENG 4135

New German Cinema

Barbara Mennel

In 1962, a group of young filmmakers at the Oberhausen Film Festival in West Germany boldly declared: “The old cinema is dead! We believe in a new cinema!” Out of this movement to overcome the 1950s legacies of fascism emerged a wave of filmmaking that became internationally known as New German Cinema. Its filmmakers were indebted to the student movement and a vision of filmmaking and distribution based on the notion of the director as auteur. This course offers a survey of the film from this brief period of enormous output and creativity, including the films by Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, Alexander Kluge, Helke Sander, Helma Sanders-Brahms, Volker Schlöndorff, Margarethe von Trotta, and Wim Wenders. We will trace the influence of the women's movement on feminist aesthetics and situate the films' negotiations of fascism and terrorism in postwar West German history and politics. The course requirements include required weekly screenings, quizzes, one research paper, and additional writing assignments.

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ENG 4135

French Film Noir

Sylvie Blum

“In one sense the French invented film noir, and they did so because local condi­tions predisposed them to view Hollywood in certain ways” (James Naremore). The class will be entirely devoted to the study of French film noir, its sources in film history and literature.
The class is crosslisted with FRT 3520.

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ENG 4136

Rethinking Video Production

Scott Nygren

Course description not available at this time.

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ENG 4146

Curation as Production

Roger Beebe

One tends to imagine a fairly clean division between the act of making a film or video and the act of programming it (of putting on a show, a festival, a tour, etc.). However, in the experimental film world, not only do makers tend to wear many hats on the production side of things (as director, cinematographer, editor, composer, distributor, etc., etc. etc.) but they also tend to be much more frequently involved in programming as well. In fact, given the few venues and meager support for experimental film in the U.S. (and really everywhere), it is critical that those invested in making work also be involved in helping to create situations in which an audience might encounter it as well. In recent years many notable makers have also been known for their programming efforts; Matt McCormick, Ben Russell, Jackie Goss, and Miranda July all ran festivals, screening series, video or DVD labels, etc. At the same time, many young curators (some of them right out of school) have made a name for themselves based on their curatorial efforts alone, like Astria Suparak (currently of the Miller Gallery at Carnegie Mellon) and Thomas Beard (currently with Light Industry in New York and co-curator of film and video for the upcoming Whitney Biennial).

So, while this is a course in production, it considers curation as a creative act, as a kind of production in its own right. Students in the class will collectively be responsible for putting on a number of shows in various venues around Gainesville over the course of the semester with different small groups taking turns assuming primary roles. Possible shows include reprises of past Gainesville offerings such as Silent Films/Loud Music (with bands scoring silent 16mm prints), Experimental Karaoke (which comes in several different varieties), Cinema under the Stars (outdoor screenings in public places), Trash & Treasures (curated shows of educational/industrial films from our 16mm archive), and the Gong Show (like Trash & Treasures, only with the audience selecting the films from a master list and being able to stop the chosen film by hitting a gong). Any show ideas that you might be interested in initiating could also be added to this list. Additionally, students will be involved in the selection of films for the competitive program in next year’s FLEXfest (the Florida Experimental Film/Video Festival: see www.flexfest.org), which has become a major stop on the experimental film circuit over the last decade.

Alongside these curatorial efforts, we will also study the history of alternative programming from the relatively recent microcinema movement to the 1960s film societies and ciné clubs to the very earliest experiments in ambulatory cinema (e.g., Dziga Vertov’s film train).

Admission to the class is by application only. Interested students should contact the professor as soon as possible to receive an application for the course; the application process must be completed by Friday, March 23. Preference is given to English or IDS majors who have taken one or more of the core film studies classes (ENG 2300: Film Analysis, ENG 3115: Intro to Film Theory, ENG 3121: Film History I, and ENG 3122: Film History II).

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ENG 4905

Independent Study

Faculty Member of Choice

An Independent Study course may be taken for 1 to 3 credit hours, but will only count toward the fulfillment of the 10-course requirement for the English major if a student registers for 3 credit hours.

This course is for advanced students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The student must find a faculty member who is willing to supervise the semester-long study, and together, the two create a project. The student must meet with the professor at designated times, agreed upon in advance, and complete all assignments in a timely manner.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: X-tra Ordinary Americans

Stephanie Smith

Americans have long cherished the idea that the nation-state, and by extension the individual, was exceptional or extraordinary. “American exceptionalism,” as an idea, is often dated back to Alexis de Tocqueville, who wrote that the then-50-year-old United States held a special place among nations, because it was the first working representative democracy, but the term American exceptionalism did not fully emerge until after WW II, under which many academic American Studies programs organized; this term points to an ideology of empowerment and has often been used as a tool of imperialism or empire-building that colors various aspects of American culture, culture being understood as a key arena for the “the social construction of reality,” the process whereby illusory notions like “national character” or “America” have been posited and perpetuated. This course will re-examine the construction of the “exceptional American” in poetry and fiction, starting in the mid-19th century but extending to speculations about the ideology in the present moment. Particular attention will be paid in this class to those artists who questioned or challenged this ideology, insofar as they interrogated the limits of this exceptionalism, and tested the boundaries of what was, at any given time, American common-sense about America.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Apocalypse & Testimony

Anastasia Ulanowicz

Although it is conventionally associated with eschatology, the term “apocalypse” derives from the Greek word “apokalupsis,” meaning “to uncover” or “to reveal.” Indeed, early apocalyptic narratives, such as the Revelation of St. John the Divine, are characterized as much by their desire to unveil, or testify to, a particular formulation of truth as they are by their desire to project the obliteration of former material relations and philosophical world-views. The objective of this course, then, is to consider the testimonial function of contemporary narratives of apocalypse. To what do these narratives testify? Who delivers such testimony? What desires motivate this testimony? What is the relationship of such testimony to trauma? Is such testimony ultimately possible?

Although our discussion will begin with an analysis of key Biblical apocalypses (e.g., Daniel and Revelation), we will focus primarily on twentieth-century literary and filmic texts produced within the United States. Assigned texts will probably include the short stories of Flannery O’Connor, Elie Wiesel’s Night, Walker Percy’s The Second Coming, Tony Kushner’s Angels in America, Cormac McCarthy’s No Country for Old Men, and Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now. Special emphasis will be placed on the relationship between apocalyptic narratives of the contemporary religious right (e.g., Tim LaHaye and Jeremy Jenkin’s Left Behind series) and those of the secular left (e.g., Jonathan Schell’s The Fate of the Earth). As we discuss these texts, we will pay particularly close attention to how such narratives testify, as it were, to particular popular and political formations within the twentieth century United States.

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ENG 4940

Internship

Undergraduate Coordinator

The English Department at the University of Florida offers three* credit hours of internship to its majors who provide the following to the Undergraduate Coordinator for approval:

Once the Undergraduate Coordinator has approved the internship requested by the student, the department will register the student for the internship credits.

Upon completion of the internship:

*For two credit hours, the student would need to work 8 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 16 hours per week for Summer A or B.

*For one credit hour, the student would need to work 4 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 8 hours per week for Summer A or B.

Please note the following limitations on the English Internship:

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ENG 4953

Department Seminar: Blake, Newton, & Disney

Donald Ault

Course description not available at this time.

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ENG 4970

Honors Thesis Project

Faculty members (2) of Choice

Students must have have completed at least one semester of ENG 4936, Honors Seminar. Open to English Honors students.

The student must select two faculty members: one to direct the reading, research, and writing of a thesis on a topic of the student’s and director’s chosing, and another as the second reader. An abstract (100 to 200 words) and one copy of the thesis (30 to 50 pages) must be delivered to the CLAS Academic Advising Center on Fletcher Road at least 10 days before graduation.

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ENL 3122

Nineteenth-Century British Novel

Pamela Gilbert

This course samples key developments in the British novel through the nineteenth century. We will examine the novels within three contexts: historical, literary-historical, and critical. If you have not had English 2022, you should plan to familiarize yourself with the period: the Norton Anthology introduction to the period is a good place to start. Gilmour’s and Houghton’s books are also very useful and are on reserve in the library.

The Victorian period was the great age of the novel’s emergence as a dominant popular form within a newly extensive literary marketplace, and Victorian novelists were consummate entertainers driven to sell widely and well. They were also preoccupied with the condition of their own culture; to paraphrase Richard Altick, rarely is the Present so much present in literature as it is in the novel of this period. Victorian novelists considered it their duty and pleasure to criticize, praise and generally comment upon current issues, and they developed new forms and genres to accommodate their purposes. These issues represent the formative phases of social concerns which we have inherited and which still define us: for example, the role of mass media, the ethics of capitalism, gender roles, the responsibilities of liberal government, the welfare state, pollution, the role of nation in the global community, etc. We will read a range of representative genres and consider them not only in the light of the emergence of the novel as a dominant form, but as documents of a culture’s attempts to represent and work out these issues of contemporary importance – aesthetically and ethically – and consider the ways in which Victorian ideas resonate for us today.

This course provides upper-division credit in the major, and will be taught with that in mind; therefore, students will be expected to know how to do research in the field and to attempt the application of critical frameworks. Due to the nature of the material, there is a considerable amount of reading. Carefully consider your reading speed and the expectations of the other courses you are taking before committing to this course.

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ENL 3132

Twentieth-Century British Novel

Brandon Kershner

The course is a survey of the development of the twentieth-century “British” novel (including Ireland) through the present.  The first half of the course will stress the arrival of modernism in the novel and the particular influence of literary impressionism; the second will explore lesser-known novelists, especially women, who are often excluded from surveys.  We will also examine the question of postmodernism in the novel.

Requirements: include two short essays (roughly eight typed pages in length).  The subject of the first paper will be point of view in one of the authors we read before the midterm; the subject of the second will be open, but it must concern the work of one of the novelists we are reading after the midterm.  There will be a midterm and a final exam, both including objective and essay parts, but the objective part of the final will not be cumulative.  Papers and exams count equally toward your grade.  Depending upon the class's demonstrated preparedness, there may be occasional quizzes, each counting 1/4 of a paper grade.  An additional grade, between C and A, will reflect your class participation. Books may include Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (Bedford Books); Ford Madox Ford, The Good Soldier;  Katherine Mansfield, Selected Stories; James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man  (Bedford Books); Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway;  E. M. Forster, Howards End;  Elizabeth Bowen, The Death of the Heart ; Iris Murdoch, Under the Net;  Zadie Smith, White Teeth.

ENL 3210

Medieval English Literature

R. Allen Shoaf

In this course, we will read, in their entirety, Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Patience, and the Alliterative Morte Arthure. We will read selections, some substantial, from Julian of Norwich’s Revelations of Divine Love, The Book of Marjorie Kempe and Thomas Malory’s Morte d’Arthur.

In preparation for reading these medieval texts, we will spend the beginning of the term reading major Latin authors who are known to have been directly and powerfully influential on medieval English writers, including (but not necessarily limited to) Virgil, Ovid, St. Augustine, and Boethius.

Students will take one examination in class and write two short essays (5-7 pages), the first due at midterm and the second at the end of term. There will be no final examination. Extensive use will be made of resources available on the WWW, and students will be introduced early to a number of major sites containing texts and bibliographies.

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ENL 3241

British Romanticisms

Kadesh Minter

This course will focus on the multiple expressions of Romanticism’s many concerns—the individual, nature, reason, imagination, and sympathy. As we consider the equally important relationships between authors and genres, the issue of gender will reveal itself as one of the critical discussions of the period. We will examine a selection of poets from the early and late Romantic periods, including Dorothy and William Wordsworth, Samuel Coleridge, Anna Letitia Barbauld, and Charlotte Smith, along with P.B. Shelley, Lord Byron, John Keats, and Felicia Hemans. We will also consider the influence and expansion of women’s novels through the works of Emily Bronte and Jane Austen. Students will be expected to read texts closely, participate in class discussions, compose response blogs, and write two extended essays. Course reading and notes will be assessed through periodic quizzes and a final exam.

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ENL 4221

Donne to Milton

Peter L. Rudnytsky

This course will be primarily devoted to a close reading of the poetry of Donne, the greatest of the “metaphysical” writers, especially his Songs and Sonnets, and to the “minor” works of Milton, including Comus, “Lycidas,” Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. We will also consider representative works by Ben Jonson, the leading “cavalier” poet. Course requirements include a midterm, final, and one five-page term paper.

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ENL 4273

PostPunk Cultures: The British 80s

Marsha Bryant

This seminar will explore poetry, fiction, film, television, and music that emerged alongside major cultural shifts of the 1980s. It was a time of “Iron Lady” Margaret Thatcher, the new social identity “Black British,” and the New Wave. The emergent discipline of cultural studies assessed the social meanings of style, and Bloodaxe Books marketed “poetry with an edge.” We will work across artistic and popular media to map key cultural intersections of the British 80s. Assignments will include active discussion, reading quizzes, 2 papers, a panel presentation, and a creative response.

Reading List:

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ENL 4273

Violence & the Empire's End

Emily McCann

This course centers on representations of political violence as they pertain to struggles to reckon with the waning of British geopolitical clout. We will read, analyze, and write about texts ranging from 1916 to roughly 1991, or the Irish Easter Rising to the end of Margaret Thatcher’s term as prime minister. This course will focus on reading aesthetic and narrative experimentation throughout the century as a means of working through events in England’s turbulent century. Some guiding questions for the course include: How can – or did – a culture re-imagine their history in their attempts to reckon with its fall from global power? How do the means of representing and communicating those histories change as those culturally authorized to create new histories begin to include the formerly marginalized by gender, sexuality, race, and class? What role does violence – conceptual, material, and aesthetic – play in the authoring of these histories?

Fiction, poetry, and drama will be equally emphasized in this course. Our primary readings will be supplemented by criticism, critical theory, and history.

ENL 4333

Shakespeare

Peter Rudnytsky

This semester will focus on the sequence of Shakespeare’s major tragedies: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Timon of Athens, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus. The approach will be primarily psychoanalytic and feminist, with an emphasis on developing skills in close reading. Course requirements include a midterm, final, and one five-page term paper.

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LIT 3043

Theater, Metatheater, & Theatricality in Early Modern England

Kristen Denslow

This course will focus on a number of early modern plays that foreground theater and theatricality. By reading these plays, the course will address the materiality of the early modern stage, the process and particularities of early modern performance, and the broader questions that the early modern stage allows regarding identity, politics, and culture. The course will consider the following questions: How did the material circumstances of the early modern theater impact performance? How might those circumstances change our contemporary understanding of the plays? How does the theatricality of these plays complicate the suspension of disbelief? How do metatheatrical moments in the plays comment on the body or profession of the actor? In addition to these types of questions, the course will focus more broadly on early modern theater and its cultural, social, and political contexts.

Possible readings include:

• Thomas Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy
• John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi
• Francis Beaumont, The Knight of the Burning Pestle
• Thomas Middleton (?), The Revenger’s Tragedy
• Ben Jonson, Volpone
• Thomas Middleton and William Rowley, The Changeling
• Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus
• William Shakespeare, The Tempest

Course requirements include reading quizzes, two essays, and an in-class presentation.

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LIT 3043

Modern Drama: Learning by Doing

Sid Homan

The assumption in all my theatre courses is that the text of a play is not just what is written on the page but that text in performance, delivered by actors before an audience. This means the play’s text also includes gestures, movement, blocking (the stage picture), and sub-text (what the character is saying inwardly, beneath the lines delivered onstage, as well as the “history” for that character invented by the actor). In the theatre, we would further supplement this text with lighting, sound, set, costumes, props, and make-up. To be sure, one can approach a play in a thousand ways – as literature, as a repository for the thinking of an age, as the springboard for political or cultural issues. But, since I work both on campus and in the theatre as an actor and director, and since the theatre itself is a unique medium with its own aesthetic principles, I approach the plays, with my students, and as a fellow “student,” as something meant to be performed by an actor and ratified by an audience. In the class each student will have a scene partner with whom he or she stages several scenes each semester. Once performed, the class and I, as co-directors, “work” that scene with the two actors, trying out options, rehearsing it. The emphasis, therefore, is on learning by doing, and I judge student work by intent, what goes into the performance – not by finesse. If there is finesse, that is considered a bonus. Each actor also writes a short paper assessing his or her experience during rehearsal for a scene. Performances and the scene papers count equally.

In this course, we will thus consider Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, Embers, All That Fall, Play, Eh Joe, Not I, and Come and Go; Harold Pinter’s The Lover, Old Times, Betrayal, and No Man’s Land, Sam Shepard’s True West, Curse of the Starving Class, and Buried Child; and Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.

A word of comfort: whether you have acted before or not, experience in the theatre is not a factor in the class.  We use acting as a way of studying the text.  Have no fears on this issue!

If you have any questions or comments, please e-mail Professor Homan at< shakes@ufl.edu>.

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LIT 3173

Women in Modern Hebrew Fiction

Avarham Balaban

Israel was founded on expressed ideas of a complete equality between the sexes. Yet, until the last two decades of the twentieth century, Hebrew fiction was mainly a male domain, and women were rarely depicted as a full blown human being. In the last two decades a new wave of female writers started publishing their work, and the image of women has become much richer and diverse. The rationale of the course is to explore the different manners women are depicted in Hebrew fiction throughout the twentieth century. Special attention is given to the changes that occurred in the last two decades, with the appearance of a new wave of female writers.

The course starts with a close reading of stories by writers who established the new center of Hebrew literature in then-Palestine:  Dvora Baron and S.Y. Agnon.. Then we study some stories of the “Palmach generation” of the 1940s and the 1950s (Moshe Shamir, Aharon Megged, Yigal Mossinson).  A major part of the course is dedicated to the works of the “New Wave” writers of the early 1960s, Amos Oz, A.B. Yehoshua, Amalia Kahana-Carmon, and Aharon Appelfeld. The final part of the course deals with the new wave of female writers, who started publishing in the late 1980s.

In the second part of the semester students will present short papers on the books of De Beauvoir (The Second Sex), Gilbert and Gubar (The Madwoman in the Attic), Millet (Sexual Politics), and Showalter (A Literature of Their Own).

The discussion of female figures in the texts (women as the ‘other,’ as full-blown human being, as symbols, etc.) is done in the context of Israeli society:  i.e. a new society established on  expressed ideas of a  complete equality between the sexes; the burden of Jewish tradition which tends to marginalize the role of women and stresses their role as mothers; the effect of the political situation (society under constant siege).

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LIT 3400

Paratexts

Terry Harpold

This course concerns paratextuality as a basic condition of reading. First comprehensively inventoried by literary theorist Gérard Genette, paratexts are verbal and material elements of a text which, while apparently ancillary to its primary aspects, orient and situate our reception of the text’s meaning. These include elements “inside” the text such as tables of content, prefaces, chapter titles, footnotes, and indexes, as well as others “outside” the text, such as jacket art, reader endorsements, advertising, and reviews. In more material terms, every expressive aspect of the text-as-object, including its typographic attributes, page size and design, paper weight and color, etc., or (especially) any unusual aspect of binding and pagination, may signify paratextually. Many of these attributes of print carry over to reading in digital environments such as WWW pages and e-readers, whose interfaces reproduce (with varying degrees of caricature) paratextual apparatus of print, as well as introduce their own, distinctive apparatus. (Another way to describe paratexts might be as aspects of the “interface” of reading in any environment. Like user interfaces of our computing devices, paratexts are a principal space of our transactions with the information they enframe.)

We will read several long and short literary-theoretical and historical treatments of the varieties and importance of paratexts (including Genette’s landmark 1987 study, Paratexts: Thresholds of Interpretation), and survey changing conventions of paratextual expression, from early modern print texts through contemporary digital reading devices. Much of our discussions will be devoted to close readings and hands-on analysis of unusual and exemplary print and digital paratexts. We will also take two field trips to visit UF library special collections with particularly rich examples of historical paratexts (The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature and the Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica), and a “virtual” field trip to explore anomalies of Google Books that reveal the mutability of the paratext in the late age of print.

All graded written work for the course will be completed in a course wiki. Basic knowledge of WWW- and image–editing applications may be to students’ advantage for some assignments, but is not required. Written course requirements include two exams and individual and collaborative research projects based on the field trips.

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LIT 4188

Caribbean Modernity, Modernism, & Postmodernism

Leah Rosenberg

This course examines Caribbean literature written in English in the Victorian and Modernist periods, from the 1830s to the 1950s—and how contemporary writers portray the period of slavery and indentured labor. It emphasizes modernity because many Caribbean writers of the nineteenth century and early twentieth centuries were deeply concerned with representing their homelands as modern societies and with dispelling stereotypical accounts of the Caribbean as primitive, exotic, and immoral. It highlights modernism because although it is often overlooked, Caribbean writers made major contributions to British and U.S. modernist literature. Finally, the course addresses postmodernism because recent Caribbean writers have shown a particular interest representing slavery and in the use of postmodern aesthetics to do so. Between 1808 and 1950, Caribbean writers produced slave narratives, pirate novels, travel writing, historical romances, and provocative accounts of the inner city – among other genres. “Caribbean Modernity, Modernism, and Postmodernism” considers the formal techniques, historical context, and political significance of this wide range of genres. It explores how Caribbean writers appropriated, transformed, and debated British and European aesthetics and will explore writers’ engagement with political events and issues: the debate over slavery; indentured labor and the social status of indentured Chinese and Indian workers and their descendants; cultural nationalism, Pan Africanism, anti-imperialism and first Wave feminism. Readings will likely include: The History of Mary PrinceWonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole in Many Lands; Claude McKay. Home to Harlem; C.L.R. James. Minty Alley; Rhys, Jean. Voyage in the Dark; Cliff, Michelle Free Enterprise; and Espinet, Ramabai The Swinging Bridge.

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LIT 4192

Empire & Identity

Leah Rosenberg

“Have I given you the impression that the Antigua I grew up in revolved almost completely around England? Well, that was so. I met the world through England, and if the world wanted to meet me it would have to do so through England.”

– Jamaica Kincaid (A Small Place, 33)

Exile, Empire, and Nationalism have traditionally been viewed as the “ground zero” of Anglophone Caribbean literature. In the 1950s, V.S. Naipaul, George Lamming, Sam Selvon and many other writers immigrated to London where they attained international acclaim, establishing the West Indian literary tradition.

Their generation of writers sought simultaneously to dismantle Britain’s colonial influence and to build Caribbean national consciousness as Britain’s Caribbean colonies transitioned into independence. Having been thoroughly schooled in everything English from language and literature to music and food, newly-arrived writers expected to be embraced by the mother country. Instead, they found systematic racism and war rations. The literature that resulted from this experience has shaped not only Caribbean literary studies, but also British literature and cultural studies. Ultimately, two members of this generation would win the Nobel Prize for literature: Derek Walcott [1992] and V.S. Naipaul [2001].

This course offers a critical history of Caribbean writers abroad and at home from the 1950s to the present, exploring the canonical literature of the 1950s as well as often overlooked literature and issues, such as the influence of the United States on the Caribbean, Indo-Caribbean literature, women’s writing, queer sexuality, and the genre of science fiction. The class will pay particular attention to the relationship between nationalism and literature because 2012 is the fiftieth anniversary of independence in Jamaica and Trinidad. The reading will likely include: The Independence anthology of Jamaican literature, George Lamming’s The Emigrants; Sam Selvon Lonely Londoner and An Island is a World; Joyce Gladstone, Brown Face, Big Master; John Hearne’s Voices Under the Window; Roger Mais, Brother Man; Levy, Andrea. A Small Island; Merle Hodge, Crick Crack Monkey; Mootoo, Shani. Cereus Blooms at Night.

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LIT 4194

African Literature in English: Literatures of Crisis

Apollo Amoko

This course turns on a foundational question in literary studies: what is the relationship between the realm of art—aesthetics—and the politics of everyday life—the lebenwelt. In an attempt to answer this question, we will undertake a genealogy of the contemporary literatures of Africa. As such critics as V. Y. Mudimbe and Simon Gikandi have contended, modern African literature first emerged in the late nineteen fifties and early sixties as a discourse designed to liberate African subjects from the colonial order of things. Written in the context of triumphant or, at any rate optimistic, nationalism, this literature predominantly deployed the aesthetics of realism. In hindsight, this deployment does seems neither accidental or co-incidental. These, it would seem, were literatures of radical possibility and profound optimism. Diverse critics such as Fredric Jameson, Kwame Anthony Appiah and Benedict Anderson all argue that realism is the preeminent aesthetic mode of nationalism. Both the nation and the realist novel are narratives of linear progress across time. Anderson appears to suggest that the novel (along with the newspaper) was central to the possibility of imagining the modern nation. The aesthetic of the novel made it possible to think and narrate the nation in “homogeneous empty time.” To what extent are the founding texts of modern African literature causally linked to the discourses of African nationalism? If the first generation of modern African emerged in the context of triumphant anti-colonial nationalism, then, succeeding generations have been written in the wake of what has come to be known as the Africa crisis. From the late nineteen sixties onwards, the promise of postcolonial plentitude give way to pessimism and despair as everyday African life came increasingly to be characterized by abject poverty, horrific violence, endemic corruption, repressive governance, crumbling infrastructure, extreme deprivation and other forms of mass misery. From one perspective, the African postcolony has come to be defined by an interminable, if not terminal, crisis. What has the aesthetic dimension of this crisis been? To what extent have Afro-modernism, magical realism and other forms of anti-realism displaced realism in the realm of African art? To what extent can these non/anti-realist modes been seen as symptomatic of a continent in crisis? Is it possible to trace one to one correspondence, if not a causal relationship, between the dominant forms of African art and the politics of everyday African life? Beyond canonical realist writers such as Chinua Achebe, Flora Nwapa and the early Ngugi wa Thiong’o, we will study such contemporary writers as Ben Okri, Zakes Mda, Cyl Cheney Coker, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Tsitsi Dangrembga and the later Ngugi.

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LIT 4305

Comics & Animation

Donald Ault

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 4331

Children’s Literature

John Cech

Children’s literature has become, in recent years, one of the most dynamic areas of publishing and media production. Currently, one of the wealthiest people in the world is a writer of children’s books, and each year films drawn from stories for children or adolescents are among the biggest box office hits. There is even a television channel devoted to the entertainment of babies. Children’s literature has, of course, been with us from the beginning and is the oldest and first form of literature that we experience. This course is meant to take you on a journey through this essential part of our literature – its history, genres, major figures, and some of its more familiar and celebrated works.

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LIT 4333

Literature for the Adolescent

Anastasia Ulanowicz

In this course, we will account for major themes and trends in American “young adult” (or “YA”) literature. As we analyze each of the assigned texts, we will pay particularly close attention to the ways in which works of YA literature draw on culturally-constructed notions of adolescence to shape the adolescent characters within them – and how, in turn, they seek to draw in and interpellate the adolescents who read them. Additionally, we will address issues of class, race, gender, sexuality, national identity, and consumerism implicit within the assigned texts.

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LIT 4334

The Golden Age of Children's Literature

Emily Murphy

The “Golden Age” of children’s literature (1865 –1926) was a period of extraordinary productivity in children’s publishing. Some of the most beloved children’s books were written at this time, including Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland and A.A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh. In this course, our primary focus will be the golden age tradition in the United States. As we read the children’s books from this period, we will discuss emerging ideas about childhood and the way these ideas changed over the years. This will involve comparing books from the first golden age to what is commonly referred to as the “second Golden Age” of children’s literature (1950s –1970s). Course readings will also be supplemented with excerpts from children’s literature scholarship (e.g., Caroline Steedman’s Strange Dislocations, Marah Gubar’s Artful Dodgers, and Julia Mickenberg’s Learning from the Left).

Some possible texts include:

LIT 4483

Public Culture, Writing, and (Viral) Circulation

Laurie Gries

This course explores how visual and digital artifacts emerge, transform, and circulate in what Henry Jenkins calls a participatory culture and Lawrence Lessig calls a free culture.

Throughout the first part of the course, you will be introduced to theories of circulation, participation, and the public sphere as well as research methods for studying (viral) circulation. You will investigate how different artifacts circulate on local, national, and transnational scales; transform in genre, media, and location; and shape diverse consequences. Such artifacts might include the now iconic Obama Hope image created by Shepard Fairey, the infamous photographs from Abu Ghraib, and the ever-remixing Pepper-Spray meme. In studying how such things go viral, we will explore how social networking sites such as YouTube, Flickr, Facebook, Twitter and other digital technologies accelerate the circulation and transformation of various artifacts.

In addition to learning rhetorical design strategies for production, you will also explore how guerrilla-marketing strategies unleashed in digital and physical settings can be successfully employed to generate publics and counterpublics. As you begin to think about putting your own artifacts into circulation, we will consider contemporary debates over intellectual property, copyright, and fair use as well as temporary solutions such as Creative Commons, which has been developed to maximize the access to and sharing of remixed and reused creative works. Putting this knowledge into practice, you will work collaboratively with peers to produce your own media campaign and attempt to make it go “viral” on the UF campus in order to generate a public.

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LIT 4930

Black Englishes

James Essegbey

Unlike Danish which is the language spoken by the Danes or Japanese which is the language the Japanese, English is not just a language of the English, even if that is where it originates. Today, the language has spread across the globe and has been appropriated by regions such that we can talk of Australian English, Nigerian English, etc. While most of the varieties of English can be understood for the most part by every English speaker, there are restructured varieties such as Sranan spoken in Surinam that are more difficult to follow. In fact, these have developed into different languages. The aim of this course is to take students on a language journey across the globe to look at the Englishes spoken by blacks in Africa and the Americas. In addition to learning about the structure and sociohistory of these languages, students will watch movies and/or listen to audio clips in these varieties. They will learn concepts like ‘dialect’, ‘pidgin’ and ‘creole’ which they will use to appraise the languages. Of particular interest to us will be the debate as to whether African American Vernacular English is a creole or not. Students will also interact with some speakers of the different varieties of black English.

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LIT 4930

Religious Conversion & the Nineteenth-Century

John Wiehl

This course will focus on the practice of religious conversion in nineteenth-century Europe. “Conversion” will be broadly defined and so our investigations will be multiple. We shall consider conversions from one Christian religion to another (such as Newman's conversion from Anglicanism to Catholicism), from a non-Western religion to Christianity (the focus of missionary's work) and in reverse, from Christianity to atheism and in reverse, from Judaism to Christianity and in reverse, etc. Myriad reasons for conversion will be explored: political conversions, both coerced and persuaded; internal illuminations or convictions; personal or kinship concerns such as marriage or adoption. The practice of conversion in nineteenth-century Europe was also thoroughly imbricated in other cultural issues of modernity; therefore questions regarding gender, nation, and race will necessarily require investigation as well as topics like sexual orientation, embodiment, and disability.

This course will focus on European literature specifically, and we will look primarily at works of fiction, supplemented by philosophical texts, nonfictional works, and life writing. Our methodology will therefore be mostly that of literary scholars and we shall address literary topics fully while also investigating conversion as a topic of social and cultural history. This course requires a great deal of reading. Please be sure that you have the ability and time to complete this amount of reading before signing up for the course.

Texts include:

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LIT 4930

Variable Topics

Sidney Homan

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 4930

Grimm's Fairy Tales

John Cech

Drawing on a wide range of materials, from early editions in the Baldwin Collection of historical children’s literature to contemporary media, this seminar will examine the continuing importance of Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm’s famous collection of fairy tales, The Household Tales (1812). The two hundreth anniversary of the first printing of these stories next year provides us with the perfect occasion to look back at these stories, many of which have become key tropes in our “cultural literacy” and important features on the landscape of the imagination. It is important to ask why these stories – like “Little Red Riding Hood,” “Hansel and Grethel,” “Snow White,” “Rapunzel,” and many others – have remained essential reading, not only for children but also for their parents and other caregivers. What are the spells that the tales continue to weave for adult audience? The seminar will seek to address these questions as it explores the cultural and psychological dynamics of the tales, along with the controversies surrounding them, as they have been told, retold, and reimagined – in print, film, music, theater, and graphic arts – over the past two centuries.

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SPC 3605

Speechwriting

Ron Carpenter

Speechwriting is an advanced composition course. In this course, students acquire stylistic prowess by which their sentences have increased potential to be remembered and quoted to achieve greater persuasiveness and resultant acclaim for you as one who uses the English language well in written discourse. The course is called Speechwriting because models to be imitated are in those most quotable sentences of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, John Kennedy, and Martin Luther King, Jr., for examples. Although you practice these stylistic skills while writing speeches, the acquired prowess is applicable in many future communication endeavors, as speakers or writers, regardless of profession. The textbook is Ronald H. Carpenter, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works.

This course is not about supporting arguments or organizing them into broader discourse. For those skills, other courses are more appropriate. Speechwriting is about the best words and their best orders – within sentences – to achieve optimal impress of your ideas upon readers or listeners. Your writing is perfected in drafts that you read aloud in class among peers (and for me), wherein you should acquire a sense of what to do to achieve the final product desired at the semester end. Thus, present drafts when due; listen carefully to other students’ drafts; participate in rewriting others’ sentences; and heed my commentary about all drafts. Do not assume that participation means simply presenting your drafts and listening only to commentary about them.

Your first speech will be written after we analyze and identify specific sources of style in Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and John Kennedy’s Inaugural Address. You will rewrite the Gettysburg Address, as Ted Sorensen would have helped John Kennedy write it. This assignment will improve your flexibility as a stylist. For your third speech, which praises a person for whom you have great love or admiration, you must write for an actual occasion when that person will hear or read your statement (you will earn many “points” from that person as well as other people). For the fourth speech praising an institution or ideal, you will write about something that you are likely to address in later life, perhaps as a professional person (I predict that years later you will take that text from your files and use it again for part – if not most – of a speech that you likely will give).  The second speech that you write in the course, exactly 100 words long, will be explained when the theory behind its persuasive function is explained in detail.

How a draft is presented, vocally and physically, has no bearing on your grade (for help with delivery skills other courses are appropriate; I may make suggestions about how to improve your platform presence, however. This important point merits restatement: Speechwriting is an advanced composition course, wherein you read drafts aloud as bases of discussion by which all students understand how and why some word choices (lexicon) and word arrangements (syntax) in sentences are better than others. For initial and final drafts, I require computer word processing. Revision is easier; spelling is accurate; word lengths of drafts are known.

From past experience, I know reasonably diligent students will achieve some of the stylistic skills taught in this course. Final grades are higher, however, as you (1) demonstrate refined prowess as competent stylists in final drafts submitted for a grade at the end of the semester, (2) understand course precepts derived from readings and lecture materials, as tested by three exams during the semester (the course has no final exam), and (3) produce final research papers about style as defined in this course (research paper options will be explained during a lecture relatively early in the semester and will require additional Web and library reading). In combination, initial drafts, exam answers wherein you demonstrate stylistic prowess, final polished drafts, group projects, and your research paper will total well over 6,000 words evaluated and graded by me for Gordon Rule credit (if you wish to make that claim).

Final grades are determined one–half by the average of your three exam scores and one–half by your final notebook with polished drafts of writing assignments and the research paper—all typed, double–spaced, and turned in at the time and date listed in the University Timetable as the course final exam period. Please know that although this is a writing course, I am impressed—for purposes of grades—by how much you know about style as defined in this course. Moreover, please appreciate that this composition course is unlike virtually all other persuasive writing courses at the University of Florida. The expertise and confidence in the precepts being taught are derived from your instructor’s own published research in six books, several book chapters, and numerous research journal articles (all of which informed my writing of your textbook).

In conclusion, teaching you to be eloquent stylists gives me great personal satisfaction. From my experience as a communications consultant for organizations outside the university (such as corporate executives, lawyers, civic leaders, hospital administrators, public relations professionals, CPAs, and officers attending the U.S. Naval War College), I know that skills acquired in this course will be useful for the rest of your life, no matter what your later profession is. The only prerequisite for the course is ability to write grammatical sentences that are spelled and punctuated correctly.

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SPC 4680

Rhetorical Criticism: Masterpieces of Rhetoric

Ron Carpenter

Our focus this semester is several “masterpieces of rhetoric.” Although many of these are political and presidential discourse generally, another specific focus is rhetoric to persuade Americans about armed conflict abroad. Thus, students will examine how some speakers, writers, and filmmakers appealed successfully to specific attitudes and actions that had profound influence upon the course of future events. The primary goal of the course is students’ refined sense of some rhetorical principles and techniques by which their own future discourse is persuasive.

Unlike previous semesters, the course now has no textbook because much of your course material now is on-line, including that through <http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speechbank.html>. Major class assignments are group projects. By the end of the third week of classes, you should be in a group with 4–5 other class members, who collaboratively will write discourse presented to the entire class for discussion and analyses, but these speeches, in and of them selves, will not be graded.  Instead, for grading purposes, students individually – or in concert with 2 or 3 other peers of their mutual choice – will write for grades short papers identifying and evaluating the rhetorical choices and techniques utilized in the group speeches as presented and discussed in class.  I will be naming, defining, and explaining the rhetorical factors that you likely will find yourself using well (or poorly).  A practical guideline for you to follow is this: if I write a term on the board, the concept should be understood by you, in your class notes, and thereby usable in your future.

I am convinced that when groups argue constructively among themselves about fulfilling assignments (including grammar and compositional prowess), final products are better. For example, after viewing Richard Nixon’s famous – or infamous – “Checkers” speech in 1952, we will study Ted Kennedy’s apologia after Ms. Kopechne died late one night in his company. Then, groups of student speechwriters will create the TV speech that Bill Clinton should have given within 48 hours after Monica Lewinsky first became newsworthy.  For affiliating with other students this semester, one speechwriting group must be all male and another only females; the rest can be any combination. Individuals’ short papers about group speeches yield one-third of students’ final grades.

Your individual short papers (perhaps 3 typed double spaced pages) summarize and expand upon assigned readings that are downloaded, films, and group projects presented in class. The fifth short paper, exclusively an individual effort, will be the enthymeme assignment, which can be any length deemed necessary to attain the desired objective. A longer, individual final paper (7–8 typed pages) will report your individual research about some topic suggested by the course (its focus must be developed in consultation with me so I can endorse in writing to you the appropriateness of your subject and research procedures (this paper will constitute another one-third of your final grade). For some research paper topics, considering the scope of the endeavor, I may approve a collaborative research paper). The course also has an individual “take home” final exam for the final one-third of your grade. Please understand that group projects require meetings with your peers outside of regular class periods. You also are required to view some films outside of class, whether in groups or individually.  As the course progresses this semester, I may amend the syllabus and its topics to take advantage of some current event as a topic for class consideration of rhetorical precepts and principles.

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