Undergraduate Courses, Fall 2013

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Upper Division (3000–4000) Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

AML 3605

African American Literature I

Debra Walker King

African American writers from 1746 to the present have written in all genres, leaving none unchanged by the appropriation. It is a literature that not only intertextualizes elements of the vernacular tradition (spirituals, folktales and the blues) and its own immediate past, but is a regenerative force of conscious construction and literary beauty within the history of American literature. The goal of this course is to investigate the transformational power of black imagination and artistic genius. Students will gain an understanding of and appreciation for the creative dexterity and conventions of this literature. The period covered begins with Lucy Terry’s 1746 “Bars Fight” and ends with the Harlem Renaissance. Our readings will focus not only on the literary forms of poetry, short story and the novel but will include political writings also. Although chronology is obscured by a focus on genre, assignments are arranged so that students can trace the development of various genres and various styles, themes, images, and structures across time and within individual author’s works. In this way, the course emphasizes the creative process, intertextuality, and literary history.

Class sessions include lectures but are discussion based primarily. Participation in discussion is an important part of your grade. You should listen carefully to others, ask questions of me and other students, and share your ideas. I expect all students to create an environment that encourages the participation of everyone. If you feel uncomfortable with discussion-based classes or feel you cannot contribute successfully, you should drop this course immediately.

Required texts:

Norton Anthology of African American Literature
• Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God

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AML 3607

African American Literature II

Amy Ongiri

This course will examine African American literature and culture in relationship to the tremendous social, political, and cultural change that characterized the post-war period. Special attention will be given to the ways in which African American social change movements such as Civil Rights, Black Power, and Black Feminism effect African American cultural production and African American aesthetic practices.

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AML 3673

Asian American & African American Interactions

Malini Schueller

Ever since the category Asian-American emerged as a politicized identity in the 1960s, the major pedagogical imperative has been to study the literature and culture of this group on its own in order to legitimize the field itself and to understand its common histories and tropes. African-American literature and culture, affected by legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and Civil Rights, has been thought to belong to a different trajectory. Yet from the very beginnings of major waves of Asian immigration, the two groups have been affected by and interacted with each other. This course seeks to understand the nature of these interactions. How do Asian-Americans see African-Americans and vice versa? What cultural characteristics and histories do they share? How have they been treated as minorities? What are their differences and how have they manifested themselves? What kinds of alliances have these groups created? How have both groups negotiated their Americanness? Ultimately, the course stresses the importance of interethnic studies.

Requirements: Regular attendance, oral presentation, two 8-page papers, responses to readings.

Possible Texts:

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AML 4213

Early American Life Writing

Jodi Schorb

Puritans and heretics, ministers and merchants, Quakers and witches, settlers and displaced American Indians, exemplary citizens and criminals, captives, prisoners, and slaves: how did the diverse populations of early America "compose" themselves and adapt their complex personal experiences into legible literary forms? This course will introduce students to a range of early American life writing composed between 1600 and 1830, including conversion narratives and spiritual autobiographies, captivity and slave narratives, travel narratives, and secular accounts of exemplary lives. Students will learn to analyze the form, function and development of life writing prior to the emergence of "autobiography" as a formal genre and to reflect on how authors translated the messiness and vicissitudes of their actual lives into print. Primary readings likely to include narratives by Thomas Sheppard, William Byrd, Elizabeth Ashbridge, Captain John Smith, Jonathan Edwards, Mary Rowlandson, Venture Smith, Ben Franklin, Mary Jemison, William Apess, Hector St. John de Crevecoeur, and others. Assignments include short analysis papers, group work, and a longer essay (10 pages) involving primary and secondary research.

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AML 4282

American Literature & Sexuality to 1900

Jodi Schorb

This course demonstrates how knowledge about early American sexuality and sexual history can enrich our understanding of earlier American literature.

The eighteenth century was preoccupied with how specific populations (middle class women, bachelors, the poor, slaves, white male citizens) “used” their sexuality; these concerns heightened during the antebellum era as debates around thrift, temperance, virtue, and miscegenation linked individual sexual behavior to the health and prosperity of the national body. By the end of the century, a new field of science, sexology, emerged, further consolidating the medical model of normative vs. deviant sexuality.

After a theoretical introduction that analyzes how sexual knowledge is created and shaped through literature, the course moves chronologically through literatures of the early republic, antebellum, and Victorian eras, exploring the ways that sexual discourse informs a diverse range of literary texts and genres, including sermons, seduction novels, travel narratives, detective fiction, slave narratives, and gothic fiction.

Discussion and secondary reading emphasize precise ways that American sexual history informs the structure, themes, and reception of our chosen texts. We’ll also consider why and when certain figures—including sodomites, coquettes, rakes, hermaphrodites, sexual “inverts”—appear at precise historical moments. We'll explore how various geographies--the city, the slave plantation, the faraway isle, the utopian commune-- become associated with specific sexual knowledges, possibilities, and threats. Throughout, we’ll be mindful of who circulated and read our texts and for what purposes, orthodox and other.

Likely readings include Samuel Danforth, The Cry of Sodom; Hannah Webster Foster’s The Coquette, Edgar Allan Poe’s “Mystery of Marie Roget,” Julia Ward Howe’s The Hermaphrodite, Herman Melville’s Typee, Charles Warren Stoddard’s South Sea Idyls; Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Blithedale Romance, Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the life of a Slave Girl, poetry by Walt Whitman, short stories by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, and Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw.

Secondary readings, often interdisciplinary in scope, will provide relevant social and literary history. Requirements include frequent short analyses, archival work, or reading response assignments, a final research paper, and group work. Regular attendance and participation are required.

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AML 4282

Queer Life/Writing

Kim Emery

This course explores autobiography, memoir, and autobiographical fiction produced by LGBTQ writers in the US, focusing on the post-Stonewall era. Because queer self-fashioning has, historically, most often occurred within hostile and/or uncomprehending environments, we will seek to contextualize our readings not only in relation to the larger literary tradition of life writing, but also in connection to the theoretical and historical frameworks of specifically queer self-invention and representation.

In addition to regular attendance and informed participation, two papers, a presentation, and occasional quizzes and homework will be required.

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AML 4311

Sylvia Plath & Her Cultural Afterlife

Marsha Bryant

By the time she was named one of Time magazine’s 100 Artists and Entertainers of the Century in 1998, Sylvia Plath had become literary culture’s ultimate commodity. From her photo-shoot in the Cambridge Varsity during her Fulbright years to Christine Jeff’s film Sylvia, Plath enters the cultural imagination as text and image, a person and a mythic figure. This course will explore Plath’s literary career and her cultural afterlife through close study of her poems, her novel, her journals, and her critical reception. We will also consider Plath in the context of the popular and literary magazines that first published her poetry, and her contemporary status in the media. Our texts will include Collected Poems, The Bell Jar, Ariel Restored, Unabridged Journals, a recent biography, a critical study, and the online journal Plath Profiles. If time permits, we will also study Ted Hughes’s Birthday Letters. Assignments will include two papers, a panel presentation, a parody, and engaged participation.

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AML 4453

The University in American Literature and Culture

Kim Emery

From Thomas Jefferson to Tom Perotta, American writers have explored the meaning of higher education in and to US culture.  Their understandings of the University are inevitably caught up with ideas and ideals central to the American experience:  the dream of upward mobility, the democratic faith in public deliberation, the myth of meritocracy. Like the country itself, the American University is cross-cut by class, race, and gender. It represents different things to different people and serves different functions in different circumstances.  The University has been a space of conflict and contestation, of conversation and community, of cooperation and of competition. Since WWII, especially, it has been a target of commercialization and corporatization. The University has been a force for assimilation, a haven for dissent, an agent of repression, and a scene of protest.  It has offered the country both vision and violence. 

Drawing on works from diverse genres, this course will consider various ways in which higher education in general and the research university in particular have been conceived and experienced in the United States, post-WWII to the present. We will also talk with scholars, activists, and administrators involved in shaping this University’s present uses and possible futures.

Course requirements include attendance, participation, a class presentation, two exams, and two papers.

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CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

Padgett Powell

This workshop course, the penultimate in our series of undergraduate workshops in fiction writing, seeks to help you write fiction better than you might already. Time is spent also on correct usage. We also seek to have you read better: to read for form, recognizing strength and weakness in your own and in others' writing, and recognizing various technical maneuvers in the published work we will read.

Students write three pieces of fiction, delivering a copy to each class member one week prior to group criticism. Students participate in that group criticism with wit and cogency and pertinence and deliver a letter of good criticism for each story read. This criticism has one object: to improve the work.

Assigned readings, from a book or two by a major writer, will also be discussed. This reading will be looked at usually in a somewhat technical manner; it is hoped that in the best of all possible worlds the reading will inspire a mimicry of correct form as you make the long trek unto your own vision and your own good writing.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 13, 2013 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

Mary Robison

This is a course in fiction writing at the intermediate level. Students must have some experience writing fiction. Prerequisite is the 2000 level fiction course, or permission by instructor. Throughout the semester, each student submits whole stories, although they may be works-in-progress or somewhat incomplete, or excerpts from a longer work. Genre fiction is inappropriate for this workshop. Although, presenting fiction that is experimental or non-traditional is encouraged. All write two or three short stories throughout the semester, copy them for the class, and present them on a schedule for analysis and discussion in a workshop setting. First responders are assigned for each week to initiate constructive critiques and encouragement.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 13, 2013 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry

Brandon Kershner

The course is essentially a workshop; that is, the emphasis will be upon improving your own creative work. The goal of the course is to improve your writing, in terms of the standards by which poetry published in nationally recognized journals is judged. In addition, you should emerge with better critical skills for improving both your own work and that of your classmates.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 13, 2013 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry

William Logan

“Poorly depicted clouds – which most people would not notice as wrong – are so disturbing to Dr. Thornes that they almost spoil visits to museums. For a meteorologist, the distraction is as great as the ordinary viewer being confronted by a figure with three arms. . . . [He added that] too many artists had painted [clouds] as they would a backcloth in a theatre.”

–Guardian (London), 9 August 2000

They told stories about [the country and western singer] Bill Monroe biting into his first bagel (“Dang! This is the worst doughnut I ever did eat!”).

–Burkhard Bilger, New Yorker, May 14, 2007

In this workshop we will attend to words as closely as a painter attends to paint—or to clouds. You will read a broad selection of modern poetry, from Emily Dickinson to Gjertrud Schnackenberg, and write a poem a week. Every week in addition to poems from students the workshop will consider for discussion poems from poets past and present. This is an advanced workshop in poetry, for students who have already taken at least one lower-division workshop (CRW 1301 or CRW 2300) and who want to press their understandings of poetic language even further.

Email or hard-copy submission of your manuscript is necessary for early registration. Please submit four poems to me at <wlogan@english.ufl.edu> in one attachment in .rtf format. Mention the workshops you have previously taken.

Required texts:

• A poetry anthology and three or four books of modern poems

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 13, 2013 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 4905

Advanced Seminar in Fiction Writing

Mary Robison

This is a course in fiction writing at the advanced level. Students must have extensive experience writing fiction. Prerequisites are 2000 and 3000 level fiction courses, or special permission by instructor. Throughout the semester, each student submits whole stories, although they may be works-in-progress or somewhat incomplete, or excerpts from a longer work. All write two or three short stories throughout the semester, copy them for the class, and present them on a schedule for analysis and discussion in a workshop setting. First responders are assigned for each week to initiate constructive critiques and encouragement. Genre fiction is inappropriate for this workshop. Although, presenting fiction that is experimental or non-traditional is encouraged.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 13, 2013 deadline.

linkManuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 4906

Advanced Seminar in Poetry Writing

William Logan

“Just as the civilization of the Kelts is revealed to us by their dolmens, and that of the Scandinavians by their mounds and kitchen-middens, so will the antiquaries of future times immediately recognise the spots inhabited in India by the English by the piles of soda-water bottles heaped up before the cantonments, and the dwellings of the Americans by their deposits of empty meat tins.”

–Edmond Baron de Mandat-Grancey, Cow-Boys and Colonels, 1887

Poetry must be about hells and heavens, hills and halls, hopscotch and hiphop, and empty meat tins.  We will be looking in language for the equivalent of things felt and seen.  You will seek this in the words used by other poets, and those you invent for yourself.  Be prepared to read until your eyes hurt, to write a dozen poems (one per week), and to find your poems criticized.  Each week the workshop will discuss your work and the work of your predecessors.

This is Florida’s most advanced workshop in poetry, for students who hope to become poets and possibly attend an MFA program–or those who have merely developed an obsessive and perverse interest in writing.  Students from this class have gone on to the University of Iowa, University of Virginia, Columbia University, University of Michigan, and other programs.  

Required texts:

• An anthology of modern poetry and a handbook on versification
• A selection of contemporary books of poetry

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the March 13, 2013 deadline.

topManuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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ENC 3312

Advanced Argumentative Writing

Raul Sanchez

This is an advanced composition course emphasizing argumentation and prose style. It will show you how to evaluate your own writing thoroughly and carefully, so that you can become a better writer in the long run.

You will write twelve documents (one per week after the first two weeks) of varying lengths. You may write on almost any topics you like.

The course is structured as follows:

For the first two weeks, we will meet as a group on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays to learn a set of terms with which to discuss argumentation in writing.

For the remaining 12 weeks, we will meet as a group on Mondays to learn terms with which to discuss prose style, and to discuss other issues related to your writing processes. On Wednesdays and Fridays, I will meet with you individually for 15 minutes, at a regularly scheduled time (on either Wednesday or Friday—not both). At these meetings, we will discuss your writing for the current week, we will evaluate your writing from the previous week, and we will look ahead to your writing for the following week.

I might ask you to post your weekly writings to Sakai for everyone in the class to read and remark.

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ENC 3312

Advanced Argumentative Writing

Laurie Gries

As evident in The New York Times, Good Magazine, and other on-line news sources, argument takes shape in a myriad of ways in today's digital arena. In the past ten years alone, new genres of argumentation have emerged as graphic designers, photographers, videographers, bloggers, and reporters employ new media to deliver their informed opinions. With such a wide array of genres to choose from, how do we determine the best genre in which to craft our arguments? Are some strategies of argumentation more effective to use in certain genres than others? If so, how do we learn which strategies to use in specific genres? Drawing on theories of contemporary genre studies, you will spend the first part of the semester analyzing the role argument plays in various genres at work in different online news sources and magazines. Using rhetorical analysis, you will also explore how argument is enacted differently in those genres.

During the rest of the semester, you will work on a team to create and design your own ezine with a targeted audience in mind. To contribute to the ezine, you will also craft arguments in different genres of most interest to you. Among others, genres of focus can include: feature articles, op-eds (print and video), infographics, photo essays, video, reviews, blogs, and cartoons. You will also be encouraged to invent new hybrid genres appropriate for your ezine and the arguments you wish to craft. 

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ENC 3414

Hypermedia

Greg Ulmer

What happens to humanities education in a culture of images? The proposition to be tested in a semester-long project is that hypermedia (Internet) authoring explicitly supports creative thinking: there is a fortunate alignment in hypermedia relating the logic of creativity, the forms of popular culture, and the links-and-nodes features of networked technology. The non-traditional methodology of this course requires active engagement through practices such as inventive problem-solving and group collaboration in in-class presentations and an email listserv. The point of departure for the semester project is the observation made by cultural historians that a pattern of a few core images is found organizing the work of the most productive people across a wide range of disciplines. The historians note that the ingredients of the core image are in place by the time the individual leaves high school. Our project is to test the educational capacities of image thinking by exploring this pattern or “image of wide scope” in an experimental hypermedia self-portrait. The pedagogy for the course involves a hybrid of criticism, composition, and studio arts. The medium for the semester project is a blog (such as Wordpress), supplemented by basic photoshop and drawing programs. Extensive use will be made of online materials.

< http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/glue/hypermedia/description.shtml>

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ENG 3011

What Hurts: The Historicist Theorists

Phillip Wegner

In one of the most significant works of literary theory published in the twentieth century, The Political Unconscious: Narrative as a Socially Symbolic Act (1981), the U.S. scholar Fredric Jameson opens his book by declaring that its “moral,” and even “the one absolute and we even say ‘transhistorical’ imperative of all dialectical thought” will be “Always historicize!” What Jameson means by this slogan—that is, what does it mean to historicize, or to think literature historically?—will be at the center of our concerns in this course, as we read works from the great historicist literary critics and theorists from the half century leading up to Jameson’s book and following in the last thirty years in its wake. (An additional note of interest: Jameson, the winner of the 2008 Holbergprisen, the equivalent for the humanities and social sciences of the Nobel Prize, will be speaking at UF this spring on March 23, and anyone interested in this course should consider attending his lecture). Historicist approaches are at the heart of a diverse range of traditions of literary theory, including Marxism, historical materialism, philology, New Historicism, feminism and queer theory, postcolonial criticism, and globalization studies, and we will touch on many of these in our readings this semester. As you shall discover, historicism remains a vital tradition of contemporary literary scholarship, both here at UF and beyond, and one our most important tools for thinking about and intervening in our increasingly global world. Although the final list is to be determined, readings will include many of the following: Georg Lukács, The Historical Novel (1937), Mikhail Bakhtin, Rabelais and His World (1940/1965), Erich Auerbach, Mimesis: the Representation of Reality in Western Literature (1946), Raymond Williams, The Country and the City (1973), Terry Eagleton, The Rape of Clarissa: Writing, Sexuality and Class Struggle in Samuel Richardson (1982), Fredric Jameson, The Political Unconscious: Narrative as a Socially Symbolic Act (1981), Catherine Gallagher and Stephen Greenblatt, Practicing New Historicism (2000), Eve Sedgwick, Epistemology of the Closet (1990), Edward Said, Culture and Imperialism (1993), Nancy Armstrong, How Novels Think: The Limits of Individualism 1719-1900 (2006), Franco Moretti, Distant Reading (2013). Requirements for the course will include keeping up with the readings, class attendance and vigorous participation in our discussions, reading journals, and two formal papers. While it will be a plus to have previously completed ENG 3010, The Theory and Practice of Modern Criticism, it is not a requirement for enrolling in the course.

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ENG 3115

Introduction to Film Theory & Criticism

Timothy Robinson

This course will introduce current theoretical contexts for engaging the contemporary media environment, and will consider the reading and writing of theoretical texts as parallel activities to the viewing and making of films.

We will study world media through close visual analysis of individual films, stressing the historical and international diversity of cinematic approaches and styles. At the same time, we will study contemporary critical writing on film and its basis in the larger domain of cultural theory. Emphasis will be on such basic issues as viewer identification, social formations and cultural context as articulated through a series of post-structural, postcolonial and postmodern methodologies. After introducing phenomenology and and structuralism as points of departure, the class will consider psychoanalysis, ideology, deconstruction, discourse, gender and race en route to postcolonial and postmodern approaches.

The principle purpose of the class will be to investigate theoretical issues through an experience of specific film texts, and the function of these texts in the past and present workings of history, especially as this leads towards questions for future production and study. The working assumption here is that alphabetic writing and film production both constitute modes of inscription, and represent two ways of embodying the same cultural process.

Mastery of so many topics is neither possible nor expected. The goal is to understand the conditions and motives that led to the rethinking of media, and to initiate theoretical strategies in your own work. Two papers of 8–10 pages each plus class discussion are required.

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ENG 3122

History of Film II

Robert Ray

This course asks you to use the movies Casablanca and Breathless as memory theaters for storing and recalling (1) the events of the 1930s, especially the consolidation of the Hollywood studio system and the rise of German fascism; and (2) the course of post-War cinematic history, especially American film noir, Italian neorealism, and the French New Wave.

The course covers film history from 1930–1965. After beginning with two movies of German origin, Fritz Lang’s M and MGM’s Grand Hotel, the course’s first half will trace the parallel developments in Hollywood and Europe, using the biography and writing of Walter Benjamin as an allegory of popular culture’s appeal and Nazism’s danger. Part I ends with the Fall of Paris, both the historical event (which drove Benjamin further into a fatal exile) and its Hollywood representation (in Casablanca). Part II traces the two roads that diverge from that moment: the film noir of movies like The Big Sleep and the neorealist rejection of Hollywood Cinema. These two filmmaking practices, apparently so contradictory, converge in the French New Wave, whose most famous movie, Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless, explicitly invokes the image of Humphrey Bogart, the star of Casablanca.

Some students, especially non-majors, have complained about the course’s significant reading requirements. That reading provides the larger historical context for the cinema’s development. But if you don’t like to do reading and have daily quizzes on it, you might think about taking a different class.

Required Readings:

Assignments and Grading:

I. 60% of the final grade will result from two written projects:

II. 40% of the final grade will result from the following:

You are allowed one unexcused absence. Each additional absence will deduct four points from your final course grade.

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ENG 4110

Montage

Maureen Turim

This course will explore montage and collage aesthetics in film. Ranging from the theories and montage films of the Russian directors, Sergei Eisenstein, Dziga Vertov, Vsevolod Pudovkin to digital montage work today, we will explore the aesthetics of combining images consecutively, in superimposition, and as fragments within a single frame. One might define montage as an art or technique of introducing contrast, conflict, dynamism, or extension into whatever linear flow of images and sound a film or video portends. Contrasting shots and/or linked shots are joined in sequence. In English the terminology is motion-picture editing or cutting, but even Hollywood developed the “montage sequence,” those dazzling bracket sequences that marked the passage of time, the rise to fame, or the fall from glory. We will explore montage in the Avant-garde (Maya Deren, Abby Child). We will also Photomontage and Collage in Art (Hannah Hoch, John Heartfield) to see how montage and collage, are linked in digital media. Heterogeneous, combinatory, and associative properties inherent in joining any two non-identical frames, and even “identical” frames will be explored in relationship to writing and various art forms. As Werner Nekes asked, “What goes on between the pictures?”

Course requirements include two papers of 7-8 pages each (35% and 35%), plus class discussion and miscellaneous assignments (30%). Participation in class discussion and on elearning is essential.

Possible Texts:

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ENG 4130

Introduction to Asian American Film& Video

Amy Ongiri

From Gangam Style to reoccurring characters on Lost and Grey’s Anatomy, images of Asians and Asian Americans currently have a larger representational presence in US visual media than ever before. This class will begin with a history of Asian and Asian-American representation in US visual culture in order to examine the way in which media representation, a history of stereotyping, racial mythology and material reality collide to create the image of Asian-Americans in contemporary film and video culture. We will look at work by Asian-American filmmakers including groundbreaking films like the documentary Who Killed Vincent Chin? and experimental films such as Robot Stories as well as attempts to make images of Asian-Americans commercially viable in mainstream film such as Better Luck Tomorrow and Double Happiness.

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ENG 4133

Queer Cinema

Barbara Mennel

This course introduces students to the intersection of film studies and queer theory. It traces the history of visual encoding of non-normative sexual desire in dominant genres, such as the activist documentary and the melodrama, and discusses key concepts, such as camp and trash. The course investigates points of contact between exploitation film and the avantgarde by discussing works by directors, such as Su Friedrich, John Waters, Andy Warhol, and Edward D. Wood. Based on the question whether the depiction of gay and lesbian desire has produced a distinct queer film aesthetic, we will investigate the paradox of socially imposed invisibility and the visibility inherent in the medium film. Because the course highlights marginal subjectivities and their cinematic expression, it includes films that can be experienced as strange and weird or traumatic and painful. Participants in this class need to be able to approach such films with an open mind that allows them to engage with the texts productively, scholarly, and theoretically.

“Queer Cinema” provides an overview of the history of gay and lesbian cinema with its key turning points and periods; it introduces students to the theoretical questions that queer cinema produces for film studies; and, it highlights the emergence of queer studies in relationship to film culture. Films might include Different from the Others (1919), Girls in Uniform (1931), Glen or Glenda (1953), Suddenly, Last Summer (1959), The Children's Hour (1961), Therese and Isabelle (1968), Desert Hearts (1985), Torch Song Trilogy (1986), Looking for Langston (1989), Paris is Burning (1990), Swoon (1992), The Watermelon Woman (1996), Ma Vie En Rose (1997) and XXY (2007). We will read queer theory and film studies by Judith Butler, Richard Dyer, Susan Sontag, and Patricia White, among others. The course will be reading and viewing-intensive. In addition, writing assignments throughout the semester serve as building blocks for a final research paper.

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ENG 4133

Nazis in Film

Eric Kligerman

Course description not available at this time.

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ENG 4135

Chinese Film & Media

Ying Xiao

Course description not available at this time.

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ENG 4135

European Cinema, European Identities

Sylvie Blum

Since World War II, European cinemas have struggled to maintain the prestige they had earlier acquired, and are now considered Hollywood’s rivals. Strengthened by the establishment of the European Union, many films are now destined for a larger “global” market and its national communities. The course emphasizes European cinemas’ distinct aesthetic qualities as an “art cinema” in which political and philosophical poetics are present to a degree not found in American cinema. The course examines the question of what constitutes “Europeanness” and in order to do so, we will analyze critical texts surrounding this notion. The class is cross-listed with FRT 4523, and is offered in English.

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ENG 4136

Hypervideo: Rethinking Video Production

Todd Jurgess

This course derives from a double convergence in contemporary media culture. On the one hand, cultural theory and innovative artistic practices regularly overlap and exchange techniques. On the other hand, computers and video have merged so that video imaging and computer interactivity intersect and have reconfigured the electronic field. Based on these convergences, the class will map the creative and conceptual possibilities of working in new contexts.

The course will not teach traditional documentary, experimental or narrative uses of video as such, but will reinvent these approaches in order to produce visually articulate and engaging video in a contemporary world context.

We will be shooting video on digital video cameras and processing footage with desktop computers, primarily through Final Cut Pro on Mac G5s. The implication of such high-quality but low-cost desktop equipment, for the purposes of this course, is to make current technology available on an individualized basis for innovation and research. Much of the semester will be spent developing stategies for effectively using this equipment, and your participation will form a significant part of the course.

PLEASE NOTE:
Since space in production courses is limited, I am asking prospective students to apply for the class in order to prioritize for those who are most qualified and most in need of the course at this time. Please contact me at <todd1726@ufl.edu>

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ENG 4905

Independent Study

Faculty Member of Choice

An Independent Study course may be taken for 1 to 3 credit hours, but will only count toward the fulfillment of the 10-course requirement for the English major if a student registers for 3 credit hours.

This course is for advanced students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The student must find a faculty member who is willing to supervise the semester-long study, and together, the two create a project. The student must meet with the professor at designated times, agreed upon in advance, and complete all assignments in a timely manner.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: History & Theory of Japanese Cinema

Maureen Turim

From samurai films to social dramas examining the family, from ghost stories to new wave political critiques, from comedies to legendary animation, the Japanese cinema is one of the world’s richest national cinemas. This course will look at works by major Japanese directors, such as Ozu, Mizoguchi, Kurosawa, Oshima, to explore the art and stylistic experimentation characterizing Japanese inventiveness in film. We will explore the relationship of film to Japanese history, theater, music, and philosophical traditions. Japanese empire and World War II, the atom bomb, and Japan’s role in global capitalism are among our historical concerns. We will explore the Japanese studio system and the pattern of distribution of Japanese cinema to the world. The role of gender and sexuality will also be investigated. We will end with a look at recent Japanese genre cinema and animation. Readings will include scholars and theorists of Japanese cinemaa, including Richie, Burch, Kirihara, Bordwell, Yoshimoto, Russell, Nygren, Andrew, Raine, and Turim, and much writing recently available in translation.

This is an honors seminar, so the level of participation in class discussion and the elearning discussions will be a major factor in class success.

Assignments and Grading:

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Electronic Poetry & Poetics

Terry Harpold

In this seminar, we will read closely and intensively from the emerging, vibrant canon of electronic poetry—poetry composed with and readable or performable only with computers and related programmable and/or network media. Our investigations will begin with the field’s “prehistoric” forms (Christopher Funkhouser’s evocative label) of the 1950s and 1960s (e.g., the work of Jackson Mac Low, Emmett Williams and others), up to the work of contemporary poets and artists working with varied digital interactive technologies and forms (e.g., Giselle Beiguelman, John Cayley, Angela Ferraiolo, Mary Flanagan, Loss Pequeño Glazier, Nick Montfort, Jim Rosenberg, Stephanie Strickland, and others). Our aim will not be to determine how—if—electronic poetry differs fundamentally from poetry in other media, so much as to (merely, materially, generatively) encounter and reflect on new conditions of poetic composition and expression in the digital field.

Graded course requirements include a take-home midterm exam, three critical readings and in-class presentations on e-poems we will read together, and two responses to other students’ readings. All writing for the course will take place in a collaborative wiki environment. Basic knowledge of WWW- and image-editing applications may be to students’ advantage for some assignments but is not required.

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ENG 4940

Internship

Undergraduate Coordinator

The English Department at the University of Florida offers three* credit hours of internship to its majors who provide the following to the Undergraduate Coordinator for approval:

Once the Undergraduate Coordinator has approved the internship requested by the student, the department will register the student for the internship credits.

Upon completion of the internship:

*For two credit hours, the student would need to work 8 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 16 hours per week for Summer A or B.

*For one credit hour, the student would need to work 4 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 8 hours per week for Summer A or B.

Please note the following limitations on the English Internship:

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ENG 4953

Department Seminar: Writing for Children

John Cech

This course offers an opportunity to explore a number of the familiar genres of writing for young people -- poetry, the picture book, realistic and fantasy fiction, biography, and non-fiction -- as well as more experimental and innovative forms, like moveable and artist’s books and the graphic novel. Readings will be drawn from key children's books and criticism and will make use of holdings in UF’s Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. The emphasis in the course will be on rigorous, weekly writing assignments and critiques. Participants will need to bring to the course an open, creative spirit, an energized work ethic, and a commitment to producing exceptional writing.

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ENG 4970

Honors Thesis Project

Faculty members (2) of Choice

Students must have have completed at least one semester of ENG 4936, Honors Seminar. Open to English Honors students.

The student must select two faculty members: one to direct the reading, research, and writing of a thesis on a topic of the student’s and director’s chosing, and another as the second reader. An abstract (100 to 200 words) and one copy of the thesis (30 to 50 pages) must be delivered to the CLAS Academic Advising Center on Fletcher Road at least 10 days before graduation.

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ENL 3122

Nineteenth-Century British Novel

Pamela Gilbert

This course samples key developments in the British novel through the nineteenth century. We will examine the novels within three contexts: historical, literary-historical, and critical. If you have not had English 2022, you should plan to familiarize yourself with the period: the Norton Anthology introduction to the period is a good place to start. Gilmour’s and Houghton’s books are also very useful and are on reserve in the library.

The Victorian period was the great age of the novel’s emergence as a dominant popular form within a newly extensive literary marketplace, and Victorian novelists were consummate entertainers driven to sell widely and well. They were also preoccupied with the condition of their own culture; to paraphrase Richard Altick, rarely is the Present so much present in literature as it is in the novel of this period. Victorian novelists considered it their duty and pleasure to criticize, praise and generally comment upon current issues, and they developed new forms and genres to accommodate their purposes. These issues represent the formative phases of social concerns which we have inherited and which still define us: for example, the role of mass media, the ethics of capitalism, gender roles, the responsibilities of liberal government, the welfare state, pollution, the role of nation in the global community, etc. We will read a range of representative genres and consider them not only in the light of the emergence of the novel as a dominant form, but as documents of a culture’s attempts to represent and work out these issues of contemporary importance – aesthetically and ethically – and consider the ways in which Victorian ideas resonate for us today.

This course provides upper-division credit in the major, and will be taught with that in mind; therefore, students will be expected to know how to do research in the field and to attempt the application of critical frameworks. Due to the nature of the material, there is a considerable amount of reading. Carefully consider your reading speed and the expectations of the other courses you are taking before committing to this course.

Possible texts:

• Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
• Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre
• Elizabeth Gaskell, North and South
• Charles Dickens, Bleak House
• M. E. Braddon, Lady Audley’s Secret
• George Eliot, Mill on the Floss
• H. Rider Haggard, She
• other critical readings to be provided

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ENL 3132

Twentieth-Century British Novel

Brandon Kershner

The course is a survey of the development of the twentieth-century “British” novel (including Ireland) through the present.  The first half of the course will stress the arrival of modernism in the novel and the particular influence of literary impressionism; the second will explore lesser-known novelists, especially women, who are often excluded from surveys.  We will also examine the question of postmodernism in the novel.

Requirements: include two short essays (roughly eight typed pages in length).  The subject of the first paper will be point of view in one of the authors we read before the midterm; the subject of the second will be open, but it must concern the work of one of the novelists we are reading after the midterm.  There will be a midterm and a final exam, both including objective and essay parts, but the objective part of the final will not be cumulative.  Papers and exams count equally toward your grade.  Depending upon the class's demonstrated preparedness, there may be occasional quizzes, each counting 1/4 of a paper grade.  An additional grade, between C and A, will reflect your class participation.

Books may include Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (Bedford Books); Ford Madox Ford, The Good Soldier;  Katherine Mansfield, Selected Stories; James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man  (Bedford Books); Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway;  E. M. Forster, Howards End;  Elizabeth Bowen, The Death of the Heart ; Iris Murdoch, Under the Net;  Zadie Smith, White Teeth.

ENL 3251

Victorian Literature

Chris Snodgrass

This course will attempt to define the world-views, beliefs, doubts, anxieties, and paradoxes of the Victorian Period through a survey of the poetry, fiction, drama, pictures, and critical theory of a few representative artists. We will be reading no novels—novels are dealt with in another course (ENL 3122); rather, the course is designed to introduce you to many of the other artistic forms—and broad intellectual history—of the Victorian Age, one of the most interesting and influential periods in Western history.

We will try to probe the assumptions which underlie the works of art we will be studying—the “why’s” implicit in the artists’ approaches to their themes as well as the themes themselves— including an investigation of related cultural issues such as religious and scientific faith, gender identities, the “Woman Question,” and fin-de-siècle Decadence. We will be studying both canonical (famous names) and little known (not yet famous but still very good) figures, among them Matthew Arnold, Thomas Carlyle, Robert Browning, various High Victorian and Pre-Raphaelite painters, Ernest Dowson, George Egerton [Mary Chavelita Dunne], Ella D’Arcy, Graham R. Tomson [Rosamund Marriott Watson], Aubrey Beardsley, and Oscar Wilde.

BASIS FOR FINAL GRADE: Your grade will be computed as follows: 55%: your average score on two different types (one interactive) of frequent short “Insights” papers—1 to 3 paragraphs of “insights,” “ideas,” or “themes” relating to the previous week’s assignments to the current week’s assignments; 10%: your degree of active class participation and general preparedness during each class session; and 35%: a comprehensive final exam. Optional: You will have the option of substituting either a 1000-2000 word detailed poem analysis or a 1500–3000 word analytical term paper in place of any assignment category or combination of categories, except for the final exam, up to 25% of your final grade.

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ENL 4221

John Donne

Peter L. Rudnytsky

This course will offer a close study of writings by John Donne, the most famous “metaphysical” poet and one of the greatest love poets, as well as preachers, in the English language. We will spend the most time on the Songs and Sonnets, but also take up an assortment of other poems, including the Anniversaries and Donne’s major religious poems. The prose works to be read include Biathanatos, Donne’s paradoxical defense of suicide, and Devotions upon Emergent Occasions, a meditation on his serious illness, as well as selected sermons. The course will consist almost entirely of line-by-line analysis of the texts, which are generally quite difficult, with attention to the use of metaphor, psychological, social, and theological issues, etc. Course requirements are a midterm, final, and one five-page paper. Regular attendance and active participation in class discussions are also expected.

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare: Tragedies

R. Allen Shoaf

This course will be devoted to the ten tragedies Shakespeare wrote in his career, with especial attention to three factors: his transformation of the genre (most especially in King Lear); the rhetorics he renewed (e.g., pun) or refined (e.g., synoeciosis; paradox) to articulate his tragic vision; and his response to the sacramentality of nature that enabled him to comprehend and mourn humans’ catastrophic denials and perversions of nature, sexual nature in particular, in consequence of which self-inflicted optionlessness must lead inevitably to the end of the human.

Mandatory attendance and two essays (5–7 pages in length), along with unannounced quizzes, will constitute evaluation of your performance in the course.

The one text for the course will be the Norton Shakespeare, 2nd edition, which I will order through the university’s stipulated portal.
The first meeting of the course will naturally involve sorting out the roll and establishing attendance, etc. In addition, I will spend all of the class time available after we finish that work introducing what we will be doing in the course (I will work the entire 150 minutes of the first class).

Please note that this is a senior-level course: it is designed for students about to finish their majors in English; it is not a writing course, nor is it a “survey.” It is a term-long engagement with some of the poetry of the greatest writer of English literature, and students should expect and plan to approach the course with a commensurate degree of seriousness and commitment. In particular, class participation is important to a course like this: I do not “lecture,” I argue (positions, cases, definitions, controversies, ideas, etc.), and I expect you to argue back.

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare: Comedies & Romances

Peter Rudnytsky

This course will be primarily devoted to Shakespeare’s final plays, including the four known as “romances”: Pericles, Cymbeline, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest, but also Henry VIII and The Two Noble Kinsmen. If time permits, we will read at least one earlier comedy, such as Twelfth Night. The emphasis will be on developing skills of close reading and on exploring the psychological issues posed by these works. Course requirements are a midterm, final, and one five-page paper. Regular attendance and active participation in class discussions are also expected.

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LIT 3031

Studies in Poetry

Chris Snodgrass

[Note: This is strongly recommended for anyone who might consider going to graduate school in English, as well as anyone who just wants to understand about “the poetic,” in many ways the foundation of all artistic feeling.]

If human history and modern psychology have taught us anything, it is that the poetic impulse—our need to visualize, to fictionalize, to play with different paradigms of reality—has always existed at the root of the human experience. This course will study in detail primarily lyric poetry, in order to understand the technical interrelationships between poetic structure and meaning and the varied and complex ways by which human “themes” and reactions emerge—in short, what poems mean and how they come to mean what they mean.

Prior training in studying and analyzing poetry is not required. If you do not know much about poetry now, this course will change that. By the end of the term you will learn: (1) a solid general knowledge of poetic devices, metrical forms, and other elements of poetics; and (2) the ability to do a meticulously detailed and discerning analysis of a poem, showing a clear understanding of how the specifics of language, form, and structure create meaning.

This course is not a course in how to write poetry. There are other courses and workshops for that. This course analyzes the themes and structures of poetry and the assumptions of some specific poems. You will surely learn in this course a great deal about the logic and mechanics of poetry (which might well help you to write poetry better). However, I believe it is even more important for you to learn sophisticated analytical skills that will transfer valuably to almost any subject matter—particularly, a precision in critical thinking and a sensitivity to the subtleties and nuances of language. I therefore intend that the texts in the course, however interesting they may be in themselves, will also serve as the raw material on which you can hone such skills.

BASIS FOR FINAL GRADE: (1) 50%: two papers (25% each): the first will be a detailed poem analysis; the second will be either another poem analysis, or a paper comparing the different assumptions of several authors who have written on a particular specific theme, or a poem written by you, along with an attached detailed commentary on the logic of your poem and what techniques you attempted to utilize in it. (2) 35%: your average score on intermittent “pop quizzes” and scheduled exams. (3) 15%: your degree of active class participation and general preparedness during each class session.

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LIT 3043

Modern Drama: Learning by Doing

Sid Homan

The assumption in all my theatre courses is that the text of a play is not just what is written on the page but that text in performance, delivered by actors before an audience. This means the play’s text also includes gestures, movement, blocking (the stage picture), and sub-text (what the character is saying inwardly, beneath the lines delivered onstage, as well as the “history” for that character invented by the actor). In the theatre, we would further supplement this text with lighting, sound, set, costumes, props, and make-up. To be sure, one can approach a play in a thousand ways – as literature, as a repository for the thinking of an age, as the springboard for political or cultural issues. But, since I work both on campus and in the theatre as an actor and director, and since the theatre itself is a unique medium with its own aesthetic principles, I approach the plays, with my students, and as a fellow “student,” as something meant to be performed by an actor and ratified by an audience. In the class each student will have a scene partner with whom he or she stages several scenes each semester. Once performed, the class and I, as co-directors, “work” that scene with the two actors, trying out options, rehearsing it. The emphasis, therefore, is on learning by doing, and I judge student work by intent, what goes into the performance – not by finesse. If there is finesse, that is considered a bonus. Each actor also writes a short paper assessing his or her experience during rehearsal for a scene. Performances and the scene papers count equally.

In this course, we will thus consider Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, Embers, All That Fall, Play, Eh Joe, Not I, and Come and Go; Harold Pinter’s The Lover, Old Times, Betrayal, and No Man’s Land, Sam Shepard’s True West, Curse of the Starving Class, and Buried Child; and Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.

A word of comfort: whether you have acted before or not, experience in the theatre is not a factor in the class.  We use acting as a way of studying the text.  Have no fears on this issue!

If you have any questions or comments, please e-mail Professor Homan at< shakes@ufl.edu>.

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LIT 4183

Introduction to Postcolonial Studies

Apollo Amoko

This course explores the relationship imagined between contemporary nationalist discourses and the narrative form of the realist novel. In Imagined Communities, a landmark study on the origins and spread of nationalism, Benedict Anderson appears to suggest that the novel (along with the newspaper) was central to the possibility of imagining the modern nation. The aesthetic of the novel made it possible to think and narrate the nation in “homogeneous empty time.” Further, Anderson seems to contend that the canonization of literary texts through the school system was instrumental for enabling the intelligentsia to “take the nation to the people.” From this perspective, it is not surprising that literature has historically conceived of its objects of study in fundamentally nationalist terms. In Cultural Capital, a landmark study on the logic of literary canon formation, John Guillory contends that the effect of nationalist legitimization cannot be understood as a property inherent in the aesthetic of the novel (or the newspaper), but rather, is the product of a certain context of reading, “a pedagogical imaginary.” Specific literary works, Guillory insists, must be seen as “the vector of ideological notions which do not inhere in the works themselves but in the context of their institutional presentation, or more simply, in the way in which they are taught.” He makes a firm distinction between pedagogical and national imaginaries, between school and national cultures. In his argument, school culture “does not unify the nation culturally so much as it projects out of a curriculum of artifact-based knowledge an imaginary cultural unity never actually coincident with the culture of the nation-state.” While for Anderson, the novel enables the emergence of national culture, for Guillory, the cultural institutions of the novel reflect a highly restrictive school culture. Which of these two theorists presents the more persuasive argument regarding the connection between nation and narration? We will attempt to answer this question by looking at a range of canonical texts from a variety of national and continental contexts.

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LIT 4183

Postcolonial Theory

Malini Schueller

This course introduces you to the field of postcolonial theory. By the beginning of the twentieth century, a few European powers had colonized 80% of Asia and Africa. Nationalist movements during the latter half of the century led to territorial, but not necessarily economic, cultural and intellectual decolonization. The continuing cultural, political, and economic effects of colonialism, as well as new forms of colonialism and imperialism sanctioned on the global South constitute the field of postcolonial studies. We will study the ways in which postcolonial theory has intersected with and impacted diverse areas of inquiry such as feminism, historiography, ethnography, politics, and literature. At the same time, this course will stress the importance of historicizing postcoloniality. The course will focus on the central concerns of postcolonial studies: the nature of colonial discourse, the articulation of revolutionary national consciousness, questions of subalternity and history, the relationship of postcolonial studies to gender studies, and the politics of contemporary colonialism. We will read the works of major revolutionaries and theorists and the debates and arguments about these works. The course will cover writings from and about the major parts of the world affected by imperialism: Europe, Asia, Africa, Central America, the Caribbean, the Middle East, and the U.S..

Possible Texts:

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LIT 4188

Emancipation to Nation: The Emergence of Caribbean Literature in English

Leah Rosenberg

This course examines West Indian literature written between emancipation from slavery the British Empire in 1834/1838 and the transition to independence in the 1950s and 1960s. This period saw not only the abolition of slavery, but also the introduction of indentured labor (largely from India and China) as well as the rise U.S. military and economic dominance in the Anglophone Caribbean which brought with it a large-scale migration of West Indians to mainland Latin America to work on the Panama Canal and on the United Fruit Company plantation. This was, of course, the period in which the majority of people in the West Indians gained political rights and nationalist consciousness emerged. National literature arose in close connection to the rise of political nationalism and therefore participated in the debates and tensions about the definition of national and regional cultures in the region. The goal of the course is to understand how and why Caribbean people began to write literature and the relationship of this literature to the enormous political, social, and economic transformation that occurred between emancipation and independence in the British West Indies. The course examines as well the wave of recent novels that depict the nineteenth and early twentieth century, to assess the significance of this history to contemporary writers, who represent contemporary experiences, such homophobic legislation, domestic violence, and high incarceration rates as elements of the complex legacy of slavery, indenture, and Empire.

The course offers an introduction to Victorian, modernist, and postmodern Anglophone Caribbean literature. It provides an interesting comparison to students of U.S. literature because the United States, like the Caribbean, is a multi-racial, post-slavery and post plantation society. It will be of interest to students of British literature because Anglophone Caribbean writers were particularly engaged with the British literary tradition as the British literary canon served an important role in colonialism.

Authors are likely to include: Michel Maxwell Philip, Stephen Cobham, Herbert de Lisser, Claude McKay, Jean Rhys, Seepersad Naipaul, Edgar Mittelholzer, Shani Mootoo, and Dionne Brand.

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LIT 4194

African Literature in English

Apollo Amoko

This course will explore the idea of Africa articulated in the founding fictions of modern African literature. What is the historical, political, social and cultural basis of this idea of Africa? Modern African literature first emerged as a discourse designed to liberate African subjects from colonialism. What ideas regarding African subjectivity on the one hand and the role of literature in political struggle on the other hand did the colonial context impose on African literature? What “Africanized” notions of race, ethnicity, nationality, gender and sexuality did these texts propound? How did these notions relate to each other? In short, we will trace how a politics of identity translated into a theory and practice of art. To what extent is the idea of Africa propounded by the founding fictions representative of the politics of everyday life in the vast and varied continent? Is any literature ever representative of the context that ostensibly produced it? To what extent does the idea of Africa affirmed by African writers depend on, even as it purports to refute, the colonial idea of Africa? In what ways, if any, is African literature different from the literatures of other continents? Does it make sense to classify literature according to the racial, continental, ethnic, national, gender, sexual and other identities of either authors or readers? We will attempt to answer these questions by looking at a range of canonical African novels. The writers to be studied will likely include such authors as Chiekh Hamidou Kane, Chinua Achebe, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Sembene Ousmane, Camara Laye, Wole Soyinka, Flora Nwapa, Mariama Ba, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Dambudzo Marechera and Tsitsi Dangarembga.

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LIT 4305

Comics & Animation

Donald Ault

This course will focus on a highly selective history and analysis of comic strips, comic books, and animated cartoons.  The course will emphasize U.S. productions, especially during the first half of the twentieth century, with special emphasis on path-breaking artists and studios, originary versions of comics characters and animation.  The course will address the different narrative possibilities and limitations available to artists producing comics and animation.

Text requirement: course pack from Xerographic Copy Center, 927 NW 13th St.

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LIT 4331

Children's Literature

Anastasia Ulanowicz

This course will provide an introduction to major works of American children’s literature written from 1868 to 2000. As we examine these texts, we will consider how and why (or even whether) they might be read specifically as children’s books – and how, moreover, their study might prompt us to evaluate the American literary canon in its various historical permutations.  Additionally, we will question the ways in which these texts represent race, class, gender, and – perhaps most significantly – national identity.  Of particular interest will be the question of how these texts use the figure of the child to support (or contest) notions of nationhood and citizenship.

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LIT 4333

Literature for the Adolescent

John Cech

This course is designed to provide you with a survey of some major figures, historical trends, and critical approaches to that relatively new field of literature that occupies the shifting, transitional ground between works for children and adults. We will look at a broad range of genres and styles intended for or chosen by the adolescent reader, beginning with some canonical “classics” from the mid-twentieth century, and ending with some innovative novels from our own literary present. Taken together, these works will raise many of the questions (psychological, social, philosophical) in our discussions that are asked by adolescents themselves about their own challenging, demanding, and often defining experiences. A principle interest of the course will be to examine the ways in which successive generations have “constructed their ideas of the adolescent through a variety of cultural forms, among them: literature, film, television, music, and, most recently, the internet.

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LIT 4483

Cultural Studies/Literary Studies

Susan Hegeman

This course will provide an introduction to the theory and practice of cultural studies, with an emphasis on its relationship to literary studies. Topics to be addressed: what is “culture,” and what is “literature”? What is the methodology of cultural studies? How do the methods of cultural studies inform the study of literature? How do methods of literary interpretation inform our interpretation of culture? This course should be of interest to students studying all types of literature, literary theory, and cultural studies. Readings will be largely critical and theoretical in nature; grades will be based on formal papers, short responses to readings, and participation.

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LIT 4930

Shipwreck

Richard Burt

“We were like men walled up in a roomy grave,” Joseph Conrad, Lord Jim (Oxford World Classics), p. 88. Shipwreck narratives and abandon ship narratives are surprisingly about burial, not of the dead, but of the living; that is, the survivors of shipwrecks fear being buried alive, possibly cremated, possibly eaten, but do not fear burial at sea (marination?). This fear of premature burial plays out in encrypted narratives as well, narratives that are often highly resistant to reading; sometimes, one does know whether to read by fathoming the depths or trust the surface. Journals, writing materials, lost manuscripts, coffins, tombs, and various kinds of crypts, are at the center of a disaster genre in which fear of drowning almost never plays a part. We will read a number of philosophical and literary texts (not in chronological order, by the way) that “cross the Atlantic,” so to speak, and that are culled from a variety of literary historical periods.  These readings include Hans Blumenberg, Shipwreck with Spectator: Paradigm of a Metaphor for Existence; Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe; Edgar Allen Poe, “A Premature Burial”; Jacques Derrida, Beast and the Sovereign Vol. 2; William Shakespeare, The Tempest; Edgar Allen Poe, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket; Mat Johnson, Pym; Jorge Luis Borges, “Book of Imaginary Beings”; Franz Kafka, “The Hunter Gracchus”; Herman Melville, Moby Dick; and Jack London, The Sea Wolf. Three short papers and written questions on each reading. For more information, go to http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/burt/shipwreck/

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LIT 4930

Variable Topics

Staff

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 4930

The Children's Classic

Kenneth Kidd

Classic is an overdetermined and elastic term. It tends toward seemingly contradictory things: timelessness and finitude, exceptionality and the commonplace, the remote and the familiar, the organic and the manufactured. Moreover, classic tends toward children’s literature as much as away from it. The notion of a children’s classic amplifies the contradictions of classic more broadly, especially to the degree that children’s literature has been devalued. The idea of the children’s classic has helped legitimize children’s literature and has thus proven useful; at the same time, classic continues to signify a traditional faith in aesthetics, and as such engenders skepticism alongside faith. J. M. Coetzee writes that “the interrogation of the classic, no matter how hostile, is part of the history of the classic, inevitable and even to be welcomed.”

This course attends to the making (even forging) of the children’s classic. We will begin with classic definitions of the classic: Sainte-Beueve, Matthew Arnold, T. S. Eliot, Frank Kermode. We will take up the classic in relation to popular and academic culture, reading on such subjects as book and publishing history, canonicity and “great books”, bestsellerdom, middlebrow culture, the public sphere, literary prizing, and anticensorship work. We’ll consider the classic as an object of fantasy and/or valuation: the good object, the bad object, the object that endures. We’ll experiment with three categories of Anglo-American children’s classics: 1) fairy tales and classic fantasy texts; 2) prize-winning children’s titles; and 3) cinematic adaptations/variants.

Students will write short response papers and several longer essays. Active and engaged participation will be vital to success in the course.

Possible Scholarship and Theory:

Possible Literary and Cinematic Texts:

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SPC 3605

Speechwriting

Ron Carpenter

Speechwriting is an advanced composition course. In this course, students acquire stylistic prowess by which their sentences have increased potential to be remembered and quoted to achieve greater persuasiveness and resultant acclaim for you as one who uses the English language well in written discourse. The course is called Speechwriting because models to be imitated are in those most quotable sentences of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, John Kennedy, and Martin Luther King, Jr., for examples. Although you practice these stylistic skills while writing speeches, the acquired prowess is applicable in many future communication endeavors, as speakers or writers, regardless of profession. The textbook is Ronald H. Carpenter, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works.

This course is not about supporting arguments or organizing them into broader discourse. For those skills, other courses are more appropriate. Speechwriting is about the best words and their best orders – within sentences – to achieve optimal impress of your ideas upon readers or listeners. Your writing is perfected in drafts that you read aloud in class among peers (and for me), wherein you should acquire a sense of what to do to achieve the final product desired at the semester end. Thus, present drafts when due; listen carefully to other students’ drafts; participate in rewriting others’ sentences; and heed my commentary about all drafts. Do not assume that participation means simply presenting your drafts and listening only to commentary about them.

Your first speech will be written after we analyze and identify specific sources of style in Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and John Kennedy’s Inaugural Address. You will rewrite the Gettysburg Address, as Ted Sorensen would have helped John Kennedy write it. This assignment will improve your flexibility as a stylist. For your third speech, which praises a person for whom you have great love or admiration, you must write for an actual occasion when that person will hear or read your statement (you will earn many “points” from that person as well as other people). For the fourth speech praising an institution or ideal, you will write about something that you are likely to address in later life, perhaps as a professional person (I predict that years later you will take that text from your files and use it again for part – if not most – of a speech that you likely will give).  The second speech that you write in the course, exactly 100 words long, will be explained when the theory behind its persuasive function is explained in detail.

How a draft is presented, vocally and physically, has no bearing on your grade (for help with delivery skills other courses are appropriate; I may make suggestions about how to improve your platform presence, however. This important point merits restatement: Speechwriting is an advanced composition course, wherein you read drafts aloud as bases of discussion by which all students understand how and why some word choices (lexicon) and word arrangements (syntax) in sentences are better than others. For initial and final drafts, I require computer word processing. Revision is easier; spelling is accurate; word lengths of drafts are known.

From past experience, I know reasonably diligent students will achieve some of the stylistic skills taught in this course. Final grades are higher, however, as you (1) demonstrate refined prowess as competent stylists in final drafts submitted for a grade at the end of the semester, (2) understand course precepts derived from readings and lecture materials, as tested by three exams during the semester (the course has no final exam), and (3) produce final research papers about style as defined in this course (research paper options will be explained during a lecture relatively early in the semester and will require additional Web and library reading). In combination, initial drafts, exam answers wherein you demonstrate stylistic prowess, final polished drafts, group projects, and your research paper will total well over 6,000 words evaluated and graded by me for Gordon Rule credit (if you wish to make that claim).

Final grades are determined one–half by the average of your three exam scores and one–half by your final notebook with polished drafts of writing assignments and the research paper—all typed, double–spaced, and turned in at the time and date listed in the University Timetable as the course final exam period. Please know that although this is a writing course, I am impressed—for purposes of grades—by how much you know about style as defined in this course. Moreover, please appreciate that this composition course is unlike virtually all other persuasive writing courses at the University of Florida. The expertise and confidence in the precepts being taught are derived from your instructor’s own published research in six books, several book chapters, and numerous research journal articles (all of which informed my writing of your textbook).

In conclusion, teaching you to be eloquent stylists gives me great personal satisfaction. From my experience as a communications consultant for organizations outside the university (such as corporate executives, lawyers, civic leaders, hospital administrators, public relations professionals, CPAs, and officers attending the U.S. Naval War College), I know that skills acquired in this course will be useful for the rest of your life, no matter what your later profession is. The only prerequisite for the course is ability to write grammatical sentences that are spelled and punctuated correctly.

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SPC 4680

Rhetorical Criticism: Masterpieces of Rhetoric

Ron Carpenter

Our focus this semester is several “masterpieces of rhetoric.” Although many of these are political and presidential discourse generally, another specific focus is rhetoric to persuade Americans about armed conflict abroad. Thus, students will examine how some speakers, writers, and filmmakers appealed successfully to specific attitudes and actions that had profound influence upon the course of future events. The primary goal of the course is students’ refined sense of some rhetorical principles and techniques by which their own future discourse is persuasive.

Unlike previous semesters, the course now has no textbook because much of your course material now is on-line, including that through <http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speechbank.html>. Major class assignments are group projects. By the end of the third week of classes, you should be in a group with 4–5 other class members, who collaboratively will write discourse presented to the entire class for discussion and analyses, but these speeches, in and of them selves, will not be graded.  Instead, for grading purposes, students individually – or in concert with 2 or 3 other peers of their mutual choice – will write for grades short papers identifying and evaluating the rhetorical choices and techniques utilized in the group speeches as presented and discussed in class.  I will be naming, defining, and explaining the rhetorical factors that you likely will find yourself using well (or poorly).  A practical guideline for you to follow is this: if I write a term on the board, the concept should be understood by you, in your class notes, and thereby usable in your future.

I am convinced that when groups argue constructively among themselves about fulfilling assignments (including grammar and compositional prowess), final products are better. For example, after viewing Richard Nixon’s famous – or infamous – “Checkers” speech in 1952, we will study Ted Kennedy’s apologia after Ms. Kopechne died late one night in his company. Then, groups of student speechwriters will create the TV speech that Bill Clinton should have given within 48 hours after Monica Lewinsky first became newsworthy.  For affiliating with other students this semester, one speechwriting group must be all male and another only females; the rest can be any combination. Individuals’ short papers about group speeches yield one-third of students’ final grades.

Your individual short papers (perhaps 3 typed double spaced pages) summarize and expand upon assigned readings that are downloaded, films, and group projects presented in class. The fifth short paper, exclusively an individual effort, will be the enthymeme assignment, which can be any length deemed necessary to attain the desired objective. A longer, individual final paper (7–8 typed pages) will report your individual research about some topic suggested by the course (its focus must be developed in consultation with me so I can endorse in writing to you the appropriateness of your subject and research procedures (this paper will constitute another one-third of your final grade). For some research paper topics, considering the scope of the endeavor, I may approve a collaborative research paper). The course also has an individual “take home” final exam for the final one-third of your grade. Please understand that group projects require meetings with your peers outside of regular class periods. You also are required to view some films outside of class, whether in groups or individually.  As the course progresses this semester, I may amend the syllabus and its topics to take advantage of some current event as a topic for class consideration of rhetorical precepts and principles.

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