Undergraduate Courses, Spring 2013

Times and locations of class meetings are subject to change. Consult the UF Schedule of Courses for official class times and locations and an explanation of the class period abbreviations.

Upper Division (3000–4000) Courses

Note: Only course descriptions are listed below. For a comprehensive summary of course numbers, sections, times and locations, titles, and instructors, see the following web page:

AML 3041

American Literature II: Citizenship and Selfhood

Sarah Hayes

In 1868, Congress passed the Fourteenth Amendment stating that, “All persons born or naturalized in the United States…are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.” While the amendment’s language appears all-inclusive, it is notable that many Americans did not gain the benefits of citizenship, such as the right to vote, until many decades later. This course will discuss the popular definitions and limitations of American citizenship in the advent of a newly united nation marked by the end of slavery, the containment of Native Americans on reservations, the increase of European immigration and the shifting roles of women. We will examine how America attempted to transform social “others” into “useful citizens” through the rise of institutions such as the boarding school, the modern prison and the factory. This course will also look at literature as a method of activism and explore how writers used literature to establish their own definitions and insert themselves into the national narrative. Through a study of literature ranging from reconstruction to post-modernism, this class will explore how terms of American citizenship are paradoxically static and ever-changing.

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AML 3607

Survey of African American Literature II

Amy Ongiri

This course will examine African American literature and culture in relationship to the tremendous social, political, and cultural change that characterized the post-war period. Special attention will be given to the ways in which African American social change movements such as Civil Rights, Black Power, and Black Feminism effect African American cultural production and African American aesthetic practices.

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AML 4170

Indian Captivity Narratives

Jodi Schorb

The “Indian captivity narrative” remains one of the most influential and mythic literary genres, central to representing the dynamics of cross-cultural contact and colonization, the role of the frontier in early American nation-formation, and hostile encounters with “Otherness.” While the genre teaches us much about cultural fear and stereotypes – particularly through its representation of American Indians – it can also illuminate the captive’s nuanced psychological response to loss, pain, and cultural adaptation. Ministers, missionaries, settlers, propagandists, editors, captive whites and Native writers – all have shaped the development and the reception of this heavily-mediated, controversial, diverse, and significant genre.

We begin with texts that helped shape the standard definition of the genre – mostly personal narratives by Euro-American frontier settlers (often women) who are captured by “Indians” and relate their trials of captivity, escape, and return, including Mary Rowlandson’s Narrative (1682), John Williams’s Redeemed Captive (1707), Cotton Mather’s Humiliations follow’d with Deliverances (1697), John Gyles’ Memoirs (1736), John Marrant’s Narrative (1785), Narrative of the Life of Mary Jemison (1824), Narrative of … Mrs. Mary Godfrey (1836) and others. After a sustained look at the cultural work and literary importance of the genre, we will explore the persistence of the genre in early national drama and fiction, including Susanna Rowson’s Slaves in Algiers (1793) and James Fenimore Cooper’s Last of the Mohicans (1826).

A sustained final unit inverts the genre, further unsettling the genre’s problematic association with Anglo-American subject formation. Reading fiction and nonfiction by or about “Captive Indians,” we will consider how diverse Native American authors invoke, adapt, and interrogate the captivity genre to disrupt narrative conventions and to give voice to their protagonists’ complex experiences. Texts likely to include Geronimo’s Story of His Life (1907), Zitkala Sa’s “School Days of an Indian Girl” (1900), Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony (1977), Janet Campbell Hale’s The Jailing of Cecelia Capture (1985), and Sherman Alexie’s Indian Killer (1996). Requirements include group work and presentations, short response papers, and two 6–8 page essays. Regular attendance, participation, and writing required.

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AML 4242

Modern American Poetry

Marsha Bryant

This course takes an in-depth look at poems by Robert Frost, Gertrude Stein, T.S. Eliot , Langston Hughes, Wallace Stevens, Gwendolyn Brooks, Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath, and Rita Dove. Besides considering their interplay of traditional vs. innovative forms, we will focus on the poetry’s relationships to the natural world, domesticity, visual culture, and the city. In addition, we will consider the public role of poetry in the U.S. Course assignments are two papers, a panel presentation, a parody, reading quizzes, and engaged participation in discussion. Our work together will sharpen your skills in literary analysis, as well as provide strategies for writing more clearly and effectively.

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AML 4242

Studies in Twenieth Century American Literature: The Problem of Pain

Jordan Youngblood

“God whispers to us in our pleasures, speaks in our conscience, but shouts in our pains: it is his megaphone to rouse a deaf world.”

C.S. Lewis, The Problem of Pain

Lewis’ famous exhortation in The Problem of Pain– a book written in the pursuit of discerning a method and reason for the existence of human suffering – points towards the immense significance of pain and trauma in American literature. What purpose does pain serve in molding and forming American identity? How is it avoided, controlled, delayed, or denied? What are we, as readers, “roused” from in experiencing the presence of pain in a text – and what do we awake into?

This course attempts to examine a landscape of pain over the 20th century in American literature, beginning with T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land evoking the Petronian Sybil who wants only “to die,” and concluding with the father and son in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road staring down a world that offers little else but suffering. Along the way we will consider legacies of pain through such means as race (Gloria Naylor’s Bailey’s Cafe), religion (Flannery O'Connor’s Wise Blood), sexuality (Leslie Feinberg’s Stone Butch Blues), travel abroad (Paul Bowles’ The Sheltering Sky), wealth and production (Kurt Vonnegut’s Player Piano), community violence (Louise Erdrich’s The Plague of Doves), and family (William Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying). These texts will be supplemented by various short critical pieces and selections of poetry from authors such as Adrienne Rich and James Wright. While the subject matter may often be on some level harrowing, the aim of the class is not to sink all participants into a deep depression. Rather, we hope to explore how pain not only destroys but builds, and the means by which it has crafted both the American literary tradition and the larger cultural vision of our nation.

Students will be required to write two papers (a midterm and a final), in addition to an in-class presentation and a selection of short reading quizzes. The course will also employ a wiki to foster further discussion of class themes and concepts outside of class. Participation at all levels of the course is expected.

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AML 4453

Empire & Gender: The U.S. Experience

Malini Schueller

Taking imperialism as central to the construction of the United States’ national imaginary, this course will raise a number of questions about the intersection of empire and gender. How is the language of empire gendered? How does gender structure metaphors such as the frontier? How are representations of colonized spaces and racial others invested with discourses of gender? How does the captivity narrative persist in the narrative of contemporary imperialism? How do imperialism and war rhetoric build up masculinity? We will focus on specific sites of U.S. imperialism such as Hawai’i, the Philippines, Vietnam and Iraq, and examine the literary and cultural texts that emerge from those sites. Although the specific focus of the course is on US imperialism, the discussions should help us in thinking broadly about the ways in which languages of empire and gender intersect.

Possible Texts:

Edward Said’s Orientalism
Herman Melville’s Typee
Lois Ann Yamanaka’s Blu’s Hanging
Jack Kerouac’s On the Road
Susanna Rowson’s Slaves in Algiers
Nora Okja Keller’s Fox Girl
There will be additional critical essays. Other texts will be decided later.

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CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

Jill Ciment

This course will be run in the “traditional” workshop fashion with occasional lectures on structure, metaphor, plot, etc. Writing exercises will be assigned at the beginning, but the primary emphasis is on self-generated work. Each student will be expected to write two short stories, as well as complete a final draft of each.

Optimally, students will turn in stories that they have taken as far as they can on their own. The workshop should be a venue to test the waters, to try new things, to present first drafts as well as polished works, but ONLY after the writer has struggled with it to the nth degree. The idea is for students to rigorously challenge themselves. Everyone not presenting work should take their jobs as critics and editors as seriously as they take their own writing.

Reading will be assigned.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 19, 2011 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 3110

Imaginative Writing: Fiction

David Leavitt

What is a short story? No genre has so consistently eluded definition. Stories can range from eighty pages (Thomas Mann’s “Death in Venice”) to a single sentence (Amy Hempel’s “Housewife”). The purpose of this seminar will be to explore the parameters of this seductive and evasive form, from the standpoint both of the practitioner and the reader.

The seminar will be built around the idea that writers learn by reading. Therefore you may find the reading load heavier than is typical for a fiction workshop. Each week you will be asked to read a selection of stories by an established writer, and to arrive in class prepared to discuss them cogently. This conversation will take up roughly a third of our allotted time; the other two-thirds will be devoted to discussion of your own work and occasional in-class exercises.

The requirement of the class, in terms of writing, is that you complete two stories, the first by midterm and the second by term’s end. (The second may be an outgrowth of the first.) It goes without saying that attendance is mandatory, and that failure to show up (along with failure to do the reading) will have an adverse effect on your final grade. Grading will be based on your informed participation in the seminar, the critical acuity you show when judging other students’ writing, and your willingness to work hard.

The reading many include stories by Anton Chekhov, Jorge Luis Borges, John Cheever, Flannery O'Connor, Grace Paley, Amy Hempel, Mary Robison, and Denis Johnson.

Final note: although flexibility is essential to any writing workshop, so is structure. The same can be said – and must be said – of the writing process.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 19, 2011 deadline.

Manuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry

William Logan

“Poorly depicted clouds – which most people would not notice as wrong – are so disturbing to Dr. Thornes that they almost spoil visits to museums. For a meteorologist, the distraction is as great as the ordinary viewer being confronted by a figure with three arms. . . . [He added that] too many artists had painted [clouds] as they would a backcloth in a theatre.”

Guardian (London), 9 August 2000

“They told stories about [the country and western singer] Bill Monroe biting into his first bagel (“Dang! This is the worst doughnut I ever did eat!”).”

–Burkhard Bilger, New Yorker, May 14, 2007

In this workshop we will attend to words as closely as a painter attends to paint – or to clouds. You will read a broad selection of modern poetry, from Emily Dickinson to Gjertrud Schnackenberg, and write a poem a week. Every week the workshop will consider for discussion poems from the past and poems from students. This is an advanced workshop in poetry, for students who have already taken at leats one lower-division workshop (CRW 1301 or CRW 2300) and want to press their understandings of poetic language even further. 

Email or hard-copy submission of your manuscript is necessary for early registration. I’m out of the country and cannot read hard copy. Please submit four poems to me at <wlogan@english.ufl.edu> in one attachment in .rtf format.  Mention the workshops you have previously taken.

Required reading (tentative):

Norton Anthology of Poetry: Shorter Edition
Derek Walcott, Collected Poems 1948-1984
Geoffrey Hill, Canaan
Sylvia Plath, Poems
Michael Hofmann, Selected Poems

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 19, 2011 deadline.

topManuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 3310

Imaginative Writing: Poetry

Sidney Wade

This is an advanced CRW course in which we will focus on the craft of writing poetry. The class will be held in the Florida Museum of Natural Sciences, and students will be asked to observe items in the collection and write poems about them, based on our close analyses of model poems from anthologies. Students will be responsible for leading one discussion in the course of the semester and will also be writing one poem a week.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 19, 2011 deadline.

topManuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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CRW 4906

Advanced Seminar in Poetry Writing

Michael Hofmann

This semester we will read the Collected Poems of Ted Hughes and the Collected Poems of Sylvia Plath. Not against each other, not even alongside each other, but simply as well as each other. I’m thinking perhaps one poem by each per class – that, in addition to the (t)rusty workshop format. Sparks will fly.

Submitting Manuscripts for Upper-Division Creative Writing Courses

To qualify for departmental registration for upper-division creative writing (CRW) courses, you must submit a manuscript to the instructor of the course you wish to take. Each manuscript you submit for each course to which you apply must be accompanied by a Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet, which is available from the link below or in TUR 4012-A. It tells us what you wish to do, and it will help us put you in a course when space is tight. It will allow us to put you in the course you prefer when we can. Please fill it in closely and completely.

For CRW 3310 or CRW 4906, submit four poems; for CRW 3110 or CRW 4905, submit one short story or excerpt from longer work (up to 20 pp.). For ENG 4133, submit a short (approx. 500 words) summary of the film script you want to write.

The Manuscript Submission Cover Sheet indicates whether individual instructors require you to submit hard copies of your manuscripts to their mailboxes in Turlington 4301 or via email.

All submissions must be received by the October 19, 2011 deadline.

linkManuscript Submission Guidelines & Cover Sheet

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ENC 3310

Advanced Exposition: Blog Writing

Laurie Gries

This course offers you the opportunity to work on your writing in relation to exposition and style. You will practice your expository writing by generating your own blog focused on a particular subject of interest to you. Among other options, you can choose to create a blog about film, health, popular culture, politics, music, fashion, travel, and lifestyle.

This course is writing intensive. As such, you will be expected to generate 10–12 blog posts in which you gain experience generating well-researched content, incorporating image and text, and organizing ideas to achieve various communication goals. You will work on your writing style at sentence and paragraph level, as you attempt to write clearly, cohesively, and coherently for a targeted public. Yet you will also work on developing an appropriate ethos for your blog and thus adapt your writing style to meet your own blogging goals.

To prepare you for this writing experience, we will engage with rhetorical and genre theories as well as theories about style. You should also expect to write and revise all semester long, working on specific aspects of your writing that both you and I think need most attention. You will receive extensive feedback on your writing from both peers and me. Your blog will serve as an online portfolio for final assessment.

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ENC 3312

Advanced Argumentative Writing

Caroline Stone

This is a course in advanced composition. This course focuses on the elements of analyzing and composing effective arguments. We will consider the principles of strong argumentative writing, from classical to contemporary rhetoric, and we will practice those principles extensively. Students will write, workshop, and revise five essays throughout the semester.

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ENG 3010

Theory & Practice of Modern Criticism

Arun Pokhrel

This course introduces the major intellectual traditions of the twentieth century critical theories and literary criticism, including structuralism, New Criticism, Marxism, feminism, deconstruction, postmodernism, postcolonialism, and eco-/environmental criticism. We will close-read and discuss these theories and criticisms on their own, and apply them to certain literary texts from different literary periods. The aim of this course is to enable you to understand what theory is and how it can be applied to literature, especially to see what insights and perspectives theory can offer into a familiar piece of work and to assess whether one particular theory rather than others seems more apt for a certain text. In this regard, we will identify the major characteristics of each theory by reading some of the most influential theoretical texts that have shaped each school of thought and by looking at some examples of theoretical applications. These theories and criticisms, though viewed primarily as a critical tool to interpret literature, are seen in an alliance with it, whose relationship with a text may be harmonious or tempestuous. Our major emphasis thus will be on the close examination of the interactions between theory, language, epistemology, gender, environment, literature, culture and power while analyzing works of different genres in their specific social, cultural, historical and ideological contexts. You will demonstrate your comprehension of the course by completing three major assignments: weekly textual analysis (30%), interpretation of and presentation on a theoretical article (20%), an application of theory to a literary text (40%), and participation (10%). Your final grade will be cumulative based on all of these assignments.

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ENG 4015

The Replacement Child

Peter Rudnytsky

The course will examine the phenomenon of the replacement child – literally, a child who is conceived to take the place of another – in a series of classic literary works: Hamlet, Wuthering Heights, Peter Pan, Tender Is the Night, Long Day’s Journey Into Night, and Maus. The approach will be psychoanalytic, but no previous theoretical background is required. Course requirements are a midterm, final, and one five-page paper.

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ENG 4110

Eurotrip: Road Movie, Narrative Journey & Cross-Cultural Traffic

Holly Raynard

Like its American predecessor, the European road film has typically served as a powerful vehicle for cultural criticism, personal introspection and transformation. Yet the European map – replete with national borders, linguistic differences and imposing barriers like the Berlin Wall – hardly evokes the “open road” of America’s mythical frontier, where a traveler can venture some 3000 miles without waiting for a train connection; consulting a foreign phrasebook; or obtaining passports, visas and police permission to travel. Migration, deportations, social inequity and laws against nomadism have further complicated the notion of European mobility even as globalizing forces seem to promise increased cross-cultural traffic. In sum, European travel narratives offer a new perspective on the journey as such and the cultural issues engaged by travelers. This course will explore Europe’s dynamic cultural terrain from the 1950s to the present as it maps the essential coordinates of European travel and the road genre as such.

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ENG 4110

Post-Classical Cinema

Roger Beebe

This course is a broad-ranging overview of many movements in cinema since the beginning of the 1960s. It can be seen as the third part in a three-part story (with the silent cinema – 1895 to 1930 or so, covered in ENG 3121: History of the Film 1 – as the first part and classical Hollywood – roughly 1930 to 1960, covered in ENG 3122: History of the Film 2 – as the second part). This course then will focus on a number of major historical moments in the evolution of the cinema in what is often termed the “post-classical” moment, from 1960 until the present day. Some part of the course will focus on the transformation of Hollywood in the wake of the Paramount Decision, which effectively put an end to the vertical integration of the studio system, but we will additionally spend a considerable amount of time considering moments that fall outside of this narrowly US-centered industrial history. Other critical moments are likely to include the French New Wave, New German Cinema, the rise of Third Cinema, movements in the avant garde (including structuralist film, the “underground” film, the microcinema movement, and culture jamming), changes in documentary form (cinema verité, Direct Cinema), the rise of independent film, etc. As we trace these different histories alongside the history of Hollywood, we will also attempt to articulate a theory of what it is that we are doing when we construct a historical narrative – i.e., what, in fact, “film history” actually is or is meant to be.

While there is no prerequisite for the course, a familiarity with the basic vocabulary of film analysis (tilt, pan, zoom, long take, long shot, etc.) is very important for the course.  Students who have not taken ENG 2300 (wherein learning these terms is the central focus) would do well to learn these by taking a long look at Yale’s Film Analysis website:  <http://classes.yale.edu/film-analysis/>.

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ENG 4110

Norse Myth &/on Film

Christopher Caes

The aim of this course is twofold. It utilizes film to introduce and explore Norse myth, while at the same time utilizing knowledge of the forms and practices of Norse myth to undertake archaeological readings of modern and contemporary cinema.
Firstly, then, it is an examination of screen adaptations of original texts of Norse mythology, as well as period films and films drawing on the culture of the Viking Age. We will screen films originating from both in and out of Hollywood and ranging in subject from comic-book style action-adventure to Scandinavian art-house works. We will also augment our viewing with close readings of primary texts in translation, investigations of material culture, and reconstructions of ritual practices. Methodologically, we will utilize film to develop a sense of Norse myth not as a single, coherent and unified tradition, but as a constantly evolving, flexible network of meanings and strategies for negotiating wealth, power, and identity and able thereby to respond creatively to distinct historical situations.

Secondly, this course seeks to identify and assess the functions of cinematic representations of Norse mythology within the cultures of modern and contemporary Europe and North America. In addition to films, selected material in other media – Romantic painting, Wagnerian opera, and contemporary Scandinavian metal music – will be discussed as well. This second component of the course seeks to answer the question:  what do Viking themes permit films to do, in other words, what areas of contemporary culture are mobilized and spoken of in films drawing on Norse material? Accordingly, the course is divided into five separate thematic units:  1) irony & masculine anxiety; 2) realism, history, and the politics of individualism; 3) sorcery, ecology, and gender; 4) cultures in contact; and 5) music, modernity, and national identity. Methodologically, we will seek not to establish any simple continuities between the mythology of the late Scandinavian Iron Age and contemporary First World cultures, but to identify the transformations which occur in structure, meaning, and form as older stories are adapted for the conceptualization, dramatization, and imagining of new global realities.

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ENG 4110

Films of the 60s

Maureen Turim

A decade will be explored in this class through many of its outstanding films from the US and abroad. We will explore the complexity of cultural forces at work in the wake of assassinations, the confrontation with racial segregation, the growth of consumerism and suburbia, the anti-war movement in the US and parallel economic developments and decolonialization in a global context. We will primarily examine films made in the US for one third of the course, including the emergence of the US avant-garde, then devote our study to films from France, Italy, Germany, and what was then known as Eastern Europe, as well as Japan and Brazil in which the art of filmmaking begins to explore new aesthetic directions. It is a decade characterized by various breaks with the traditions of studio filmmaking and the redefinition of studio production and financing itself. This course will be useful to a wide range of students – certainly both literature and film and media majors, but also students of sociology, history, psychology, theater and art history.
On time attendance and active participation in class discussion is essential. Students must attend all class screenings. Since discussions will critically evaluate readings and films, assigned texts must be read prior to scheduled meetings. Participation on the e-learning website will allow students to further engage with the readings and films, and is required. There will be two papers, 7–8 pages each; prospectuses and outlines of each will be turned in for approval before the final drafts of the papers. Your ability to speak and write clearly and effectively, as well as the strength of your theoretical and analytical argument, will be the basis for evaluating discussion and papers.

Some readings will be essays will be on ares. Books may include:

American Cinema of the 1960s, Barry K. Grant
Allegories of Cinema: American Film in the Sixties, David James
The Foreign Film Renaissance on American Screens, 1946-1973, Tino Balio
Making Waves: New Cinemas of the 1960s, Geoffrey Nowell-Smith

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ENG 4133

Silent Film Philology

Richard Burt

This class will examine restoring (digitally remastering) old soundtracks and composing new soundtracks to silent films as effects of the film archive, or what Derrida calls the anarachivity of the archive. We will begin with two recent films about silent cinema, The Artist and Hugo. From there we turn to DVDs and blu-rays of silent films with alternate sound tracks, including Phantom Carriage; The Man with a Movie Camera (KINO and BFI editions); Nosferatu (Eureka / KINO edition) ; Battleship Potemkin (KINO blu-ray); Murnau’s Faust (Eureka Masters of Cinema edition). Readings will include Jacques Derrida, Archive Fever; Paolo Cherchi Usai, Silent Cinema, an Introduction (British Film Institute); Paolo Cherchi Usai, Francis, David, Horwath, Alexander, Loebenstein, Michael, ed. Film Curatorship: Museums, Curatorship and the Moving Image; Paolo Cherchi Usai, The Death of Cinema: History, Cultural Memory, and the Digital Dark Age. We will also turn our attention at times to films that are “about” the transition from silent to sound cinema in 1929. Films may include Alfred Hitchcock (sound and silent versions) Blackmail; A Cottage on Dartmoor; Billy Wilder, Sunset Boulevard; Jean Renoir, Rules of the Game; Rene Clair, Le Million, A Nous la Liberte, and Under the Roofs of Paris, Charlie Chaplin, Modern Times; Fritz Lang, M; Jean-Luc Godard, Vivre sa Vie. We will also examine the use of silence in a number of sound films.

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ENG 4133

Drive

Richard Burt

This is a course about driving in theory. In conjunction with a number of films variously involving driving cars, we will read works by Sigmund Freud, Martin Heidegger, Jacques Lacan, and Jacques Derrida concerned with the way repetition complicates oppositions between the human and the machine, between the organic and the inorganic, oppositions we ordinarily take for granted. Films will include Drive, Taxi Driver, The Phantom Carriage, Wild Strawberries, Detour, Sunset Boulevard, Carnival of Souls, Vertigo, Transporter 2, Wages of Fear, Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift, Lost Highway, Premonition, Mulholland Drive, Final Destination, Final Destination 2, and Bonnie and Clyde. For more information, go to http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/burt/Drive/

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ENG 4133

Introduction to Screenwriting

Mary Robison

The class is an introduction to screenwriting, and a very thorough study of the screenplay’s many conventions and aspects. Put simply, you will learn the form in all its parts and develop (or refine) your abilities at writing different elements. Exercises include writing a montage, for instance, and writing a series of shots (as used in chase scenes, gunfights, or barroom brawls), working with memory,
dreams, and flashbacks. In addition to class meetings, there will be an indie film shown each week which you will be required to attend, view, and critique in writing.

If you decide you seriously want to pursue the course, please send me a Letter of Interest – two or three pages about yourself, detailing your interest in film, your background in general, and in specific if you have writing experience here or elsewhere or have studied or worked in film. Earnestness, originality, curiosity, intellect, knowledge of films, writing experience, and enthusiasm for the subject are all points on. Please also include your full name, student ID #, and what class year you are, as upperclassmen may be given seats first since they might not have another chance to take the course.

No other writing sample is necessary, but please send your Letter of Interest to my email address (profrobison@gmail.com) in the next few weeks, and certainly by October 18 at the latest. There are many applicants for the fifteen seats, and we usually end up disappointing
latecomers.

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ENG 4133

Youth in European Cinema

Marina Hassapopoulou

Children, teenagers, and young adults have always been a central preoccupation in European filmmaking. The course will focus on recent European films that prominently feature youthful perspectives and allegorically address young European citizens during crucial transitional moments in European history. Cinematic depictions of youngsters will be explored as representational devices for processing and coping with turbulent sociopolitical situations, cultural concerns, and ethical crises in contemporary Europe. The theme of youth will provide a starting point for interdisciplinary inquiry regarding “the capacity of film to represent different aspects of history, and potentially to explore dimensions which are beyond written history,” as Roger Hillman has argued. In addition, cinematic youth will motivate discussion on past and present opportunities offered to young people in Europe, and invite students to assess some of the initiatives available in the contexts of inter-European relations and globalization.

The course will analyze recent films in which the aesthetics of youth function as unapologetic political satire, inject pacifist messages into grave situations, exude a feeling of nostalgia, challenge and/or solidify collective memory, help cope with national trauma, and/or project utopian visions of past and future histories. The focus will be on influential and controversial European youth films that have managed to transcend their “entertainment” value and spark debate through their metacinematic reflexivity. To navigate the complexities of these films, the course will begin by introducing cinematic subgenres that revolve around child development and upbringing (such as coming-of-age narratives and teenpics), in order to discover the ways these motifs create tropes for sociopolitical issues that extend beyond the realm of the cinematic.

In addition to interdisciplinary theory and criticism, film screenings will include Pan’s Labyrinth (Guillermo del Toro, 2006), A Touch of Spice (Tassos Boulmetis, 2003), L’Auberge Espagnole (Cédric Klapisch, 2002), Let the Right One In (Tomas Alfredson, 2008), and Dogtooth (Giorgos Lanthimos, 2009), and others.

Attendance is mandatory. Students are expected to actively participate in class discussions and activities. Assignments include quizzes, film response papers, a 5–7 page final paper, a multimedia presentation of the final project, and a final exam.

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ENG 4134

Women & Fashion in French Film

Sylvie Blum

The class is tailored around the topics of women, fashion and style in French culture. The perspective will be developed through the lens of literature, film and theory spanning over several decades of the twentieth century. The material bridges different areas of cultural and film studies. Through various readings, film screenings, virtual site visits, the student will acquire the necessary tools and terminology to decode the system and what distinguishes style from fashion in France, in a multidisciplinary approach. Areas covered include architecture, design, advertisement, theater costumes and film. The course is taught in English; it is designed for third and fourth year French students, preferably students who are already versed and interested in exploring and analyzing literary and cultural texts. The students will familiarize themselves with the proper terminology, and acquire knowledge in this domain that is rich in history and cultural markers. The readings contain biographical and personal narratives, as well as theoretical and cultural essays about France. The films screenings go back to classical French cinema, as well as recent documentary and popular films.

*This class may count toward the French major, minor, or as an elective.

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ENG 4135

Brazilian Cinema

Mary Ginway

Course description not available at this time.

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ENG 4146

Cameraless Filmmaking

Roger Beebe

This class focuses on ways of making moving image work without using a camera. We’ll cover lots of advanced (and primitive) techniques for making moving images, mostly on celluloid (so "real film" as opposed to video). We’ll build our own thaumatropes, praxinoscopes, and/or zoetropes. We’ll learn to hand process hi-contrast film in tupperware, build our own contact printers using sync blocks, flashlights, and toilet paper tubes, make Rayographs, and use an optical printer. We’ll curate a show of found oddities from the cast offs of the public library system and make a bunch of flickering oddities of our own (from flipbooks to films). This class will be VERY experimental in nature. If you're excited about this and ready to spend hours and hours experimenting, this might be the best class you'll ever take. If you're just looking for a production class offering, this probably isn't the class for you.

There’s an application process, and it begins a few weeks before advance registration begins. If you’re interested in this class, email <rogerbb@ufl.edu> to request an application. NO PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE WITH FILM or VIDEO PRODUCTION NECESSARY (although preference will be given to students who have taken other Film and Media Studies classes, especially ENG 2300: Film Analysis, ENG 3115: Intro to Film Theory, or the film history series (ENG 3121, 3122, “3123”)). A willingness to accept an open and exploratory class and to abandon all preconceptions is required.

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ENG 4844

Queer Theory

Kim Emery

Course description not available at this time.

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ENG 4905

Independent Study

Faculty Member of Choice

An Independent Study course may be taken for 1 to 3 credit hours, but will only count toward the fulfillment of the 10-course requirement for the English major if a student registers for 3 credit hours.

This course is for advanced students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The student must find a faculty member who is willing to supervise the semester-long study, and together, the two create a project. The student must meet with the professor at designated times, agreed upon in advance, and complete all assignments in a timely manner.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Postcolonial Theory

Malini Schueller

This course introduces you to the field of postcolonial theory. By the beginning of the twentieth century, a few European powers had colonized 80% of Asia and Africa. Nationalist movements during the latter half of the century led to territorial, but not necessarily economic, cultural and intellectual decolonization. The continuing cultural, political, and economic effects of colonialism, as well as new forms of colonialism and imperialism sanctioned on the global South constitute the field of postcolonial studies. We will study the ways in which postcolonial theory has intersected with and impacted diverse areas of inquiry such as feminism, historiography, ethnography, politics, and literature. At the same time, this course will stress the importance of historicizing postcoloniality. The course will focus on the central concerns of postcolonial studies: the nature of colonial discourse, the articulation of revolutionary national consciousness, questions of subalternity and history, the relationship of postcolonial studies to gender studies, and the politics of contemporary colonialism. We will read the works of major revolutionaries and theorists and the debates and arguments about these works. The course will cover writings from and about the major parts of the world affected by imperialism: Europe, Asia, Africa, Central America, the Caribbean, the Middle East, and the U.S..

Possible Texts:

Colonial Discourse and Postcolonial Theory, Ed. Patrick Williams and Laura Chrisman
Edward Said’s Orientalism
History of Mary Prince, Ed. Moira Ferguson
There will be additional critical essays. Other texts will be decided later.

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ENG 4936

Honors Seminar: Victorian Literature & Class

Pamela Gilbert

Class identities as we understand them today came to exist, in large part, in the late eighteenth century and early nineteenth century. It is a period obsessed both with the possibility of abolishing differences of caste and class and with the attempt to fix them as essential identity categories. This course will be an opportunity to think about class in the Victorian period in Britain, and earlier systems underlying and informing it. We will focus on the novel as the privileged literary form for the elaboration of middle-class identity and also in which authors explored the role of class in a newly mobile, industrial and imperial society. We will read a number of Victorian novels and other texts from the period, as well as secondary works on class. Authors and novels will likely include some or all of the following: Elizabeth Gaskell, North and South; Charles Dickens, Our Mutual Friend; Anthony Trollope, The Prime Minister; Margaret Oliphant, Phoebe Jr.; Arthur Morrison, Child of the Jago; George and Weedon Grossmith, Diary of a Nobody. We will also discuss how class has changed and how it has remained with us in our own present day culture. Requirements will likely include a long paper, five two page response papers, and a creative project – as well as lots of reading and discussion.

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ENG 4940

Internship

Undergraduate Coordinator

The English Department at the University of Florida offers three* credit hours of internship to its majors who provide the following to the Undergraduate Coordinator for approval:

Once the Undergraduate Coordinator has approved the internship requested by the student, the department will register the student for the internship credits.

Upon completion of the internship:

*For two credit hours, the student would need to work 8 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 16 hours per week for Summer A or B.

*For one credit hour, the student would need to work 4 hours per week in a Fall, Spring, or Summer C semester; and 8 hours per week for Summer A or B.

Please note the following limitations on the English Internship:

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ENG 4953

Department Seminar: Toni Morrison

Debra King

This course introduces students to an extraordinary woman whose work, both fictional and critical, has shaken the foundations of American literature (and criticism) to reconstitute both it and the boundaries of its canon. Students will investigate why critics herald Toni Morrison as the “most formally sophisticated novelist in the history of African-American literature” while also discovering why she is its most renowned. Morrison’s work has earned the highest accolades in contemporary literary circles: the National Book Critics Circle Award and the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters Award for Song of Solomon in 1977, the Pulitzer Prize and the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Beloved in 1988, and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993 (among others). Her novels explore themes of naturalistic fiction while also engaging the more dramatic themes of modernism: death, love, rebirth, responsibility, and memory. They are lyrical prose memorials to suffering and loss that move beyond characters’ victimization towards rectification, reconciliation, renewal and revival.

Toni Morrison has published ten novels, a play, a short story and several critical pieces. This semester we will read most of her fiction and some of her non-fiction, focusing on several themes. Among them are the relationship of the sacred to the secular, history and heritage, identity and subjectivity, language and rhetorical strategy, motherhood and self, life and love. We will also evaluate what critics have to say about Morrison, how they construct and reconstruct the artist and her work, as well as evaluate the author’s own creative and critical perspectives.

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ENG 4970

Honors Thesis Project

Faculty members (2) of Choice

Students must have have completed at least one semester of ENG 4936, Honors Seminar. Open to English Honors students.

The student must select two faculty members: one to direct the reading, research, and writing of a thesis on a topic of the student’s and director’s chosing, and another as the second reader. An abstract (100 to 200 words) and one copy of the thesis (30 to 50 pages) must be delivered to the CLAS Academic Advising Center on Fletcher Road at least 10 days before graduation.

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ENL 3122

English Novel Nineteenth Century

Pamela Gilbert

This course samples key developments in the British novel through the nineteenth century. We will examine the novels within three contexts: historical, literary-historical, and critical. If you have not had English 2022, you should plan to familiarize yourself with the period: the Norton Anthology introduction to the period is a good place to start. Gilmour’s and Houghton’s books are also very useful and are on reserve in the library.

The Victorian period was the great age of the novel’s emergence as a dominant popular form within a newly extensive literary marketplace, and Victorian novelists were consummate entertainers driven to sell widely and well. They were also preoccupied with the condition of their own culture; to paraphrase Richard Altick, rarely is the Present so much present in literature as it is in the novel of this period. Victorian novelists considered it their duty and pleasure to criticize, praise and generally comment upon current issues, and they developed new forms and genres to accommodate their purposes. These issues represent the formative phases of social concerns which we have inherited and which still define us: for example, the role of mass media, the ethics of capitalism, gender roles, the responsibilities of liberal government, the welfare state, pollution, the role of nation in the global community, etc. We will read a range of representative genres and consider them not only in the light of the emergence of the novel as a dominant form, but as documents of a culture’s attempts to represent and work out these issues of contemporary importance – aesthetically and ethically – and consider the ways in which Victorian ideas resonate for us today.

This course provides upper-division credit in the major, and will be taught with that in mind; therefore, students will be expected to know how to do research in the field and to attempt the application of critical frameworks. Due to the nature of the material, there is a considerable amount of reading. Carefully consider your reading speed and the expectations of the other courses you are taking before committing to this course.

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ENL 3132

English Novel Twentieth Century

Brandon Kershner

The course is a survey of the development of the twentieth-century “British” novel (including Ireland) through the present. The first half of the course will stress the arrival of modernism in the novel and the particular influence of literary impressionism; the second will explore lesser-known novelists, especially women, who are often excluded from surveys. We will also examine the question of postmodernism in the novel.

Requirements include two short essays (roughly eight typed pages in length). The subject of the first paper will be point of view in one of the authors we read before the midterm; the subject of the second will be open, but it must concern the work of one of the novelists we are reading after the midterm. There will be a midterm and a final exam, both including objective and essay parts, but the objective part of the final will not be cumulative. Papers and exams count equally toward your grade. Depending upon the class's demonstrated preparedness, there may be occasional quizzes, each counting 1/4 of a paper grade. An additional grade, between C and A, will reflect your class participation.

Books may include Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness (Bedford Books); Ford Madox Ford, The Good Soldier; Katherine Mansfield, Stories; James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Bedford Books); Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; E. M. Forster, Howards End; Iris Murdoch, Under the Net; Zadie Smith, White Teeth; R. B. Kershner, The Twentieth-century Novel, An Introduction.

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ENL 3154

Twentieth Century British Poetry

Marsha Bryant

This course provides in-depth analysis of W.B. Yeats, Wilfred Owen, T. S. Eliot, W.H. Auden, Stevie Smith, Philip Larkin, Ted Hughes, Linton Kwesi Johnson, and current Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy. We will examine their poems, lives, and cultural contexts. As we move through the semester, gender, family, and nation become increasingly dislocated as traditional concepts of “poetry” and “British” continue to shift. Course assignments are two papers, a panel presentation, a parody, reading quizzes, and engaged participation in discussion. Our work together will sharpen your skills in literary analysis, as well as provide strategies for writing more clearly and effectively.

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ENL 3241

Romantic Poetry

Donald Ault

This course will focus on Blake, Coleridge, and Byron, with some readings in Wordsworth, Keats, and selected literary theoretical texts. The work in the course will emphasize close reading of texts that present interpretive difficulties at the level of their material production (including variant editions, revisions, different versions, spatial layout of syntax, etc.), taking into account the tendency of Romantic texts to resist being “finished.” We will read these texts against the grain in order to explore interferences within their ideological and textual fields.

Text requirement: course pack from Xerographic Copy Center, 927 NW 13th St.

Course requirements: good attendance, productive class participation, several short papers, and a final paper/project.

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ENL 3251

Victorian Literature: Ways of Seeing

Kayley Thomas

John Ruskin wrote in 1856 that “the greatest thing a human soul ever does in this world is to see something.” As a result of innovations in technology and science, changing trends in aesthetic philosophies, and shifts in valuations of the purpose of culture and the arts, the Victorians lived in an age of complex, constantly evolving, and competing ways of seeing. Throughout the course of the semester, we will seek to investigate what Kate Flint calls in The Victorians and the Visual Imagination, “the tension that existed between the different valuations given to outward and inward seeing; to observation, on the one hand, and the life of the imagination on the other” (2). Of particular interest for our purposes will be: art, literary, and cultural criticism; fictions of detection and investigation; and the “sister arts” of poetry and painting. In exploring these ways of seeing, we will also engage with a variety of lenses through which the Victorians viewed the world and created their critical and artistic reflections upon it, including religion, science, nationhood, class, gender, and sexuality. We will study a number of key figures in poetry, fiction, drama, visual art, and critical theory of the period, which will likely include some of the following: Matthew Arnold, Thomas Carlyle, Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Robert Browning, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Christina Rossetti, John Ruskin, Walter Pater, William Morris, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Oscar Wilde, Aubrey Beardsley, Ella D’Arcy, Vernon Lee, Max Beerbohm, and others.

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ENL 4221

Milton's Major Poems

Peter Rudnytsky

The course will focus on a close reading of Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. Theological, political, psychological, and gender issues will be considered. Course requirements are a midterm, final, and one five-page paper.

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ENL 4311

Chaucer: Canterbury Tales

R. Allen Shoaf

This course will be devoted to the Canterbury Tales, which we will read in their entirety (only one textbook as such will be required). Some ancillary reading in certain Latin texts will be assigned (probably by way of a small course-pack), but the primary focus will be Chaucer’s career from about 1387 until his death in October, 1400 (the traditional, conventional date). All readings in the CT will be in Middle English and some time will be spent on Chaucer’s pronunciation (reconstructed) and his prosody, but the course is not a course in language as such. Three essays will be required; no examinations will be assigned. The course is reading intensive; and class participation is expected.

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare: Doing It

Sidney Homan

We “study” Shakespeare by staging scenes from his plays. Each student works with an acting partner – the couple is responsible for performing 3–4 shortened versions of scenes, then working with me as their director.

In effect, we approach Shakespeare’s plays as actors and directors, charged with building a character, enacting that character through delivery, gesture, stage movement, subtext.

We will look at Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Macbeth, The Taming of the Shrew, Othello, Much Ado about Nothing, and Stoppard’s reworking of Hamlet in his Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.

Students are graded equally on their scene work and a short paper in which they assess their rehearsal experience with the scene, from the perspective of both the character and their decisions as an actor.

Sidney Homan is Professor of English at the University of Florida, the author of some eleven books on Shakespeare and the modern playwrights. He also works as an actor and director in professional and university theatres.

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ENL 4333

Shakespeare: The Tragedies

R. Allen Shoaf

This course will be devoted to the ten tragedies Shakespeare wrote in his career, with especial attention to three factors: his transformation of the genre (most especially in King Lear); the rhetorics he renewed (e.g., pun) or refined (e.g., synoeciosis; paradox) to articulate his tragic vision; and his response to the sacramentality of nature that enabled him to comprehend and mourn humans’ catastrophic denials and perversions of nature, sexual nature in particular, in consequence of which self-inflicted optionlessness must lead inevitably to the end of the human.

Mandatory attendance and two essays (5–7 pages in length), along with unannounced quizzes, will constitute evaluation of your performance in the course.

The one text for the course will be the Norton Shakespeare, 2nd edition, which I will order through the university’s stipulated portal.

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LIT 3003

Storytelling

Robert Ray

When a character in Doris Lessing’s Golden Notebook suggests that she could turn a serious novel into a romance simply by leaving out certain kinds of words, we remember the old lesson: how stories get told makes all the difference. This course will examine the storytelling choices made by writers and filmmakers by starting with the effect those choices have on us as readers or viewers. Since the course assumes no previous study of the cinema, English majors concentrating on literature should not fear starting from behind. Conversely, however, students interested primarily, or exclusively, in film should note that we will devote more than half our time to literature.

Readings will include stories by Hemingway, Chekhov, Turgenev, Doyle, Borges, and Hardy; novels by Penelope Fitzgerald, and Anthony Powell. We will watch movies by Kiarostami (Tickets), Antonioni (L’Avventura), Cukor (The Philadelphia Story), Capra, (It Happened One Night), and others. We will read criticism by Barthes (S/Z), Forster (Aspects of the Novel), Seymour Chatman, Stanley Cavell (The World Viewed), V.F. Perkins, and Andrew Klevan.

Assignments: weekly reading quizzes, two oral presentations, two written assignments (short papers or take-home exams).

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LIT 3003

Forms of Narrative

Donald Ault

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 3043

Modern Drama: Doing It

Sidney Homan

The assumption in all my theatre courses is that the text of a play is not just what is written on the page but that text in performance, delivered by actors before an audience. This means the play’s text also includes gestures, movement, blocking (the stage picture), and sub-text (what the character is saying inwardly, beneath the lines delivered onstage, as well as the “history” for that character invented by the actor). In the theatre, we would further supplement this text with lighting, sound, set, costumes, props, and make-up. To be sure, one can approach a play in a thousand ways – as literature, as a repository for the thinking of an age, as the springboard for political or cultural issues. But, since I work both on campus and in the theatre as an actor and director, and since the theatre itself is a unique medium with its own aesthetic principles, I approach the plays, with my students, and as a fellow “student,” as something meant to be performed by an actor and ratified by an audience. In the class each student will have a scene partner with whom he or she stages several scenes each semester. Once performed, the class and I, as co-directors, “work” that scene with the two actors, trying out options, rehearsing it. The emphasis, therefore, is on learning by doing, and I judge student work by intent, what goes into the performance – not by finesse. If there is finesse, that is considered a bonus. Each actor also writes a short paper assessing his or her experience during rehearsal for a scene. Performances and the scene papers count equally.

In this course, we will thus consider Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, Embers, All That Fall, Play, Eh Joe, Not I, and Come and Go; Harold Pinter’s The Lover, Old Times, Betrayal, and No Man’s Land; Sam Shepard’s True West, Curse of the Starving Class, and Buried Child; and Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.

A word of comfort: whether you have acted before or not, experience in the theatre is not a factor in the class. We use acting as a way of studying the text. Have no fears on this issue!

If you have any questions or comments, please e-mail Professor Homan at < shakes@ufl.edu>.

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LIT 3173

Motherhood in Modern Hebrew Literature

Avrham Balaban

The course examines the different representations of motherhood in Hebrew literature throughout the twentieth century. The selected short stories and novels compare the situation of mothers in traditional, religious Jewish society to their situation in a modern, secular culture. Along with depicting the changing image of motherhood throughout the twentieth century, the course will discuss the differences between male descriptions of motherhood and female descriptions (cf. Helene Cixous’ emphasis on female style, suitable for the unique female experience). A new generation of women writers, over the past two decades, has added several dimensions to the way mothers had been depicted in Hebrew prose. With the typical shift of point of view from a child-narrator to a mother-narrator, the concept of the mother as a nurturing, self-sacrificing, almost selfless creature, who lives to serve her children, has almost disappeared. Instead, motherhood is described as a conflict-ridden situation. 

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LIT 3362

Avant-Garde Film

Scott Nygren

Avant-garde film is a term of convenience for a project that continually reinvents itself outside established media and conventions. This project escapes any easy category, and has been referred to at various times as experimental, abstract, underground, personal, structuralist, materialist and/or independent film and video. What is normally called the avant-garde constitutes a wild array of media practices where the only common feature is the rule of no rules.

Historically, the term “avant-garde” can be traced to movements in literature and art during the late 19th century in France. The extension of avant-garde ideas to film begins after World War I, when artists and writers such as Hans Richter, Man Ray, Antonin Artaud, Germaine Dulac, Luis Bunuel, and Jean Cocteau produced radical new works that broke with classical conventions and outraged audiences. The 1920s movement now known as the historical avant-garde then retrospectively reconsidered a few early filmmakers as precursors, and rediscovered Melies and Feuillade. This process continues today, and research in early film has since rediscovered many innovations and experiments including the Brighton School in England.

Forgotten in Europe during the 1930's, after being marginalized by economic depression, expensive new technology and attacks by right-wing extremists, the avant-garde re-emerged during and after World War II among a new generation of Americans eager to break with prewar conventions. Filmmakers like Maya Deren, Kenneth Anger, Stan Brakhage, Bruce Conner, and Jonas Mekas transformed what was thought possible. European filmmakers such as Kurt Kren, Malcolm LeGrice, Yann Beauvais and Valie Export then renewed the international character of the avant-garde. Declared dead in the 1980's, as supposedly obsolete, non-commercial and ahistorical, avant-garde practices have reappeared since the 1990's as powerful strategies to articulate gender and culture, often reconceiving history as a frontier. A proliferation of new books rethinking the avant-garde and the recent expansion of film and video in art galleries and museums testify to the resurgent vitality of the avant-garde. Film and video makers such as Tracey Moffat, Wu Ming, Marlon Fuentes, Yael Bartana, Pierre Huyghe, Renee Green and Elja-Liisa Ahtila represent a new generation of world production and invention.

Accordingly, the class will consider avant-garde film and video as visual strategies for engaging new media, social and cultural conditions without the preconditions that limit commercial production. These visual strategies will be considered as tools able to work through many of the social and cultural issues implied by digital media, while ironically the mass marketing of computers as interactive multimedia remains bound up with literary models of page design and illustrative graphics restricted by fantasies of control. The course will be metahistorical in the sense of addressing past films and videos not as a developing sequence, but as zones of dynamic intensity that remain generative for potential work today.

The required readings are designed both to be introductory, for those new to media and cultural studies, and to recontextualize and theorize issues for those students prepared for advanced topics. Students will be asked to choose between writing papers and generating conceptual/artistic projects, or to do one of each, to fulfill the requirements of the course.

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LIT 3400

Internet Literature

Gregory Ulmer

The general topic for this seminar is the relationship of technology to literature. Specifically, we will focus on what happens to literary forms and their study in the medium of the World Wide Web. Our interest in part is in the migration of print forms and modes onto the Internet, and also in the emergence of new forms of creativity native to the Internet. Lev Manovich, in The Language of New Media, observes that the cut-and-paste tools of hypermedia authoring embody the aesthetics created by the experimental arts of 1920s modernism. This observation provides a point of departure for our own experiments, investigating the relationship between experimental poetics, the digital medium, and Internet creativity. The primary goal of the course is to adapt the practices of new media creativity to the design of a mode of study native to the Internet. The course is taught in a CIRCA classroom. The course project is created in the blog medium, supplemented by basic photoshop. We will experiment with the design of a new mode of study that takes advantage of the resources of hypermedia and the aesthetics of popular culture and surrealism. The semester project is to design and test the “learning screen,” that does for Internet culture what the “research paper” did for print education. Previous experience with Web authoring (blog, photoshop) is helpful but not required. However, beginners should expect to spend some extra time learning to use the authoring environment.

Required readings (tentative):

Italo Calvino, Six Memos for the Next Millenium
Linda Seger, The Art of Adaptation
Sean Hall (Introduction to semiotics)
Electronic Literature Collection

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LIT 4183

Literatures of Crisis

Apollo Amoko

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 4192

Caribbean Literature in English

Agnel Barron

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 4194

The Drama of Africa

Apollo Amoko

Course description not available at this time.

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LIT 4331

Children's Literature

Anastasia Ulanowicz

This course will provide an introduction to major works of American children’s literature written from 1868 to 2000. As we examine these texts, we will consider how and why (or even whether) they might be read specifically as children’s books – and how, moreover, their study might prompt us to evaluate the American literary canon in its various historical permutations.  Additionally, we will question the ways in which these texts represent race, class, gender, and – perhaps most significantly – national identity.  Of particular interest will be the question of how these texts use the figure of the child to support (or contest) notions of nationhood and citizenship.

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LIT 4332

Literature for Young Children

Anastasia Ulanowicz

The picturebook is not an especially well-recognized or respected form in literary studies: its value is conventionally determined as merely educational or recreational. The purpose of this class, however, is to question and possibly undermine conventional assumptions about the picturebook. During the course of the semester, we will read a number of picturebooks alongside Jonathan Culler’s handbook, Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction, in order to interrogate the literary value of picturebooks – and in order to question how we define “literary value” in the first place. Toward the end of the semester, we will study texts that are not traditionally considered picturebooks – for example, photo albums, graphic novels, short stories, and novels – in order to further challenge our assumptions about this rich and often misunderstood form.

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LIT 4334

The Golden Age of Children's Literature

Rebekah Fitzsimmons

In this class, we will read and analyze classic children’s literature texts from the Golden Age of Children’s Literature. This first so-called “Golden Age” generally encompasses 1865–1926 in both British and American children’s literature (though we will likely investigate the validity of these dates). Many of the texts published for children during this period are regarded as important and canonical works of children’s literature, against which all other children’s literature should be compared. These texts often innovated new forms or established common themes (orphans, innocence, coming of age) that are considered indicative of contemporary children’s literature. We will look at a variety of texts as well as contemporary re-imaginings or re-tellings of these famous stories.

In addition to studying the actual texts published for children during this period, we will also investigate the historical, political, and social ramifications of labeling a specific period of time a “Golden Age,” and of naming a text a “classic.” We will look closely at the professionals (librarians, educators, academics) who claim the authority to segregate these texts and ask why some texts are deemed classics while others are deemed trash. We will spend time reading secondary and academic works that explore the questions of canon formation, taste culture, cultural hierarchies and definitions of children’s literature. It is my hope that these explorations will lead to a substantive discussion of current trends in and criticism of contemporary children’s literature.

Students should be prepared to engage with these fictional and academic texts in a variety of media (papers, blogs, presentations, quizzes).

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SPC 3605

Speechwriting

Ron Carpenter

Speechwriting is an advanced composition course. In this course, students acquire stylistic prowess by which their sentences have increased potential to be remembered and quoted and thereby achieve greater persuasiveness. The course is called Speechwriting because models to be imitated are in sentences of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, John Kennedy, and Martin Luther King, Jr., for examples. Although you practice these stylistic skills while writing speeches, the acquired prowess is applicable in many future communication endeavors, as speakers or writers, regardless of profession. The textbook is Ronald H. Carpenter, Choosing Powerful Words: Eloquence that Works.

This course is not about supporting arguments or organizing them into broader discourse. For those skills, other courses are more appropriate. Speechwriting is about the best words and their best orders – within sentences – to achieve optimal impress of your ideas upon readers or listeners. Your writing is perfected in drafts that you aloud among peers (and for me), wherein you should acquire a sense of what to do to achieve the final product desired at the semester end. Thus, present drafts when due; listen carefully to other students’ drafts; participate in rewriting others’ sentences; and heed my commentary about all drafts. Do not assume that participation means simply presenting your drafts and listening only to commentary about them.

Your first speech will be written after we analyze and identify sources of style in Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and John Kennedy’s Inaugural Address. You will rewrite the Gettysburg Address, as Ted Sorensen would have helped John Kennedy write it. This assignment will improve your flexibility as a stylist. For the speech praising a person for whom you have great love or admiration, you must write for an actual occasion when that person will hear or read your statement (you will earn many “points” from that person as well as other people). For the speech praising an institution or ideal, you will write about something that you are likely to address in later life, perhaps as a professional person (I predict that years later you will take that text from your files and use it again for part – if not most – of a speech that you likely will give).

How a draft is presented, vocally and physically, has no bearing on your grade (for help with delivery skills other courses are appropriate; but I may make suggestions about how to improve your platform presence, however). The important point is that Speechwriting is an advanced composition course, wherein you read drafts aloud as bases of discussion by which all students understand how and why some sentences are better than others. For initial and final drafts, I require computer word processing. Revision is easier; spelling is accurate; and word lengths of drafts are known.

From past experience, I know that reasonably diligent students will achieve some of the stylistic skills taught in this course. Final grades are higher, however, as you (1) demonstrate refined prowess as the competent stylist on exams and in final drafts, (2) understand course precepts derived from readings and lecture materials, as tested by three exams during the semester (the course has no final exam), and (3) produce a final research paper about style as defined in this course (research paper options will be explained during a lecture relatively early in the semester and will require additional Web and library reading). In combination, initial drafts, exam answers wherein you demonstrate stylistic prowess, final polished drafts, group projects, and your research paper will total well over 6,000 words evaluated by me for Gordon Rule credit (in case you wish to make that claim).

Final grades are determined one–half by the average of your three exam scores and one–half by your final notebook with polished drafts of writing and the research paper – all typed, double–spaced, and turned in at the time and date listed in the University Timetable as the course final exam period. Although this is a writing course, I am impressed – for purposes of grades – by how much you know about style as defined in this course. Moreover, please appreciate that this composition course is unlike virtually all other persuasive writing courses at the University of Florida. The expertise and confidence in the precepts being taught are derived from your instructor’s own published research in six books, several book chapters, and numerous research journal articles (all of which informed my writing of your textbook).

In conclusion, teaching you to be eloquent stylists gives me great personal satisfaction. From my experience as a communications consultant for organizations outside the university (such as corporate executives, lawyers, civic leaders, hospital administrators, public relations professionals, CPAs, and officers attending the U.S. Naval War College), I know that skills acquired in this course will be useful for the rest of your life, no matter what your later profession is. The only prerequisite for the course is ability to write grammatical sentences that are spelled and punctuated correctly.

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SPC 4680

Rhetorical Criticism: Masterpieces of Rhetoric

Ron Carpenter

Our focus this semester is several “masterpieces of rhetoric.” Although many of these are in the realm of political and presidential discourse, another focus is rhetoric to persuade Americans about armed conflict abroad. Thus, students will examine how some speakers, writers, and filmmakers appealed successfully to specific attitudes and actions that had profound influence upon the course of events. The primary goal of the course is a refined sense of some rhetorical principles and techniques by which their own future discourse is persuasive.

Unlike previous semesters, the course now has no textbook because much of your course material now is on-line through <http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speechbank.html>. Major class assignments are group projects. By the end of the third week of classes, you should be in a group with 5–6 other class members, who collaboratively will write speeches presented to the entire class for discussion and analyses, but these speeches in and of them selves will not be graded. Instead, for grading purposes, students individually – or in concert with 2 or 3 other peers (of their mutual choice) – will write for grades short papers identifying and evaluating the rhetorical choices and techniques utilized in the group speeches as presented and discussed in class. I will be naming, defining, and explaining the rhetorical factors that you likely will find yourself using well (or poorly). A practical guideline for you to follow is this: if I write a term on the board, the concept should be understood by you, placed in your class notes, and thereby usable in your future.

I am convinced that when groups argue among themselves about fulfilling assignments (including grammar and compositional prowess), final products are better. For example, after viewing Richard Nixon’s famous – or infamous – “Checkers” speech in 1952, we will study Ted Kennedy’s apologia after Ms. Kopechne died in his company. Then, groups of speechwriters will create the TV speech that Bill Clinton should have given within 48 hours after Monica Lewinsky first became newsworthy. For affiliating with other students this semester, one speechwriting group must be all male and another only females; the rest can be any combination. Short papers yield one-third of students’ final grades.

Your individual short papers (perhaps 3 typed double spaced pages) summarize and expand upon assigned readings, films, and group projects presented in class. The fifth short paper, exclusively an individual effort, will be the enthymeme assignment, which can be any length deemed necessary to attain the desired objective. A longer, individual final paper (7–8 typed pages) will report research about some topic suggested by the course (its focus must be developed in consultation with me so I can endorse in writing to you the appropriateness of your subject and research procedures). This paper will constitute another one-third of your final grade. For some research paper topics, considering the scope of the endeavor, I may approve of a collaborative research paper. The course also has an individual “take home” final exam for the final one-third of your grade. Please understand that group projects require meetings with your peers outside of regular class periods. You also are required to view some films outside of class, whether in groups or individually. As the course progresses this semester, I may amend the syllabus and its topics to take advantage of some current event as a topic for class consideration of rhetorical precepts and principles.

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