Calendar of Events

Unless otherwise noted, all events are open to the public and free of charge.

Summer 2009

5/19/09

Conversations in Children’s Literature.“Let the Story Speak: On the Importance of Sharing Stories with Young People,” Meredith Ann Pierce, Alachua County Librarian-Supervisor and Fantasy Fiction Writer. Sponsored by the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture and the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. For more information, contact Ramona Caponegro at <ramonac@ufl.edu>. 7 PM. Goerings Book Store, 1717 NW First Avenue.

6/13/09

Jane Austen Society of North America will discuss Austen’s Lady Susan and In Defense of Mrs. Elton by Diana Birchall. 12:30-2:30 PM. Alachua County Library, Tower Road Branch . For more information, contact Amy Robinson <arobin@ufl.edu>.

6/16/09

Conversations in Children’s Literature. “Storytelling in the Content Areas,” Linda Martin, Library Media Specialist and 2009 Bechtel Fellow at the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. Sponsored by the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture and the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. For more information, contact Ramona Caponegro at <ramonac@ufl.edu>. 7 PM. Goerings Book Store, 1717 NW First Avenue.

8/18/09

Conversations in Children’s Literature. “In the Stacks: An Evening in the Baldwin Library,” Rita Smith, Curator of the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature, and Ramona Caponegro, Events Coordinator for the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture. Sponsored by the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture and the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. For more information, contact Ramona Caponegro at <ramonac@ufl.edu>. 7 PM. Goerings Book Store, 1717 NW First Avenue.

Fall 2009

8/31/09

EGO Teaching Workshop. Gary Hink and Cari Keebaugh present tips on teaching with technology. This workshop will especially interest instructors who currently or would like to use web sites, blogs, discussion forums, etc. (in addition to/beyond e-learning and simple "syllabus-in-HTML" pages). Topics will be tailored to the needs of the workshop participants. This workshop is a great place to bounce ideas off others and get advice from others who have been there. 5–7 PM. 150 Pugh Hall.

9/2/09

EGO Teaching Workshop. Melissa Mellon presents teaching strategies for teaching and building assignments. General topics-applying to AML, Brit and Film classes-may include: building syllabi, choosing a reading list, creating assignments, and pedagogical practices, among others. Topics may change depending on the needs of the workshop participants. All years and levels of experience welcome. 10:30 AM–12:30 PM. 150 Pugh Hall.

9/10/09

MFA@FLA Fiction & Poetry Reading. MFA students Anastasia Kozak and Hilary Jacqmin will read from their fiction and poetry. 8 PM. Volta Coffee, 48 SW 2nd Street.

9/10/09

EGO Teaching Workshop. Lyndsay Brown and Trisha Kannanwill highlight teaching strategies for teaching American and British literature and film. They will cover some of the department requirements, such as how to approach AML 2070 versus AML 2410, and will discuss any other areas of concern, such as in-class assignments versus formal paper assignments; whether or not to give a final exam; what texts to choose; and techniques regarding class discussions. 5–7 PM. 150 Pugh Hall.

9/14/09

EGO Teaching Workshop. Gary Hink and Cari Keebaugh present teaching strategies for building assignments. General topics – applying to American and British Literature and Film classes – may include: building syllabi, choosing a reading list, creating assignments, (types, major/minor, critical/creative/hybrid) and pedagogical practices, among others. Topics may change depending on the needs of the workshop participants. All years and levels of experience welcome. 5–7 PM. 150 Pugh Hall.

9/15/09

EGO Teaching Workshop. Christina Van Houten and Jordan Dominy present teaching strategies for teaching American Literature. More to the point, this workshop will model how an American Literature course might address a special topic, specific theme, or particular period. It will model “special topics” by way of “regionalisms” in twentieth-century American studies. This workshop, therefore, will focus on selecting reading lists (what kinds of texts work, what kinds don't), introducing theory as part of a pedagogical toolkit (how to contextualize syllabus readings in a larger academic discourse), and teasing out the way in which literature might open-up to larger historical narratives (how the assigned texts might interrogate larger political, cultural, and social movements). 4–6 PM. 150 Pugh Hall.

9/15/09

Conversations in Children’s Literature. “A Boy’s Book of the Scrub: Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and the Writing of The Yearling.” Florence M. Turcotte, Literary Manuscripts Archivist, UF Special Collections. Sponsored by the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture and the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. For more information, contact Ramona Caponegro at <ramonac@ufl.edu>. 7 PM. Goerings Book Store, 1717 NW First Avenue.

9/24/09

MFA@FLA Fiction & Poetry Reading. MFA students Harry Leeds and John Westbrook will read from their fiction and poetry. 8 PM. Volta Coffee, 48 SW 2nd Street.

10/8/09

MFA@FLA Fiction & Poetry Reading. MFA students Zacc Coker-Dukowitz and Terita Heath-Wlaz will read from their fiction and poetry. 8 PM. Volta Coffee, 48 SW 2nd Street.

10/15/09

The Interrogative Mood: A Novel? Padgett Powell discusses his new book. 7 PM. Prairie Creek Lodge, 7204 CR 234.

The Interrogative Mood: A Novel?
10/18/09

Historic Photos of the University of Florida Football. Kevin McCarthy discusses his new book. 2 PM. Goerings Book Store, 1717 NW First Avenue.

10/20/09

Conversations in Children’s Literature. “When Fantasy is Reality, or How to Make a World?” Stephanie A. Smith, UF Professor of English and Fantasy Fiction Writer. Sponsored by the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture and the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. For more information, contact Ramona Caponegro at <ramonac@ufl.edu>. 7 PM. Goerings Book Store, 1717 NW First Avenue.

10/22/09

MFA@FLA Fiction & Poetry Reading. MFA students Aaron Thier and David Fishman will read from their fiction and poetry. 8 PM. Volta Coffee, 48 SW 2nd Street.

10/23/09

EGO Publishing Workshop. Susan Hegeman, Marsha Bryant, Ramona Caponegro, and Carolyn Kelley will address the publishing process and cover several topics concerning the world of scholarly publishing. Topics will include how to select journals to publish in, how to write a structured abstract, tips on writing the paper, and impact factors. All years (and questions) welcome. 4–5:30 PM. Place: 150 Pugh Hall.

10/28/09

Child of All Nations. Michael Hofmann reads from his new translation of a novel by Irmgad Keun. 8 PM. Goerings Book Store, 1717 NW First Avenue.

11/5/09

MFA@FLA Fiction & Poetry Reading. MFA students Christina Nichol and Bredt Bredthauer will read from their fiction and poetry. 8 PM. Volta Coffee, 48 SW 2nd Street.

 
11/12–11/13/09

2009 EGO conference “Home/sickness: Desire, Decay, and the Seduction of Nostalgia.” Dominick LaCapra (Bryce and Edith M. Bowmar Professor of Humanistic Studies, Cornell University) will give the keynote address, “Coetzee, Sebald, and the Narrative of Trauma,” Friday, 11/13. 7 PM. Ulster Atrium. For the full conference schedule, visit the conference website. (Click on image to view a full-size version of the poster)

2009 Florida Writers' Festival
11/12–11/14/09

2009 Florida Writers Festival. Readings and informal talks by Chris Adrian, Chris Bachelder, Chris Tusa, and C.D. Wright. Except where otherwise noted, all events will take place at Smathers Library East, Room 1A. (Click on image for full details, including to view a full-size version of the poster)

  • Thursday, 7:30 PM. Reading by Chris Tusa, Alachua County Public Library, 401 E. University Avenue.
  • Friday, 8 PM. Readings by Chris Bachelder and C.D. Wright.
  • Saturday, 1–3 PM. Informal talks by Chris Adrian, Chris Bachelder, and C.D. Wright.
  • Saturday, 8 PM. Reading by Chris Adrian.
2009 Florida Writers' Festival
11/13/09

Good Bye DDR: Memory and Material Culture. Roundtable discussion with Franz Futterknecht, Brian Ladd, Elizabeth Mittman, Barbara Mennel. Sponsored by the Center for The Humanities and the Public Sphere with support from the Rothman Fund. 4 PM. Dauer Hall, Ruth McGown Room.

11/17/09

Conversations in Children’s Literature. “Unwrapping Stories: Recent Must-Reads for Holiday Giving.” John Cech, UF Professor of English and Director of the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture, and Ramona Caponegro, Coordinator of the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture. For more information, contact Ramona Caponegro at <ramonac@ufl.edu>. 7 PM. Goerings Book Store, 1717 NW First Avenue.

11/18/09

Life between Two Deaths, 1989–2001: U.S. Culture in the Long Nineties. Phil Wegner discusses his new book. 8 PM. Goerings Book Store, 1717 NW First Avenue.

Life between Two Deaths, 1989-2001: U.S. Culture in the Long Nineties
11/22/09

MFA@FLA Fiction & Poetry Reading. MFA students Kate Sayre and Rachel McGahey will read from their fiction and poetry. 8 PM. Volta Coffee, 48 SW 2nd Street.

12/04/09

EGO Job Searching in Academia Workshop. Sid Dobrin will address the job search process from credentialing through job applications, interviews, and offers. This workshop will be as useful to new graduate students as it would be for those graduate students soon to enter the market. All years welcome. 4–7 PM. Location TBA.

12/6/09

An Evening with William Shakespeare.” Sidney Homan and the graduate students in this fall’s Shakespeare seminar present a collage of scenes from the plays. The will perform everything from Bottom as Pyramus, to Cleopatra with the asps, the great love scenes, Lear and Cordelia, Viola and Olivia, Hal and the French Princess, Kate and Petruchio, a smattering of sonnets, from The Comedy of Errors to The Tempest. Tickets are sold at the door the night of the performance for $5. 8 PM. Acrosstown Repertory Theatre (619 South Main Street).

Spring 2010

1/13/10

The Department’s Composition and Rhetoric Search Committee will provide public forums for candidates to present their research and teaching interests. Byron Hawk will have his research presentation at 2 PM in 219 Dauer.

1/14/10

The Department’s Composition and Rhetoric Search Committee will provide public forums for candidates to present their research and teaching interests. Byron Hawk will have his teaching presentation at 2 PM in 219 Dauer.

1/19/10

Conversations in Children’s Literature. “Not Just for Children: Re-reading Jules Verne (With Your Children),” Terry Harpold, UF Associate Professor of English. Sponsored by the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture and the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. For more information, contact Ramona Caponegro at <ramonac@ufl.edu>. 7 PM. Education Library, Norman Hall.

1/21/10

The Department’s Composition and Rhetoric Search Committee will provide public forums for candidates to present their research and teaching interests. Jason Helms will have his research presentation at 2:30 PM in 215 Dauer.

1/22/10

The Department’s Composition and Rhetoric Search Committee will provide public forums for candidates to present their research and teaching interests. Jason Helms will have his teaching presentation at 10 PM in 215 Dauer.

1/28/10

The Department’s Composition and Rhetoric Search Committee will provide public forums for candidates to present their research and teaching interests. Scot Barnet will have his research presentation at 2:30 PM in 215 Dauer.

1/29/10

The Department’s Composition and Rhetoric Search Committee will provide public forums for candidates to present their research and teaching interests. Scot Barnet will have his teaching presentation at 11 PM in 215 Dauer.

2/1/10

Stammtisch Graduate Talk in Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Jimmy Newlin, PhD student in the Department of English, will present “Surprised by Son, The Reader in Paradise Lost.” 3 PM. Pugh Hall 301.

2/1/10

The Department’s Composition and Rhetoric Search Committee will provide public forums for candidates to present their research and teaching interests. Laurie Gries will have her research presentation at 4 PM in 219 Dauer.

2/2/10

The Department’s Composition and Rhetoric Search Committee will provide public forums for candidates to present their research and teaching interests. Laurie Gries will have her teaching presentation at 2 PM in 219 Dauer.

2/9/10

RISK Artist Lecture and Film Screening. DDR/DDR, Dir. Amie Siegel. Introduced by Barbara Mennel, Associate Professor, Department of English and Germanic and Slavic Studies. Amie Siegel’s “ciné-constellation” DDR/DDR combines vérité interviews with staged dialogue to excavate East German traumas associated with both the Socialist state and reunification. Siegel’s lens finds filmic lessons, too, in her analysis of Stasi information operations and her inquiries into the suppression of psychoanalysis in the DDR. Siegel teaches in the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University and is a recent recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship. This event is co-sponsored by the Center for European Studies and the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere with support from the Rothman Fund and the Harn Museum. 7 PM, Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art.

2/16/10

Conversations in Children’s Literature. “A Puppet’s Perspective on Children’s Literature,” Rachel Schipper, Associate Dean of Technology and Support Services at the UF Smathers Libraries. Sponsored by the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture and the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. For more information, contact Ramona Caponegro at <ramonac@ufl.edu>. 7 PM. Education Library, Norman Hall.

2/20–2/23/10

FLEX Fest 2010, the Third Invitational Florida Experimental Film/Video Festival. The festival will include screenings by Jacqueline Goss, Helga Fanderl, Michael Gitlin, and Johan Grimonprez at various venues in Gainesville. For more information, see the FLEX WWW site.

2/21/10

RISK Artist Lecture and Film Screening. Short Films, Dir. Helga Fanderl. Introduced by Roger Beebe, Director of FLEX Films and Associate Professor, Department of English. Working exclusively in the small-gauge super 8mm film format and editing entirely in camera, Helga Fanderl has directed more than 400 short films during the last several decades ranging from observational documentary portraits to more abstract, poetic works. Fanderl’s work has received numerous awards and has been presented in major film museums and film festivals since 1990, including Views from the Avant Garde at the New York Film Festival. To view examples of Fanderl’s work, click here. 7:30 PM, Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art. Admission is $4.00 for the general public, $3.00 for students, and free for Harn Museum members.

2/23/10

EGO Web Site Workshop .Ken Booth, Manager of the Application Support Center at UF, will help English graduate students build professional websites. All levels of experience (and questions) welcome. 4–5 PM. Hub 221, Second Floor Computer Lab.

2/23/10

RISK Cinema Artist Lecture and Film Screening. Double Take, Dir. Johan Grimonprez. Grimonprez’s second film essay, Double Take, questions how our view of reality is held hostage by mass media, advertising and Hollywood. Written by award-winning British novelist Tom McCarthy, the film addresses the global rise of fear-as-commodity. Johan Grimonprez lives and works in Belgium and New York. His 1997 video Dial H-I-S-T-O-R-Y earned Grimonprez the Best Director award at the San Francisco Film Festival and Toronto’s Images Festival. In 2006, he was the recipient of the Carnegie Art Award. This event is co-sponsored by FLEX Films and the Center for Humanities and the Public Sphere. To view the trailer for Double Take, click here. 7 PM, Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art. Admission is $4.00 for the general public, $3.00 for students, and free for Harn Museum members.

2/25/10

“Guilt, Debt and the Turn Toward the Future: Walter Benjamin and Hermann Levin Goldschmidt (A Foray into Economic Theology).”A talk by Samuel Weber, Avalon Foundation Professor of Humanities at Northwestern University and Director of the Northwestern Paris Program in Critical Theory. Sponsored by the Center for Jewish Studies, Center for Cultural Judaism and the Posen Seminar in Secular Judaism. For further information contact Dragan Kujundzic <dragan@ufl.edu>. 2–4 PM, Atrium at Ustler Hall.

2/25-2/27/10

“Futures of Digital Studies.” The 5th Digital Assembly conference at University of Florida brings in conversation digital artists and digital theorists. The keynote speakers will be Joseph Tabbi (Professor of English at the University of Illinois at Chicago and President of the Electronic Literature Organization) and John Cayley (Visiting Professor of Literary Arts at Brown University). The event features both a conference and an exhibition of digital works in the UF Reitz gallery. A round table videoconference featuring transnational connections with renowned scholars from US, Canada and Europe (Katherine Hayles, Nick Montfort, Lev Manovich, Jerome McGann, Matthew Kirschnbaum, Arthur Kroker, Rita Raley and others) is scheduled on Saturday, February 27th at the Digital Worlds Institute to discuss the future developments of the field both on the theoretical and institutional levels. See the coference website for full details.

2/26/10

Benjamin’s -abilities. Open public workshop seminar on Walter Benjamin with Professor Samuel Weber, based on his latest book, Benjamin’s -abilities (Harvard University Press, 2008). Participants include John Leavey, Scott Nygren, Terry Harpold, and seminar co-chair Dragan Kujundzic, Center for Jewish Studies. Sponsored by the Center for Jewish Studies, Center for Cultural Judaism and the Posen Seminar in Secular Judaism. For further information contact Dragan Kujundzic <dragan@ufl.edu>. 2–4 PM, 219 Dauer Hall.

3/1/10

Scenes from The Merchant of Venice, a performance to open the conference “Convergences and Conversions: The Merchant of Venice into the 21st Century.” Sponsored by the UF Center for Jewish Studies . 7:30 PM. Ustler Hall Atrium.

3/1-3/2/10

“Convergences and Conversions: The Merchant of Venice into the 21st Century.” The plenary address will be given by Janet Adelman (Professor Emeritus of English, UC Berkeley), the author of Blood Relations: Christian and Jew in The Merchant of Venice (Chicago UP, 2008). Mary Beth Mader (Associate Professor of Philosophy, University of Memphis) will speak on the late Sarah Kofman’s essay “Conversions: The Merchant of Venice under the Sign of Saturn,” followed by a reading of a selection from the essay. The conference is sponsored by Center for Jewish Studies at the University of Florida and made possible with funds from the Grass Chair and a Posen grant. For more information, contact Judith Page or Dragan Kujundzic <dragan@ufl.edu>. All events held in Ulster Hall Atrium.

3/15/10

EGO Job Searching in Academia Workshop. Sid Dobrin will address the job search process from credentialing through job applications, interviews, and offers. This workshop will be as useful to new graduate students as it would be for those graduate students soon to enter the market. All years welcome. 7–10 PM. 210 Pugh Hall.

3/16/10

Conversations in Children’s Literature. “The Art of Curating an Art Exhibit,” Barbara Elleman, Writer, Critic, Editor, and Creator of Book Links magazine. Sponsored by the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture and the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. For more information, contact Ramona Caponegro at <ramonac@ufl.edu>. 7 PM. Education Library, Norman Hall.

3/19/10

EGO Publishing Workshop. Susan Hegeman, Marsha Bryant, and published PhDs will address the publishing process and cover several topics concerning the world of scholarly publishing. Topics will include how to select journals to publish in, how to write a structured abstract, tips on writing the paper, and impact factors. All years (and questions) welcome. 4–5:30 PM. 210 Pugh Hall.

3/19-3/20/10

The Department of English’s Ninth Annual “American Cultures” Symposium, “Incarceration Nation: Interdisciplinary Responses to the US Prison Crisis,”will explore the role of the prison in law, cultural politics, and literature, featuring invited speakers Dylan Rodriguez (UC Riverside), Marie Gottschalk (U Penn), Tanya Erzen (Ohio State), plus work by UF faculty and graduate students. For more information, contact Amy Ongiri or Jodi Schorb. For a full schedule of events, check the symposium website.

Incarceration Nation
3/23/09

RISK Cinema Series. Short Films, Dir. Deimantas Narkevicius. Born in 1964 in Lithuania, Narkevicius lives and works in Vilnius. He works in film and video taking a subjective and contemporary view of history. Narkevicius’s work is a critical look at film, its ability to communicate, and its importance in a primarily visual culture. He connects the past with the present and history with personal experience while pitting documentary truth against potential fiction. He has gained recognition at the highest level within the international art scene and represented his country at the 49th Venice Biennale in 2001. He has a solid record of exhibitions world-wide and held solo exhibitions in France, Belgium, Lithuania and at the Munchner Kunsverein. 7:30 PM, Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art. Admission is $4.00 for the general public, $3.00 for students, and free for Harn Museum members.

3/25/10

Keathley/Naremore Lectures. Christian Keathley (Associate Professor, Film and Media Culture, MiddleburyCollege) and James Naremore (Professor Emeritus, Department of Communication and Culture, Indiana University) will lecture as invited speakers of the Film & Media Studies program. Keathley will lecture on Otto Perminger's Bonjour Tristesse and Naremore will lecture on Sweet Smell of Success. 7:30 PM. Turlington 2319.

3/25–3/27/10

"The Global South,” the Twelth Annual Marxist Reading Group Conference. The keynote speaker will be Hazel Carby (Charles C. & Dorathea S. Dilley Professor of African American Studies & American Studies, as well as Professor of American Studies). The conference will include a roundtable with special guest James Peacock. For a full schedule, check the conference program.

The Global South
3/26/10

Keathley/Naremore Colloquim. Christian Keathley (Associate Professor, Film and Media Culture, MiddleburyCollege) and James Naremore (Professor Emeritus, Department of Communication and Culture, Indiana University) will hold a colloquim as invited speakers of the Film & Media Studies program. Noon. Pugh 210.

3/26-3/27/10

ImageNext: Visions Past and Future. 2010 UF Conference on Comics and Graphic Novels will include speakers David Kunzle (Professor of Art History, UCLA/author: The History of the Comic Strip, Father of the Comic Strip: Rodolphe Töpffer), John Porcellino (Cartoonist/author:King Cat), Molly Kiely (Cartoonist/author: Diary of a Dominatrix, That Kind of Girl), and Corey Creekmur (Director of the Institute for Cinema and Culture, University of Iowa). See the conference website for a full schedule.

ImageNext: Visions Past and Future
3/31/10

An Evening with Frances Mayes. Deparment alumna Mayes will read from her newest memoir, Every Day in Tuscany. Sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. See the event site for a complete description. 7:30 PM. Pugh Hall.

4/5/10

EGO State-of-the-Field Lunch Series. Discuss with Film & Media Studies, and Comics & Visual Rhetoric professors current trends, particular journals to read and submit to, conferences to attend, and other important professional issues. 12–1 PM. Dauer 215.

4/5/10

Stammtisch Graduate Talk Series. PhD candidate Katharine Westaway will present “’O Cleft Effect! Cold Modesty, Hot Wrath’: Shakespeare’s Vacillating Consideration of A Lover’s Complaint.” 3 PM. Pugh Hall 302.

4/6/10

EGO State-of-the-Field Lunch Series. Discuss with African-American/Africana Literature, American Literature, and American Studies professors current trends, particular journals to read and submit to, conferences to attend, and other important professional issues. 12–1 PM. Dauer 215.

4/7/10

EGO State-of-the-Field Lunch Series. Discuss with Theory Studies, Feminisms, Genders & Sexualities, Cultural Studies, and Twentieth Century Studies professors current trends, particular journals to read and submit to, conferences to attend, and other important professional issues. 12–1 PM. Dauer 215.

4/8/10

EGO State-of-the-Field Lunch Series. Discuss with Post-Colonial Studies professors current trends, particular journals to read and submit to, conferences to attend, and other important professional issues. 12–1 PM. Dauer 215.

4/8/10

Process-Oriented Fictions: Narrative in the Age of Media Machines.” Noah Wardrip-Fruin (Assistant Professor, Expressive Intelligence Studio, Department of Computer Science, UC Santa Cruz). will hold a critique/discussion of his new book Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies, a sample of which can be downloaded from MIT press, and will present “Playing What We Mean: Games, Fiction, and Expressive Processing.”. Wardrip-Fruin is a creator of literary art in digital media whose work connects writing with the arts, humanities, and computer science with a particular interest in fiction and playability. His projects of different sorts include The Impermanence Agent, Screen, The New Media Reader (co-edited with Nick Montfort), three edited collections with Pat Harrigan (First Person, Second Person, and Third Person), and the group blog Grand Text Auto. Sponsored by Digital Media Art and Digital Assembl.y. Critique/Discussion: 10 AM–12 PM. FAC302. Talk: 5–7 PM. Reitz Union, Room 282.

Process-Oriented Fictions: Noah Wardrip-Fruin
4/9-4/10/10

Art and Democracy Symposium. International scholars will convene at the Harn Museum of Art to discuss the dynamic interchange between art and politics in conjunction with Project Europa: Imagining the (Im)Possible. The keynote address will be given by François Cusset (Professor of American studies at the University of Paris), an intellectual historian whose body of work includes the critically acclaimed French Theory: How Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze, & Co. Transformed the Intellectual Life of the United States (University of Minnesota Press, 2008). Featured speakers will include Alex Alberro (Virginia Bloedel Wright Associate Professor of Art History, Barnard College, Columbia University), Nora Alter (Professor of Film and Media Studies, University of Florida), Claire Bishop (Associate Professor of Art History, Graduate Center, City University of New York) T.J. Demos (Lecturer, Department of History of Art, University College London) Tim Griffin (Editor–in-Chief, Artforum), Maria Hlavajova (Curator and Artistic Director, Basis voor Actuele Kunst, the Netherlands), and Shepherd Steiner (Visiting Assistant Professor, Modern and Contemporary Art, University of Florida). The symposium is co-sponsored by Harn Eminent Scholar Chair in Art History, School of Art + Art History, Center for European Studies, Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, France-Florida Research Institute and the International Center. For more information, visit <www.harn.ufl.edu/projecteuropaexhibition.html>.

4/12/10

EGO State-of-the-Field Lunch Series. Discuss with Children's Literature professors current trends, particular journals to read and submit to, conferences to attend, and other important professional issues. 12–1 PM. Dauer 215.

4/13/10

EGO State-of-the-Field Lunch Series. Discuss with Medieval/Early Modern, Renaissance, Romanticism, Victorian Studies, and Twentieth Century Studies professors current trends, particular journals to read and submit to, conferences to attend, and other important professional issues. 12–1 PM. Dauer 215.

4/14/10

EGO State-of-the-Field Lunch Series. Discuss with Composition & Rhetoric professors current trends, particular journals to read and submit to, conferences to attend, and other important professional issues. 12–1 PM. Dauer 215.

4/16/10

“Rafah is Port-au-Prince: Comparing the Borders of Colonial Modernity.” Alex Lubin (Associate Professor and Chair of American Studies, University of New Mexico) will explore the comparative settler colonial projects that unite colonial borders like Rafah and Port au Prince, or Ramallah and New Orleans. 4 PM. 219 Dauer Hall.

4/16/10

EGO Teaching Workshop. Raúl Sánchezand a panel of graduate student instructors present teaching strategies for teaching and building assignments. General topics – applying to AML, Brit and Film classes – may include: building syllabi, choosing a reading list, creating assignments, and pedagogical practices, among others. Topics may change depending on the needs of the workshop participants. All years and levels of experience welcome. 4:30–5:30 PM. 210 Pugh Hall.

4/20/10

Conversations in Children’s Literature. “A Fish in the Moonlight: Acting Out Childhood for Young Audiences,” Sidney Homan, UF Professor of English, Actor, and Director. Sponsored by the Center for Children’s Literature and Culture and the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. For more information, contact Ramona Caponegro at <ramonac@ufl.edu>. 7 PM. Education Library, Norman Hall.

5/15/10

Jane Austen Society of North America. Dr. Pat Craddock (Professor Emerita of English, UF) will present “Speak, that I May See Thee,” discussing the work of Jane Austen and Samuel Johnson. 12-2 PM. Alachua County Library, Tower Road Branch . For more information, contact Kristen Smith <kdgs54@gmail.com>.