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ReThinking Deconstruction

Symposium Schedule of Events

10:00–11:30 AM. “Rethinking Deconstructions 1.” (Ruth McQuown Room, Dauer Hall)

Panel and Discussion. Participants: John P. Leavey, Maureen Turim, Gregory L. Ulmer, Julian Wolfreys (all are members of the Department of English, University of Florida); and Jane M. Love (Furman University)

1:00–2:30 PM. “Rethinking Deconstructions 2.” (Keene Faculty Center, Dauer Hall)

Lecture and Discussion. “The Deconstruction of a Kiss: Caspar Goodwood’s Kiss of Isabel Archer in The Portrait of a Lady.” J. Hillis Miller, Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature, University of California, Irvine.

3:00–4:30 PM. “Rethinking Deconstructions 3.” (Keene Faculty Center, Dauer Hall)

Lecture and Discussion. “Reading Phenomena.” Peggy Kamuf, Marion Frances Chevalier Professor in French and Comparative Literature, University of Southern California.

4:45–6:00 PM. “Rethinking Deconstructions 4.” (Keene Faculty Center, Dauer Hall)

Roundtable Discussion, including all Symposium participants.

About the Invited Lecturers

Peggy Kamuf is Marion Frances Chevalier Professor in French and Comparative Literature at the University of Southern California. She is the author of Fictions of Feminine Desire, Signature Pieces: On the Institution of Authorship; and The Division of Literature, or the University in Deconstruction. She has also edited two collections of essays by Jacques Derrida (A Derrida Reader and Without Alibi) and translated work by Derrida, Jean-Luc Nancy, and others. Her essays on literary theory, deconstruction, feminism, and the institution have frequently appeared in anthologies and are forthcoming in a collection, Book of Addresses.

J. Hillis Miller was educated at Oberlin and Harvard. He taught for many years at Johns Hopkins and Yale, then joined in 1986 the faculty of the University of California at Irvine as UCI Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature. He is the author of many books and articles on nineteenth and twentieth-century literature and on literary theory. His most recent books are Black Holes (Stanford), Reading Narrative (Oklahoma). Speech Acts in Literature (Stanford) and Others (Princeton) will be published in the fall of 2001.